Thursday, 9 March 2017






Mother and baby homes commission Uncovering a dark legacy

THE POOR CHILDREN OF THE TUAM BABY HOMES




Confirmation that the remains of a significant number of babies and infants up to three years of age, probably in their hundreds, have been found on the site of the former mother and baby home in Tuam, Co Galway, has prompted profound upset. It follows an investigation by the Commission on Mother and Baby Homes which carried out planned excavations there in 2015. The commission’s admission that it was “shocked” by the scale of the discovery reflects the disturbing circumstances of what has the hallmarks of inhuman burial.

Test trenches were dug revealing two large structures. The fact that one structure appears to be a sewage containment system or septic tank that had been decommissioned and filled with rubble adds to the distress of those trying to come to terms with this dark episode. The second connected structure is divided into 20 chambers; 17 of which contained remains. These related to individuals with age-at-death ranges from approximately 35 foetal weeks to two to three years. Radiocarbon testing suggests they date from the time frame relevant to the operation of the home, from 1925 to 1961. This was not (as suggested by some) a Famine grave from the mid 19th century when mass burial became the norm in desperate times.



Minister for Children Katherine Zappone has acknowledged the “very sad and disturbing” but not unexpected news. Her department has brought together key departments and agencies to seek greater accountability. The commission is also correctly focusing on postmortem practices and procedures, and reporting and burial arrangements for residents of mother and baby homes. Unacceptably high mortality rates in these homes tell their own story of poor care.

There is a collective responsibility for an inhuman regime conducted for decades in secrecy behind high walls and not talked about by a submissive society. Culpability lies with the State; the Catholic Church, notably the Sisters of the Bon Secours order which ran the institution and at one point denied the existence of a mass grave, and those in the wider community who facilitated burials in such an undignified manner.



There is every likelihood of many more locations where the marginalised were buried in similar circumstances; not just from mother and baby homes and county homes but also Magdalene laundries, orphanages, industrial schools and workhouses. The commission is tasked with investigating allegations of abuse at 14 mother and baby homes and four county homes between 1922 and 1998. Given what its work has exposed in Tuam, with the considerable help of local historian Catherine Corless and backed by the testimony of relatives of those who lived in the home and some who lived nearby, the limitation of its remit suggests it will only provide a summary of our dark history.



PAT SAYS:

We all realuse now that there will have to be a FULL  NATIONAL INVESTIGATION into child and vulnerabke care in Ireland from 1922 to the present day.

The early Irish state handed the care of children and vulnerable adults over to the churches.

The RC church being the church of the majority was the major supplier.

It is quite obvious that tge church in  so many cases failed those in their care and sometimes neglected, abused and even murdered them.

This is nothing short of CRIMES AGAINST HUMANITY.

Those responsible and still living should be prosecuted.

The church made a fortune from its care work.

That money in some cases was PROCEEDS OF CRIME.

Those who are living on it and its invedtment interest should have it taken from them by the CRIMINAL ASSETS BUREAU.

Justice needs to be done.

Justice should be seen to done.

BAD TIMING !!!

MINISTER LAUNCHES BON SECOURS HOSPITAL LIMERICK AT BARRINGTONS

The Minister for Finance, Michael Noonan formally launched Bon Secours Hospital Limerick at Barringtons today following its purchase by Bon Secours Health System.
The addition of Barringtons Hospital to the largest private hospital group in Ireland increases staff numbers to 3,000, making the Bon Secours Health System a significant employer in the country and in the region.

Bon Secours Health System is Ireland’s largest independent Hospital Group and incorporates five modern acute hospitals in Cork, Dublin, Galway and Tralee and now Limerick and also a Care Village in Cork. With over 3,000 staff, 876 beds, 400 consultants, Bon Secours treats approximately 250,000 patients a year.

As part of the Bon Secours Health System’s “2020 Plan” the Hospital Group is currently investing €150m in capital investment in an effort to enhance Advanced Medicine Exceptional Care across all its hospital sites in the regions.

Welcoming the news today, Minister Noonan said, "Barringtons hospital boasts modern facilities with highly trained staff and strong links with LIT and UL providing a training outlet for students, employment opportunities for graduates and ensures that cutting edge medicine is engrained in the services of the hospital."
He added, "Barringtons has served the people of Limerick well for many years, it's now time for it to enter a new phase in its history but also, continue the tradition of healing and helping that Limerick has come to depend on."

28 comments:

  1. In Tuam, Ireland, it was discovered that the remains of around 800 babies were disposed of in a septic tank at a Catholic workhouse for unmarried mothers.


    Human nature is prone to double-think and cognitive dissonance. That is why Christians may decide during Church that they believe in the religion but as soon as they are out the door their atheist or humanist side dominates. Religion is such effective training in cognitive dissonance that it is possible for it to justify murder like it may have done in this case. The way the babies were dumped might indicate that they were not baptised. Catholicism teaches that unbaptised babies are estranged from God. In reality it is God that would have to be estranged from the babies! What a vindictive petty God! Those who take their babies for baptism when they have no say in it, are disrespecting their babies and enabling an evil system of doctrine. They are allowing and even encouraging a religion to insult their babies. Whatever happened to assuming babies don't need forgiveness from God in baptism until it is proven that they do? What about innocent until proven guilty? If a baptised baby ends up being a really good person, that is in spite of baptism and the nasty message it conveys.

    Re The Telegraph's Tim Stanley trying to make out that the mass graves of babies in Tuam is a human tragedy not a Catholic one though it is plain that the Church is to blame for those deaths.

    You know this thing with the babies being dumped by nuns in septic tanks. Everybody is so outraged. My problem with that is actions speak loudest and nobody "cares" until the media shows what is going on. Then the hollow apologies come. The Catholic Church is always sorry when it is caught out. Wish some bishops and priests and nuns would stop manipulating and just tell the truth: "We don't care". They hope to go to Heaven where they admit they won't care about the suffering of children and family in Hell.

    Somebodys insinuation here that the nuns and priests involved did not believe in God is ludicrous for only a small percentage of the population supports atheism and people who dedicate their lives to indoctrinating children and praying and celibacy and make prisoners of themselves definitely do believe. The problem is that Catholicism is man-made and thus has no more power than anything else to arrest the human inclination to be evil. It does not really care for it gives quack treatments for sin and remember that the list of sins for Catholics is far bigger than the list most of us live by. For example, deliberate doubt of church teaching is a sin whereas for most ordinary people it is a virtue. If Jesus founded Catholicism on fake hope he must take some of the responsibility if not all of it. Your insinuation that you have to disbelieve in God to be bad is grossly bigoted and what about good little children of seven and eight who think they do not believe?

    Be careful not to say that nuns who dump unbaptised children in septic tanks are so called-Christians. If Christianity is man-made the label is man-made and they claim it so they can have it. They can be called Christian. There is no way to judge a religion good except by the behaviour of its members. Religion asks you to believe and obey – it treats belief as an action too. So religion whatever it is is certainly soething you do! This shit where we are told that a bad Hindu is not a Hindu or an ISIS terrorist is not a Muslim and a cruel Christian is not a Christian is nonsense and an insult both to the bad people and their victims and to those who want to accurately diagnose the problem. And Catholicism tries to make Christians not out of good works but out of magical rites such as baptism. An absolute disgrace.

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    1. A most thought provoking contribution from someone with a very interesting mind.

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    2. A lot of retrograde woolly thinking too though - - very disappointing in view of the excellent and more balanced posts that Pat has received over the last few days...

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    3. MournemanMichael9 March 2017 at 13:08

      Disagree with Anon @11:57. It is a sensible analysis of some of the really cock eyed taught beliefs of the RC self serving institution albeit with some righteous indignation. I welcome such insight.
      MMM

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  2. I believe the British Legion has a phrase "Least we forget" I believe this phrase should be adapted least Ireland forgets the abuses of people young and old in the past. As I may have said before a suitable monument/exhibition would be the tip of the iceberg. Going forward Ireland needs to don sackcloth and ashes with regard the past but prove repentance through the quality of care offered to people of the present and future.

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    1. MournemanMichael9 March 2017 at 13:11

      Excellent post Sean.
      Absolutely endorse your last sentence. Proof of pudding time beckons.
      MMM

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    2. Whilst your at why don't you stick a few flags up around the monument too. Something made out of stone or concrete isn't going to change anything or bring anyone back.

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    3. 13.40 It's not about bringing back. It's about acknowledging the past and safeguarding the present and future. The white in the Irish flag isn't just about peace with the Orange

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  3. Just heard that Archb Charlie Brown is on his way to Albania!! Interesting

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  4. Goodbye to Charlie Brown!

    He's off to... ALBANIA!

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  5. PS: PS: Maybe someone in Rome has been watching the GAYNOOTH and TUAM BABIES developments - and realise that Ireland is fast becoming Post Catholic?

    They do not have ANYONE to send that will stop that continuing.

    Jesus is busy elsewhere!

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  6. There is too much hype and hysteria over this story. It's sad, yes but there is too many anti-Church people jumping on the bandwagon. Let the inquiry take its course without preempting it. The Church is only one among other institutions and the State who were involved. Let us get it in perspective before getting hyper.

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    1. @12.33 Absolutely! - - a mature approach is needed-..and that, above all, includes NOT erroneously branding you as someone who somehow approves of the discredited welfare regime or wants to engage in a cover up. That would be unfair in the extreme as it is not at all the same thing!

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    2. MournemanMichael9 March 2017 at 13:18

      Can you assist Anon @12:33 by listing the other institutions you refer to and explain their involvement, for example, specifically in the Tuam matter.
      MMM

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    3. (I am not the poster Anon 12.33 in case of confusion! -) It is good that MMM has referred to the necessity for " listing other institutions" - - Surely that is the whole point of the coming inquiry! To find out more about who was involved and where culpability lies. If we list them(without prejudice) at this moment and name fairly their involvement, then we wouldn't need an enquiry! But we do.

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  7. Yes certainly. County Coroner, Gardai, Doctors who signed death certificates. People who worked in the institution. The men who dug the graves. The people who actually placed the bodies there. The Department of Health.

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  8. Totally agree 13.47, what MMM and others fail to recognise is they are not part of the inquiry and should not be passing judgement until it's findings are published.

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  9. Dail debate on Tuam suspended today after less than 20 TD's turned up for it. Tells you a lot, doesn't it.

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  10. MournemanMichael9 March 2017 at 15:47

    Thank you Anon @14:00. Am not "passing" judgement 14:17. Just don't understand the ROI welfare/legal framework so seeking information.
    Thanks
    MMM

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  11. I am getting tired of listening to the "blame game" about Tuam etc

    While I accept that all those mentioned had a part to play in this terrible heartbreaking affair I am so angry that the original culprits have got away Scot free and are rarely mentioned .Where were all the fathers of these babies who left these girls to fend for themselves and condemned them to a life of misery?

    One of the nuns said to one of the mother's "You've had your pleasure .Now you must pay for it" While the fathers went off to enjoy the rest of their lives.

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  12. I've been watching documentaries online today about Mother and baby homes, Magdalene homes, orphanages, etc and I'm absolutely emotionally and physically drained. I've cried so much hearing all those stories. emotional abuse, babies being sold to america, women disowned by family and society, the very people who should show mercy denying it.

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  13. The Prayer of St. Ephram (a Roman Catholic)

    O Lord and Master of my life,
    take from me the spirit of sloth, despondency, lust for power and idle talk.
    (Prostration)

    But grant unto me, Thy servant,
    a spirit of chastity, humility, patience and love.
    (Prostration)

    Yea, O Lord and King,
    grant me to see mine own faults
    and not to judge my brothers and sisters.
    For blessed art Thou unto ages of ages.
    Amen.
    (Prostration)

    O God, cleanse Thou me a sinner. (Repeat 12 times, with as many bows, and then again the whole prayer from the beginning throughout, and after that one great prostration.)

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  14. St.Ephrem's beautiful Lenten prayer---how appropriate and timely a meditation! A gift.

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  15. Amy Martin has made a rare appearance on BBC1 N Ireland Newsline at 6.30pm available on iplayer. She said she was ashamed of the Tuam Story. Came across totally unconvincing and has aged.

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  16. Thank you 22.28, just watched Amy's patethic interview. It is now repeated on BBC Newsline N Ireland on BBC i player at 10.30pm also. She said, "We should establish the whole truth at what happened at that time so that we as a community can move from the dark chapters of our past". When saying this she shrugged her shoulders, totally insincere and false man. As someone said earlier she has aged quickly and looks like a hag.

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