Thursday, 3 August 2017


EVIL DEEDS

20 years after Brendan Smyth,

FACE OF EVIL: The iconic photograph by Steve Humphreys of paedophile priest Brendan Smyth being led from the Central Criminal Court 20 years ago

IT is high summer in Kilnacrott, Co Cavan. Not even the ominous evergreen trees that surround the one-time Norbertine house and its small graveyard can darken this glorious summer’s day.
On a country road near the village of Ballyjamesduff, Co Cavan, there is a grotto to the left of the entrance gates, but the statue of the Virgin Mary has been “removed for maintenance” and a sign declares that this is now a ‘Soul Sanctuary.’ Ignoring a garish blue sign tacked to one of the trees declaring ‘Private Grounds’, I cross a stile and walk up the pathway to where the most notorious paedophile in the Irish Catholic church’s sorry history of abuse is buried.
Apart from the distant drone of a tractor saving hay, there is a stillness and silence that belies the harsh reality of one man’s notorious life. Can you feel evil? Not on the short walk from the gate to the graveside.
To the left, is the large modern complex bearing a white cross that the priests deserted in 2015, leaving the building now known as Holy Trinity Abbey and, to the right, a rectangular formation of graves.
Each contains a headstone with the departed priest’s vital religious statistics: Born. Vested. Professed. Ordained. Died. Between these milestones of their lives, many of these men probably did a lot of good, but all that has been destroyed by the man whose grave I came to see.
It has no headstone, just an inscription in the polished dark limestone surround, with white crosses on either side inscribed: Brendan G. Smyth O.Praem 1927 to 1997 Rest in Peace. This innocuous monument contains the last remains of a man whose image came to embody the horror perpetrated by his ilk on the innocent. A man who hid out here in the idyllic Cavan countryside and who, on this day, July 23, 1997, on the eve of his sentencing, finally admitted his “sins against God, offences against individual persons and offences against the laws of the Church”.
A month later, he died of heart failure in the Curragh prison.
In the dead of night, his body was brought back to Kilnacrott and his fellow priests assembled in the church for Mass at 3.30am. Then, bathed in the headlights of the hearse, his coffin was lowered into this grave at 4.15am. Four gardai stood nearby in the shadows as dawn broke over the rolling countryside and Smyth was encased in concrete in his last resting place.
In life, he not only desecrated those around him, but the ripples from his activities sullied the reputation of Cardinal Sean Brady and swamped the government of Albert Reynolds.
Now, apart from the grave, all that remains of Brendan Smyth is the iconic image of him leering into the camera as he was led in handcuffs from the Central Criminal Court, a photograph that came to represent a scandalous era of clerical sex abuse.
Born John Gerard Smyth in Belfast on June 8, 1927, he was ordained a priest in 1945, changing his name to Brendan when he joined the Norbertine Order, also known as the Premonstratensians. He was to receive psychiatric treatment over the years, but nothing would stop his rampage of sex abuse against young boys and girls.
“Over the years of religious life, it could be that I have sexually abused between 50 and 100 children — that number could even be double or perhaps even more,” he told one doctor.
Perhaps even worse was that his crimes were known within his order and within the church in general. But he wasn’t reported to the RUC (much of his early abuse was in Belfast) or the gardai.
The Norbertine Order shielded and sheltered him, moving him to new parishes and different countries, knowing that he was a serial abuser, which allowed him to continue his appalling litany of crimes against children.
One Norbertine priest, Fr Bruno Mulvihill, made attempts to alert the church authorities. But the order to which he belonged was independent of the Diocese of Kilmore and the senior churchman in Ireland, the Archbishop of Armagh.
Although Cardinal Cahal Daly was privately furious about what he called the order’s “incompetence”, his successor Cardinal Sean Brady admitted in 1975 that, as a priest, he did his “duty” when he asked two victims of Smyth to swear an ‘oath of silence’ after testifying against him at a church inquiry.
He said he did so at the behest of the then-Bishop of Kilmore, Dr Francis McKiernan.
Arrested in 1991 by the RUC, Brendan Smyth fled across the border to Kilnacrott to await the next move in a game of cat and mouse.
Like a lot of disasters, the seeds of Albert Reynolds’ destruction began to emerge in two different places, but when they combined, it unleashed a political force that would topple the then Taoiseach.
As if mirroring more recent events, it began with judicial appointments. Reynolds, for some unfathomable reason, decided to appoint Liam Hamilton as Chief Justice and Harry Whelehan, then the Attorney General, as President of the High Court.
Determined to get his own way in the teeth of spirited opposition from his coalition partner Dick Spring, leader of the Labour Party, Reynolds’ obstinacy led to a very public squabble between the two men, who were travelling in different parts of the world at the time.
When they finally met, at Baldonnel Aerodrome in late September 1994, an ‘accord’ was reached to prevent an unwanted election, although Spring did not specifically agree to the appointment of Whelehan as President of the High Court.
Simultaneously, journalist Chris Moore had put together a frightening documentary on Fr Brendan Smyth and the cover-up that allowed him to abuse with impunity.
Broadcast on Thursday, October 6, 1994, the programme, Suffer Little Children, revealed among other things, that nine extradition warrants by the authorities in Northern Ireland had been lying in the Attorney General’s office in Dublin unprocessed on the desk of a senior official, Matty Russell, for seven months.
The Sunday Independent carried a front page story on the delay, written by Veronica Guerin, and as controversy raged about the issue, Spring’s advisor John Foley told his coalition counterpart Sean Duignan: “The priest changes everything.”
At a Cabinet meeting on November 10, Reynolds forced through the appointment of Harry Whelehan as President of the High Court and Spring and his ministers walked out as the Government teetered on the brink of collapse.
The days that followed were characterised by confusion in the Reynolds camp and hysteria in the corridors of power. There was a document “that will rock the foundations of this society to their very roots”, claimed Labour minister Pat Rabbitte.
“At the end of the day, when all other questions have been dealt with, one remains,” Spring told an emergency meeting of his parliamentary party.
“We have allowed a child abuser to remain at large in our community, when we had it in our power to ensure that he was given up to justice.”
As he furiously tried to save his government, Albert Reynolds told the Dail on November 15, 1994: “I must, today, explain the failure of a system in this specific case; a failure with ghastly and specific consequences for the children of the country.
“I must not excuse the failure: I must ensure that it never happens again.
“I will give this House a full and detailed report, but a full and detailed report of a failure in our method of dealing with such a crime as child sexual abuse will never and can never be satisfactory.”
He never got that chance. As the government unravelled, Labour Minister Ruairi Quinn told Reynolds: “We’ve come for a head, Harry’s or yours, it doesn’t look like we’re getting Harry’s.”
After his resignation on November 17, Albert Reynolds lingered in the Taoiseach’s seat in the Dail chamber until almost everybody had shaken his hand in commiseration.
Using a simple racing metaphor, he summed it up: “It’s amazing, you cross the big hurdles and when you get to the small ones, you get tripped up.”
Nearing the end of his fouryear sentence in Magilligan Prison, Smyth applied for parole. By now the case was getting the full attention of the Irish Attorney General, who successfully applied for Smyth’s extradition to the Republic.
In March 1997, he was flown from Derry to Dublin and stood trial on five specimen charges of child sex abuse at the Central Criminal Court.
On July 23, he made a public apology to his victims in a hand-written statement read to the court by his counsel Gemma Loughran.
On July 26, Judge Cyril Kelly asked and answered his own rhetorical question: “Is the defendant likely to re-offend?... in my view, yes,” and sentenced him to 12 years in prison.
Incarcerated in Arbour Hill Prison, Smyth was later moved to the Curragh in Kildare where he died of a heart attack on August 22 after collapsing in the prison yard. He was 70 years of age.
Kilnacrott Abbey and its 43 acres of land was put up for sale in 2008 with a price tag of €3m, but apart from the timing, on the cusp of the property collapse, who wanted to buy a property which contained the grave of one of the most notorious paedophiles we have ever seen?
Eventually, the estate was divided. The old abbey, a Tudor-Gothic building some of which dates from the early 1800s, is now The Cavan Centre, a “residential centre for education and community development” established in 1977.
When you pass the en- trance gates, it is clearly identified as private property “and not open to the public”.
A lay group calling itself Direction for Our Times, which has 400 prayer groups, including 35 in Ireland, paid €610,000 in 2012 for what is now called Holy Trinity Abbey, containing a large modern building, the graveyard and some surrounding land.
It took over Kilnacrott as a “site of pilgrimage” in August 2015, when the Norbertines finally left.
“The grave (of Brendan Smyth) can serve as a reminder for all of us of the enormous wounds of so many,” the group’s chaplain Fr Darragh Connolly was quoted as saying.
“We do not feel that these wounds should ever be forgotten or dismissed.”
As long as Kilnacrott stands, that won’t happen.
‘A failure with ghastly consequences for children’ ‘These wounds should never be forgotten or dismissed’

PAT SAYS:

Its hard to believe that it is 20 years since the Brendan Smyth affair caused outrage across Ireland and the world.

He was a truly evil man and seemed to have no remorse until the  end.

Yet his religious order - the Norbertines - gave him a full priest's burial in the middle of the night.

And people like Cardinal Sean Brady are still wandering around as if nothing had happened and they had no part to play in it.

If I was Sean Brady I would have retired into a private life.





But Brady still goes around dressed to the nines as a cardinal and is celebrating Confirmations and hanging around Rome and its functions as if nothing happened.

At the time Cahal Daly sacked me in 1986 he was allowing Brendan Smyth to minister in Belfast.


There are many clerics in the Church today as arrogant as ever in spite of what people like Smyth did - and in spite of the revelations about Maynooth and Grindr priests.

As we speak Amy Martin is protecting Eamon McCamley - the PP of Keady who was caught masturbating on line.




Have they no fear of God at All?

Have they no shame?

All that matters to them is that they protect each other and the corrupt system.

But ordinary people have lost all faith in them.

The abuse of children was their worst.

But there is so much more going on that they do not want you to know about.

This Blog will continue to inform you.

67 comments:

  1. Pat, an excellent blog and a very interesting but sad read. Cardinal Brady should hang his head in shame. From one Cavan man to another, protecting their own. What about that Priest (can't remember his name) who came on the Nolan Show asking for Brady to resign and the Priest resigned soon after and Brady finished his reputation

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  2. "Have they no shame?"

    Maybe someone could write about what shame really is- about making people feel they are less than everyone else

    Shame is a painful, social emotion that can be seen as resulting "...from comparison of the self's action with the self's standards...". but which may equally stem from comparison of the self's state of being with the ideal social context's standard. Thus, shame may stem from volitional action or simply self-regard; no action by the shamed being is required: simply existing is enough. Both the comparison and standards are enabled by socialization. Though usually considered an emotion, shame may also variously be considered an affect, cognition, state, or condition.

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    Replies
    1. You CAN'T "make people feel" anything!
      No-one can make you feel anything without your consent. They certainly can try,of course, but the fact remains - - your thoughts are your own responsibility. That seems tough but it is wonderfully empowering when you take time to carefully think about it!

      Delete
  3. Can this blog become any worse? As someone who suffered abuse by a neighbour and struggled for years to recover, I find the article today and the sinister, awful photo of B. Smyth very upsetting. It erupts a torrent of memories. Everytime this phito appears, I like many, many others have our pain, hurt and anger revived all over again. I am appalled this morning that you have so little regard for the effect this blog has on those of us who were abused. Shame, shame. I am sick again ....Pat, explain to me why????

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    Replies
    1. I too am a victim of abuse!

      We need to remember what these people did to stop it happening again.

      Delete
    2. How were you abused Pat? You do have a penchant for the dramatic.

      Delete
  4. Pat, you may huff and you may puff (pardon the pun) but you will not blow this house down. People are fully aware that many of those who serve as priests and bishops are frail men who to quote St. Paul "carry the treasures of God in earthen vessels" but their shared human experience generates both a common sense response and a continued faith in the church. I know the past 40 years offer fertile ground for muck rakers like yourself but those who love the church have moved on and are sowing the seeds of renewal and growth.
    So Pat, if it gives you pleasure to rejoice in the church's failings in Ireland - carry on; the people of God are no fools.
    Happy feast day of John Vianney - he has a lot to teach us. He was a true son of the church despite his sufferings.

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    Replies
    1. The people of God are leaving the pews steadily and that will continue as the older generation die out.

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    2. Pat, the people who leave the Church have a right to do so. It's sad but one thing is certain: THEY HAVEN'T GONE TO YOU - AND WON'T BE GOING TO LARNE ORATORY!! How you delight in stirring up news stories that are very upsetting for all who have been abused and are trying to move in in their lives....shameful of you today.. May God bless your mind.

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    3. You sound like a Priest, Father

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  5. What kind of burial is a full priest's burial and what else would you have recommended?

    Funeral Masses are to ask God's forgiveness.

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    Replies
    1. A funeral away from the monastery and cremation - and not a grave and headstone to commemorate him as a "religious".

      Delete
    2. I'm afraid there are a number of problems with this approach.

      First, you seem to be saying it would be more appropriate to have a funeral Mass for him as a lay secular person and not as a religious. According to this view the dignity of a religious would be too good for him so he should be treated as a layperson. There are lots of issues about this way of looking at things. The first one is it's a form of clericalism.

      Secondly, you'd prefer cremation to burial since, as you argue, burial is too good for him but creation would be acceptable. This view is not far from the medieval position that lay behind burning people, including heretics. The idea was that if the body/corpse is annihilated there will be nothing left on the Last Day for the soul to rejoin - and therefore the burnt person will not have a chance of eternal life - just in case God might be to merciful and want the person to be admitted to heaven.

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    3. Pat,

      I am sorry to hear you were abused as a child.

      No one should ever suffer like you do.
      I also was a victim of abuse. It is still painful and the pain can strike at any minute.

      Might what happened to you account for your anger against the church? Authority? Eamon Martin?

      There is a lot of angry expressed on this blog.
      Is it your way of getting back at your abuser?

      Concerned PP

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    4. You seem to be excusing the abuse of Children by Smyth. Are you his relative?

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    5. Dear Concerned PP, my abuser had no connection with the church.

      If I am angry it's over corruption and abuse within the Church.

      In general I am not an angry man as those who know me will tell you.

      I am actually very laid back and have a good sense of humour.

      Delete
    6. All of us have anger within us.

      There is a healthy way and a destructive way to express.

      Would you agree that the Church you mention is the Roman Catholic Church, the church you were part of, as opposed to the Independent Catholic Church, the church you set up, or the Anglican, Reformed, Pentecostal Church?

      Also would you agree you focus on clergy and seminarians and not on lay people who sin?

      Dublin PP

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    7. It would be useful Pat to speak about the enormous good being done by the Catholic Church. Your outpourings only inspire a vile hatred towards The Church. Your blog heading THINKING CATHOLICISM is completely misleading. There's very little, if any, of anything uplifting on this blog or any contribution to evoke real reform or change. It's all about judgment, name calling, much harmful innuendo and lacks balance. Recently it has become repetitive, predictable, tiresome and all about Pat's anger......do you have any time left for compassion, caring, doing something worthwhile?

      Delete
    8. 16.45 Dublin PP, Yes I was part of the Roman denomination. What I experienced within that, especially from hierarchy and clergy, greatly disillusioned me and convinced me it was NOT the church Christ intended.

      We are all sinners. But just like pre Reformation, it is the clergy who give most scandal making me believe that the RC system and many of its officials are terribly corrupt.

      "To whom much is given, much is expected". No?

      Delete
    9. 17.11 There is a simple lesson here, very simple. If you don't like what you Read, why read it for heaven's sake? Simple.

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    10. Sorry, but it is anything but your "simple"!

      Delete
  6. Read about Cardinal Brady unable to resign on BBC website. A priest spoke on The Nolan Show against Brady and he resigned soon after. His name was Eamon Murray, Brady made sure he wasn't touched by another diocese. This was after he spoke out about Brady.

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    Replies
    1. Cardinal was willing to resign claims D"Arcy says the BBC headline if googled. The Priest who spoke out was rubbished by Brady. He doesn't speak out about it.

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  7. 20 years is a long time. Full burial or not is irrelevant. Masses and prayer do not control God. I'm sure there are bodies dumped around the world nobody knows about. These people are not far from God because appropriate rituals were not followed. What about the tuam babies. What dignity were they shown. As for Smyth he has left our jurisdiction. Thing is do we trust God to act appropriately whatever His decision is. Often times we project our joys and sorrows onto God but the bottom line is we are not in charge. Here on Earth we work for justice in so far as we can

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  8. Pat Buckley. I daren't call you Bishop as you do not represent the truths of the Cathic Church. You make up your rules as it suits you. Very few bloggers today! Has your cohort left for holidays? That aside, could you not for once think about how that frightening photo of B. Smith may affect those abused by him? Everytime papers and TV use it they resurrect all over again the awful, almost irremoveable memory of their experiences. Already today I have expressed my outrage at you re: photo and how it destroys my pathway to healing. You haven't as yet given me a reasonable, acceptable answer. Leads me to believe, like many other scandals of the Church, you, Pat, use all of them to pour out your anger and vengance, as if to get even. That attitude stinks for abused people. Give me some intelligible reply.

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    Replies
    1. You have had your say.

      All of us who were abuse "victims" need to become abuse "survivors".

      I do understand it's harder for some than others.

      But it's the only way to stop your abuser having power over you?

      Delete
    2. Check out google bishop Pat - audioboom priest shocked and saddened- Fr Eamon Murray attacks Cardinal Sean. No wonder why this Priest is not touched by another bishop.

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    3. I know Brady was angry with Dr Murray. At the time he told another priest he had added his name to his "black book"!

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    4. Arlene's on fire.4 August 2017 at 18:08

      Although Fr Eamon Murray is from Magherafelt, he is a priest of Northampton diocese, so well outside the purview of the Wounded Healer. Fr Murray was one of the UK's youngest PPs, appointed at the age of 32.

      Delete
    5. I think Fr Murray is back now in his native Northern Ireland if I'm correct. His name is toxic and Sean Brady has made sure of that. From what I hear of him he is a quiet true person.

      Delete
  9. Pat, this Priest has had a lot of bad health.

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    Replies
    1. Pat, if Brady has a black book then that is inexcusable. Dublin PP

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    2. Are you suggesting Fr McCamley has committed a crime? If not, maybe time you minded your own business and stop trying to link his name to abusers like Smyth.

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    3. Fr McCamley has committed no crime. But his sinful actions online show him unfit for the priesthood. He may also be mentally unstable if he thought he could pull his wire on the internet and not be recognised!

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    4. 20.45 couldn't agree more.

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    5. Why do Bishops in Armagh Pat defend naughty sexual priests to the hilt but quieten gentle kind priests. I can't understand that. Why is McCamley in Keady being covered up whilst a quiet shy man is being demonized?

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    6. 20.45
      No e of ur business.

      Delete
  10. I just listened to that Priest interview with Nolan, he sounds a sincere man with integrity. I find it very harsh he was punished for speaking his mind. What a horrible man is Brady.

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  11. Listen to this straight talking Priest, audioboom. Talks to Nolan. - audioboom Priest challenges UUP politician over Pope visit to Belfast. Brady has since made him quiet.

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  12. Actually as a survivor of clerical abuse myself, this is the post on this blog which has meant most to me. It has spoken the truth of what I have experienced most of any post here. But it seems that a number of people are still not getting what abuse does.
    Those reading this and thinking that Pat has a lot of anger in him should realise that this is because of the multiple traumas he has experienced at the hands of the church (sorry to speak for you Pat, but I'm sure you'll correct my view if you see it differently). Readers of this blog need to understand that the effect of abuse is to prevent a person living their life on whatever level.
    At this point there are probably people thinking that I should get over it. If you don't understand that on some level you can NEVER get over abuse, you will never understand what an abuse survivor has gone through, and never understand the way it has far-reaching effects into all parts of your life for, probably, the rest of your life.
    You also have to understand that after abuse, everything is seen differently and in the light of that abuse. For example, my relationship with my own mother fell apart because I COULD NOT 'move on' from the fact that she didn't believe me when I told her I was being abused. I now consider myself well into recovery from my abuse, but you have to understand that part of this recovery is that I have not seen my mother for many years. You also have to understand that the reason for that is that she minimises her role in my abuse.
    If being abused can have such far-reaching effects in the closest relationship in a person's life, you then have to understand its effects in ones relationship with the INSTITUTION which allowed and protected this abuse. I walk past a Catholic church regularly and every time I feel sick at the thought of a Catholic church, and that one is one with no associations for me. Even decades after my abuse the very thought of the INSTITUTION which allowed this is sick-making.
    If you don't understand that attempting to divert attention to the 'good' the abusive institution does is actually diverting attention FROM the abuse, you will never be able to understand the effect abuse has on a person. If you don't understand that a religious being given a religious funeral is re-abusing his victims, you are really not listening. If you don't understand that the bishops who have hidden all this are COMPLICIT in the suicide of abuse targets, you are not getting it.
    So here's the way ahead. It is for the survivors of abuse to do the forgiving. Similarly it is for the survivors to decide what recovery means. People who have not suffered clerical abuse need to shut up and recognise that they are not allowing the survivors to have the power. Abuse is taking power away from someone and recovery is therefore the person claiming the power back, and having the power over their life. It is having the power to decide whether or when you will forgive your abuser, whether or when you will take legal action over it, and whether the perpetrators and facilitators can be allowed to forget it for one moment. Because you all also need to understand that to get to recovery takes years of nightmares, flashbacks, drinking, and there are a lot of us who never get there at all. Unless you allow the targets of abuse to hold the power and ownership over their abuse and its long-term effects in their life, you are yourself an abuser.
    I am grateful for Pat's comment that there is more to come out, because exposure is the only way further abuse can be prevented. Mark my words, only what has been forced out into the open is out in the open. Most abuse targets NEVER tell anyone. Because they can't. Because they're lives are too screwed up permanently, so they move from job to job, from partner to partner, from substance to substance.

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    Replies
    1. Powerful comment. Well said.

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    2. Well said indeed. Pat I think some of those abuse survivors attacking you might be only pretending.

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    3. Yes. Fake victims using cover to attack.

      Delete
    4. Anon at 18.09: A powerful contribution and one which deserves respect and to be reflected on very seriously, the kind if insights that are intelligent, sincere and challenging. I too experienced abuse by a neighbour and kept it hidden all my life but in more recent years received professional support. I empathise with you. I blogged about this today and the point I made is that evetytime any news outlet uses B. Smith's photo in particular, including this blog, nemories cascade and remain. I still think Pat uses the appalling abuse committed by B. S in a way, not to initiate positive support for survivors and to offer a genuine forum for listening, but to continue his contempt for the Church. That gets us nowhere in our journey of healing and potential for new beginnings. As you said, it is for survivors to do the forgiving and to decide what recovery means. I agree wholeheartedly. However,the comments allowed by Pat today and his own, sometimes disingenuous responses do not help. I thankfully have made my peace with the Church and I appreciate it's not possible for all to do likewise. All the best in your life.

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  13. Check out audioboom Priest challenges UUP Politician over Pope visit to Belfast on the Nolan Radio Show. Fr Eamon is now sidelined. What a lovely man.

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    Replies
    1. I did some research today. Father Murray is a priest in good standing of Northampton diocese in England. He is currently on sick leave due to cardiac problems.

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    2. Is it true Pat, Archbishop Eamon wont touch another Eamon because of his on air outburst over the Wounded Healer.

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    3. Father Murray has a bishop and diocese in England. Why would he need Any Martin or any Irish bishop?

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    4. Maybe that's his rescue Bishop Pat, an English diocese as opposed to an Irish one. I feel for him. I wish I knew him, sounds a very hurt person.

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    5. Fr Murray seems wise - English diocese and not an Irish one.

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  14. Fr Murray was discredited by Brady and he's a total gentleman. He refuses to speak out about his ordeal to anyone. Perhaps that explains the man's poor health.

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  15. Or perhaps he's a loyal priest who doesn't regard himself as Superior to everyone else. In the manner of the Cure if Ars.

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    Replies
    1. If you knew Fr Eamon he wouldn't say boo to a goose. A lovely kind man,I didn't know Brady and Armagh had made him suffer so much.

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    2. Unjustified comment on what St John Vianney "felt",

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  16. Pat, this story about Fr Murray is upsetting. Do you know the real story? I know his family and he is a quiet shy person. I didn't know this happened to him, I think it's disgraceful. What are other Priests going through that we don't know about. Maghera Mother

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  17. Pat, how can we reach out to Fr Murray? He seems to be suffering in silence! Does he live back in Magherafelt with his parents? Why does he not speak out more?

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    Replies
    1. You can contact him at bishops house, Northampton. The address will be on the internet.

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    2. Thanks Pat.

      Delete
  18. Pat I'm in the pub with my friends waiting for your blog to be updated. Hurry up! We can't wait much longer! Any more RC institution filth?

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    Replies
    1. Find more productive ways to enjoy your leisure. What you say shows a shallow existence.

      Delete
  19. Pat,My name is Deirdre and i had to comment given recent events in Keady. I don't have an inbuilt gay-dar but i could have told you the first time I saw Mc Camley that he was gay. Being Gay is not the problem, it is the hiding behind the collar enunciating Gods word (in theory) while choking the chicken on line that is my problem. Be gay if you want but don't join the priesthood in order that you can secure a healthy lifestyle by deceit. I am of the belief that there is something fundamentally wrong with a person who wants to join an order where sex is prohibited, sex is the most natural instinct in human beings. I suppose my thoughts are this, i blame people like Mc Camley and more especially pedophile priests for my lapsed religious views. They could not be further from God, neither could the people who support or condone their actions. The countless lives destroyed by pedophile scum wearing a collar makes me physically sick and i hope if there is a God, the pedophile priests see the faces of all the children they have violated as they die. As for Mc Camley , he will be on vacation working out with the Bishop a parish suitably distanced where people wont know him. Can i inform him that it doesn't matter where he goes, he will take his conscience with him, (subject to finding a conscience). As for any pedophile priests out there and you know who you are, i hear there are some positions available in hell, please apply. Pat i thank you for your continued integrity and pursuance of truth

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    Replies
    1. MourneManMichael5 August 2017 at 13:15

      That seems like your first comment to the blog Deirdre. A sensible balanced viewpoint. Welcome.
      MMM

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    2. An appalling medley of contradictions and association Agnostic D.

      First fallacy: associating same-sex attraction and pedophilia.

      Second problem: contradictory views on gay people, compounded by derisory comments on the priest in question.

      Delete
    3. Agnostic D - you have confused so many thoughts and facts - you are all mixed up and too used to stereotyping. Pat loves people like you who don't want to be fair & balanced or who don't research information properly and comprehensively. Sound bites are easier. Anon at 19.02 is correct.

      Delete
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