Sunday, 23 July 2017

PICS THE NAVAN PRIESTS DO NOT WANT YOU TO SEE

The other day I showed you all the outside of THE PRIEST'S PALACE of Navan in Meath diocese:



The Navan clergy were non too happy that I showed you their palace of a presbytery.

Did any of you try and imagine what the INSIDE is like?

Today I bring you pics of the inside - which has recently been refurbished at a SECRET COST.

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A PRIEST'S ROOM


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NEW WALL TO WALL SHELVING WITH HIDDEN LIGHTING

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NEWLY PANELLED AND PAINTED ARCHES

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HIDDEN RADIATORS AND NEW BRASS ELECTRIC FITTINGS
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WALL TO WALL WOOD / GLASS SHELVING WITH HIDDEN LIGHTING AND CHANDELIERS

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MARBLE FIRE PLACES

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WALL CHANDELIERS

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HIDDEN RADIATORS

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GRILL RADIATOR COVERS
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BRASS ELECTRIC WITH DIMMER SWITCHES

Is this the first time you have seen inside an Irish priest's house - or even Navan Priest's Palace?

Not bad eh?

But then the Navan people give generously to their clergy.

This is this Sunday's announcement of last Sunday's collection


Image result for priests and money


OFFERTORY COLLECTION:  EURO 3,850

DEVELOPMENT FUND: 2,310

TOTAL: E 6,160 PER WEEK


PER YEAR 6,160 X 52 = E 320,320.00

PLUS

CLERGY COLLECTIONS
WEDDING OFFERINGS
FUNERAL OFFERINGS
BAPTISM OFFERINGS
MASS OFFERINGS












89 comments:

  1. A Navan Parishioner24 July 2017 at 00:14

    Delighted to see that the priests are being accomodated so well. They deserve it - they work hard for us all in Navan.
    And they are up front about all the collections.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 'Up front about all the collections'? But not, it seems, up-front about how much of it is spent on making themselves very comfortable indeed.

      Delete
  2. Fr. Louis, Kevin, Declan and Robert are a fine group of men, much loved by the people they have devoted their lives to serve here in Navan, that accounts for the high level of financial support they receive. What point are you trying to make Bishop Buckley in this posting? Could this be the green eyed monster in you?

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    Replies
    1. Sorry can somebody explain the comment that was made the last time a photograph of the four priests was put up? I didn't understand what was meant about the Air Corps

      Delete
    2. 00.20 That comment could come back to haunt you. I'm very wary when someone describes a group of Priests as "fine men" going on past situations. Some Priests in the past who no longer serve as Priests were often described as "fine men". I shall look forward with interest to Pat's sex scandal regarding Meath and I will keep a very open mind until then.

      Delete
  3. Pat, the wainscoting (the wooden paneling on the lower part of the walls) looks to be MDF. I hope that was reflected in the price and they weren't billed for wood.

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  4. I was one of the builders who refurbished the fathers house. We did it at cut price, and beyond their required spec because we want the best for the fathers and we want it to last.

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  5. Is this the Meath scandal? The presbytery being done up? Ok so they went a bit camp on the interior and seem to have had the gold on mirror restored. Didn't someone say Fr Hurley that the priest was in France and probably thinks this is the nearest he'll get to Versailles. Fr Gavin left Navan and went to Paris but now he has to come back cus Mgr Connolly from Maynooth is going to Paris. What is it about Paris?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No. It's one of the Meath scandals. This is the money one. The sex one will follow.

      Delete
    2. Look forward to it.

      Delete
  6. I am a labourer living in Navan and earn 350 a week before tax. I cannot afford wooden paneling, chandeliers, brass fittings etc in my home. Plastic for me. I am shocked by the lifestyle of the priests. No more Mass and collections for me and my wife. What happened Jesus born in a stable and living simply in Nazareth?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Pull the other one

      Delete
    2. So Jesus didn't live much more simply than these priests?

      Why do men who claim they want to follow Christ as priests insist on living more like Judas Iscariot? He, too, was fond of money, and of spending it on himself? (Used to pilfer from donations to the poor.)

      Delete
  7. What family in Navan is living like the priests? I live on 180 a week and have the heat on occasionally. Would I be welcome for a meal in the Priests Palace? I doubt it.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Is this the Meath Scandal?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A precursor. The main course is still to come.

      Delete
  9. Do we get to see he bedrooms?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I imagine the priests would be delighted to show you them... in person.

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    2. I doubt that very much 13.12. Most presbyteries tend not to be very inviting. If the Priests want to invite people in they should make the offer and not wait for people to ask.

      Delete
  10. Why do 4 "bachelors" live in what looks like a hotel. Why not a 4 bedroom house in a Navan estate? Have the priests replaced the British landed aristocracy?

    ReplyDelete
  11. So what was the budget? Appears to be doing up rooms as opposed to necessarily structural work. Was it really necessary?

    ReplyDelete
  12. This weeks bulletin in Navan: "SUPPORTING MEALS ON WHEELS: Thanks to Anonymous for €100 & Anonymous €50".
    There would have been an awful fed in lieu of paneling on the walls of the Presbytery. What was it The Bull McCabe said in The Field? "No priest ever died during the Famine"

    ReplyDelete
  13. French prosecutor finds no case against Cardinal Barbarin

    https://www.catholicculture.org/news/headlines/index.cfm?storyid=32087

    On your blog of April 5, 2016, you had the folliwing to say:

    Pat says:
    Very little to say - except that the Church and its senior officials are still covering up abuse.
    Bishops who do so should go to prison - starting with Cardinal Barbarin of Lyon.

    In the interest of justice you might consider commenting again.

    ReplyDelete
  14. We don't expect our priests to live in squalid sub-standard accommodation. They have given up enough, the least they can have is a decent place to live. So spare us the mock indignation Pat and go rain on someone else's parade.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 08:29, 'the least they can have is a decent place to live'? There's 'decent' and there's 'decent'.

      Stop defending the indefensible. These men come across as being more interested in mammon than God.

      Delete
    2. Mags, you're becoming rude again. Don't let it happen, please! There is 'decent' and "decent" as you say but you should do the "decent" thing and name Pat's despicable behaviour for what it is. His traipsing round the country posing as some kind of modern day prophet is laughable. He sinks lower into his own mire every day. Don't follow him.....

      Delete
    3. Oh dear 15.27, it seems Pat has upset you in some way. Has he named you on the blog perhaps or maybe you feel threatened in some way. My only advice to Pat is to keep up the good work.

      Delete
  15. The parishioners of Navan dearly love their four priests, there's not many people in that town would begrudge those priests anything. As far as I'm aware that house was built for a bishop in the 19th century, there's nothing shocking about a few shelves. "Navan priests in parochial house paint shock!" God bless those priests, the people of Navan love them for a reason Pat.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Taking a step back and looking at this rationally and not emotionally, it's not as if the priests in Navan chose to build that particular house. It is the house that comes with the assignment. Secondly, it would be more financially wasteful to buy or rent accommodation that could be perceived as modest when there's already a building available to accommodate them. Thirdly, as far as I'm aware, the house in question also house extensive administrative offices and meeting rooms, and is not simply a place of residence. Fourthly, as the house is owned by the parish they have a duty to maintain it. Letting fall apart would also be financially irresponsible. Fifthly, I'd imagine that a house situated directly beside a busy church might be difficult to sell. Finally, just because a person lives in a fancy house doesn't mean that they can't live a simple life.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you poster 11.32
      At last, we get the voice of reason...

      Delete
    2. In England, lots of former vicarages adjacent to churches have sold well. Closer to home, this former parochial house and presbytery was on the market for 3 million euro. https://www.irishtimes.com/life-and-style/homes-and-property/new-to-market/take-me-to-church-in-glasthule-two-religious-buildings-ripe-for-conversion-1.2999641?mode=amp

      Delete
  17. I do not know how many rooms there are in the Navan priest's house but there are over 60 windows on three floors.

    As a sign of commitment to Christ and his poor could the priests not live on the two top floors and have the homeless or immigrants live on the bottom floor? Navan parishioner.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. As a long time parishioner of Navan I am shocked by these photos. I think the priests should live in houses or flats in estates among the people. That palace should be sold as a small hotel.

      Delete
    2. I agree. A two or three bedroom semi is enough for anyone, especially a bachelor.

      Delete
    3. There would be big implications for insurance, rates and legal safety issues regarding fire escapes and other issues if immigrants or other tenants were given accommodation and the house would be rated as a HSO property (House of Multiple Occupancy) It is not as simple as it seems..

      Delete
    4. So? On 6,000 a week they are not unsurmountable issues?

      Delete
    5. I have no idea whether the issues are insurmountable or not. I have never examined the internal layout of that particular building. I merely drew attention to the fact that it was not such a simple matter as had been implied.

      Delete
    6. It's called following Jesus! Simple!

      Delete
  18. Would Jesus share his house with the "poor"?

    ReplyDelete
  19. I am a religious priest and have spent my life preaching parish missions and supply work. I have always remarked to my brethren that the priests of Meath diocese live very high lifestyles and no money is spared on their houses, cars, holidays, food and drinks cabinets. If I were a priest of that diocese I think I might be well over weight. The old saying: "He went out to do good and he did well" applies. Honest Religious.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You Big hypocrite - Honest Religious. Honest??? if you belong to a religious order you have everything supllied for you, morning, noon and night. I know as I've worked with and in Religious Orders Houses. They are not SMALL and usually are very spacious and comfortable. You are living off the benefits and goodness of people just like Diicesan Priests. If you have done missions a over the country I'm sure you were well looked after and handsomely paid. You certainly didn't do your misdion for free. I find your hypocrisy nauseating. People in glasshouses shouldn't throw stones......

      Delete
    2. Not all religious houses are like palaces Reverend. I've obviously touched a nerve Father in speaking as I find. I don't do the Mission appeals anymore, thank God. Meath was the worst putting on a total banquet - no expense spared plus Armagh and then Dublin and Killala. The extravagance was an affront to Priesthood and Christianity. I'm sorry my words seem harsh and brutally honest. All I will say is shame on you priests and even more shame on your Bishops. I know it hurts but honesty is the best way. I spoke to my young successor and he tells me little has changed.

      Delete
    3. Tell us Honest Religious about your house, your Order's finances, your daily food and drinks cabinets, your cars for each member, your manicured lawns, your electronic gates, your cooks and housekeepers... I'm certain you never have to borrow for a car, holidays, house renovations, like Diocesan Priests do.I've witnessed all of this. You have shown yourself a true hypicrite. My world is not the smug, carefree, comfortable one you think it may be. Far from it. Again, look a little closer to home and you'll find you're not on the breadline with the assets which I'm sure your Order shares with you to give you all that you require without once having to pay across the food tills at supermarkets, whuch is where I meet many of my parishioners. So, Rev. Honest - get real.

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    4. I'm also certain Rev. Honest that you hung around the Churches until you got your last few envelopes from local, kind Parishioners and that the local clergy ensured you were well rewarded by their support of your visit. I think your attitude shows an ingratitude. Again, all Orders are mostly very wealthy.

      Delete
    5. I am an interior designer and get called to look at many parish houses. Many of these houses are old period houses and quiet honestly the interior deserves to look nice and in keeping with the house .Many irish people like to have a nice home and I don't see why our priests should be subjected to living in damp, smelly,out of date holes. So I believe you need to get off what ever band wagon you are on , and build a Bridge...
      Get over it and yourself .

      Delete
  20. Luke 16:19-31 NRSV 

    19 ‘There was a rich man who was dressed in purple and fine linen and who feasted sumptuously every day. 20 And at his gate lay a poor man named Lazarus, covered with sores, 21 who longed to satisfy his hunger with what fell from the rich man’s table; even the dogs would come and lick his sores.

    22 The poor man died and was carried away by the angels to be with Abraham. The rich man also died and was buried. 23 In Hades, where he was being tormented, he looked up and saw Abraham far away with Lazarus by his side.24 He called out, “Father Abraham, have mercy on me, and send Lazarus to dip the tip of his finger in water and cool my tongue; for I am in agony in these flames.”

    25 But Abraham said, “Child, remember that during your lifetime you received your good things, and Lazarus in like manner evil things; but now he is comforted here, and you are in agony. 26 Besides all this, between you and us a great chasm has been fixed, so that those who might want to pass from here to you cannot do so, and no one can cross from there to us.”

    27 He said, “Then, father, I beg you to send him to my father’s house— 28 for I have five brothers—that he may warn them, so that they will not also come into this place of torment.”

    29 Abraham replied, “They have Moses and the prophets; they should listen to them.”

    30 He said, “No, father Abraham; but if someone goes to them from the dead, they will repent.”

    31 He said to him, “If they do not listen to Moses and the prophets, neither will they be convinced even if someone rises from the dead.”’

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh it'true - now we have the proof: Even Satan can quote scripture for his purposes!

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    2. And now, through you, we have proof that he takes no heed of it either.

      Delete
  21. It strikes me upon reading some of the comments today that they are clearly being submitted by Meath Clergy and their close associates. It's very telling the language used and the amount of similar language and comments being submitted at the same time. You cannot possibly justify any priest living in such luxury. Pope Francis sacked the Bishop of bling in Germany for living in such luxury. That is why I will be submitting these pictures of Navan luxury to him.

    ReplyDelete
  22. I was in St Peters Cathedral Belfast from 1978 to 1983.

    Our rooms were simple enough and I shared a bathroom.

    But the food and the drink was 5 star - cooked breakfast everyday, ,4 lunch every day with sherry, wine and brandy. High tea every day.

    When I started working with the people on housing and crime I was banished from the priests dining room and are with the housekeepers in the kitchen.

    Only priests were allowed in the dining room.

    When my parents visited I had to take them to a cafe.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You had to take your dear parents to a café when they visited? Good God!

      I'm sure they were hurt to hear how their son was being mistreated...by so-called 'priests'.

      Delete
    2. The only "lay people" I saw in the dining room in my 5 years were: members of the House of Lords, MPs, British Army generals and senior RUC officers.

      Delete
  23. I told someone in Navan about this blog today. People are more shocked about your blasphemous posts about Jesus and aren't really bothered by the pictures of the priests house.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Those pictures of the inside of the priests house were already on the internet.

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    2. If they are not shocked by the Priests palace then that worries me. You wouldn't get that many flowers in all window sills of Buckingham Palace let alone anywhere else. I'm afraid your false claim that it doesn't shock people doesn't hold water and is totally without any credibility. Are you connected in anyway to the palace by any chance? Sounds like it to me flower.

      Delete
    3. No connection, but if you're shocked by a few window boxes mate then you have issues. A friend from Navan said this blog was a load of bull and quit reading it. After today I think he was right.

      Delete
    4. If you don't like what you read on here, why read it? I think we are talking about a lot more than a "few" window boxes here. For the record I'm not your "mate". Nobody's asking you to read the blog, so run along.

      Delete
  24. In all your photos you have that abandoned little boy look, that's quite endearing. It gives a glimpse into who you really are when the props are taken away. A sad little boy who never quite fitted in with others......

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mr or Mrs psychologist has made a surprise appearance. What would you know about looking at anyone's picture, you sound priceless and quite frankly you sound an idiot. Wouldn't mind knowing about the skeletons in your wardrobe of which i would say are many.

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    2. So 16.06 is also the supreme master at jumping to conclusions about a person whom he has never met! Re"skeletons... are many.." remark.

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    3. 17.46 I was trying to prove a point which you have just confirmed for me - you can't judge someone you haven't met like 15.46 who judged Pat because of his photo.

      Delete
  25. Does this parish publish annual accounts? I bet there Would be a large figure under the miscellaneous section not to mention food & drink and flowers/gardening. If they want to be transparent they should make their accounts public and invite people to view their property.

    ReplyDelete
  26. Of the Navan accounts are published annually and are easily available if you are at Mass. Anybody who is regularly at church, wouldn't need to ask that question!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The accounts should be available for all to see, not just regular mass goers.

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    2. The accounts are available to everyone who is there to receive a copy. (I suppose that has to include people whose contributions appear to be missing..!)

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    3. Let me have a copy of the accounts or send me one please. Can I call at the palace and receive a copy please? Who do I ask for? Can you show me around at the same time? Do furnish me with your contact details so I can make arrangements. You did say earlier that the four priests would be happy to show anyone around personally. Thank you.

      Delete
    4. All of the above points were already dealt with in the Parish Bulletin.. You really need to keep up...

      Delete
  27. Actually the only thing that has surprised me on this blog is the claim that retired priests live in poverty. I have never yet come across a priest or male religious (except for the mire austere orders) who didn't have a higher stamdard of living than I do myself. The standard aimed for always seems to be at least one step above what you can afford on an average wage with the outgoings of rent and so on. I have made the point here before that much of priests' standard of living comes as gifts - meals, money, what have you - and this is another example.
    Plus it does look anonymous like a hotel room - those rooms need darker colours. Imagine living with that crime against interior design!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Looks "anonymous"?

      Delete
  28. Our faith says live and let live, or rather live and let God. What difference does it make to my life these matters?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It should make a difference, if you believe 'these matters' are setting a poor moral example.

      What was it Irish statesman Edmund Burke said? About evil, and indifferent good people?

      Delete
  29. Bless me Father for I have peeped. My what a great big house you've got.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Magna, good point made and I concur. However I chose to dust my feet and walk away in peace from these matters. And in doing so following a very different path to wholeness...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You have a point, too.

      Surrender every difficulty (every thing) to God that he may deal with it; and he WILL deal with it, provided the surrender is sincere and constant.

      But then, he may prompt us to act in some way on his behalf. Be prepared to act; be alert to his prompts. And then continue in peace.

      Delete
  31. There's probably more staff than priests to maintain such a big house.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 4 priests, 9 staff.

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    2. 2.25 staff per priest. Extraordinary.

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  32. What do you make of poor Charlie Guard's situation, Bishop Pat?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Charlie Guards situation has been decided by a High Court, to prolong his suffering would be inhumane. His Parents have accepted that, very difficult though this is. What would Bishop Pat, you or I to change that. His parents now realise they can't change it. Stupid question may I add and to use this situation to score cheap points, you should be totally and utterly ashamed of yourself.

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    2. Correct! Well said, 00.50.

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  33. What do you believe about the Eucharistic and Transubstantiation out of interest Pat?

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  34. how come your pictures don't seem like the rooms are "lived in"?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well, they aren't 'lived in'...yet. The rooms have been refurbished/renovated. Presumably their customary occupants were temporarily housed elsewhere for the duration.

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  35. They weren't being lived in because they were being renovated - hello!!!

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  36. Under Legislation with the New Charities Act all income and expenditure and all sources of income have to be declared in an open and teansparent way. Most Dioceses now have professional accountants and financiers working in this vital area and parish finances are now looked after by Finance Committees. Often Parishes are visited by tge Team from Archbishop's House to supervise all documentation. Any parishioner is entitled to view their Parish's Records. Just ask....

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