Tuesday, 1 August 2017

FATHER BERNARD LYNCH

Blog readers have been asking for the last tow days about Father Bernard Lynch and wanted to know more about him.

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Bernard Lynch was born in Ireland in 1947. His father worked for the local railway making deliveries by horse and cart of goods from the train station around the market town of Ennis capital of County Clare. Clare is on Europe’s most western Atlantic coast. The land there is rocky and not arable, where Oliver Cromwell famously said, “there is no earth to bury a man, no water to drown a man and no tree to hang a man.”  Bernard was educated at the Christian Brothers' School and developed an interest in the Catholic priesthood at a very early age.  He began serving as an altar boy in the local parish Church when only eight years old.

In his teens he sought admission to the Redemptorist Fathers' secondary school in Limerick to pursue a religious vocation. He was rejected because his family could not afford the fees. After graduating from the Christian Brothers school in 1965 he joined the Society of African Missions (SMA). After one year studying ascetical theology at the SMA novitiate in Cloughballymore County Galway, he was admitted to major seminary in Northern Ireland twenty six miles from Belfast.  There he spent six years studying philosophy and theology.

During his first year of seminary he became friends with Alex; a relationship that became physically affectionate the following year. The two of them went to Liverpool during their third summer, where they worked in a factory to earn money to support their studies. 

 They took lodgings together in a boarding house. Bernard felt some guilt about the growing intimacy of the relationship and so confessed his concerns to the local priest. The priest insisted he cease all physical relations and report the fact that he had engaged in mutual masturbation with Alex to the seminary authorities. Returning to seminary, 

Bernard chose to speak with Fr. Jeremy Mullins a professor of Christology.  Although he would later learn of Mullin's conflict over his own sexuality, the priest ordered Lynch to cease all studies for the priesthood. A week later, Mullins relented and offered Bernard and Alex a second chance. Alex eventually grew so conflicted over his relationship with Bernard that he left the seminary in the spring of 1971. Bernard was broken-hearted but also saw that this new situation made it possible for him to commit anew to celibacy.

In June 1971, Lynch was ordained deacon and on December 20, 1971, he was ordained priest at Saint Coleman's Cathedral Newry. After completing his theological studies, he was sent to Ndola, Zambia. Lynch immersed himself into the life of the mission, but grew increasingly concerned over the attitude of some of the priests toward the Africans. After two years he shared his dissatisfaction with his Superiors and returned to Ireland to reconsider his ministry and vocation.

In the following months, Lynch came out as gay to another priest. His Superior suggested he go to the U.S. to pursue graduate studies and reflect on his vocation rather than return to Africa. Lynch arrived in New York City in August 1975. He was assigned to Saint Gabriel's parish in the Bronx and enrolled at Fordham University in the Master's program in counselling Psychology. He completed this degree in 1977.

During this time Lynch was invited to celebrate Mass for a fellow student who had committed suicide. After the Requiem he met members of Dignity New York and learned that the deceased student was gay. He agreed to come and say mass for Dignity at the Church of the Good Shepherd, behind Lincoln Centre. Dignity was meeting in this non Catholic Church because the Archdiocese would not allow them in Catholic facilities. Lynch met and soon became good friends with Fr. John McNeill and Robert Carter, SJ, and with them became leaders of Dignity.

His superiors agreed to allow Bernard to stay in the U.S. to pursue a doctorate on the condition that he pay his own tuition fees and expenses. He secured a position as Campus Minister and teacher at Mount Saint Michael's Academy in the North East Bronx. At the same time he enrolled at New York Theological Seminary in lower Manhattan to study in the Doctor of Ministry programme;  he completed the degree in 1980.

On a trip home to Ireland in 1978 he met again with Fr. Jeremy Mullins who confided that he was struggling with his sexuality. Even with Lynch's counsel, Mullins became increasingly conflicted and unhappy and finally took a leave of absence from his Religious Order and moved to New York in the summer of 1981. Lynch helped Jeremy find an apartment and got him a position as Freshman Counsellor at Mount Saint Michal Academy. By 1983 it was evident that Mullins was having health problems. He moved to Boston to teach in the SMA seminary but was soon hospitalized and grew more seriously ill. Mullins went to Florida Christmas 1983 to be with his brother Bruce, also a priest. After the holidays, Lynch out of the blues was told by Father Bruce that he was to have no further contact with Jeremy. Jeremy subsequently died and Bernard was refused permission to attend his funeral by Bruce who threatened to ‘have the police evict him if he as much showed his face’ at the funeral of his former mentor, confessor and dear friend. Bruce blamed Bernard for Jeremy’s death from AIDS.  


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1984 was a tumultuous year for gay people in New York City. AIDS was sweeping through the community with hundreds of people sick and dying.  Bernard was in the midst of the holocaust and had founded the city’s first AIDS Ministry programme at Dignity New York in 1982. Soon he was drafted onto the mayor of New York’s – Edward Koch – task force on AIDS. Six hundred of Dignity’s own membership died at this time. Conflict between Dignity and the Archdiocese of New York was exacerbated especially when Cardinal Ratzinger issued his famous ‘Halloween letter’ in 1986 calling gay people ‘disordered in their nature’ and ‘evil’ in their love. Cardinal O’Connor expelled Dignity from all Church property and to add to the crisis Fr. Bruce Mullins, Jeremy’s brother, came on a crusade to New York from his diocese in Florida distributing flyers outside Mount Saint Michael's Academy condemning Lynch’s ministry. Three of the faculty out of a total of sixty-five, formed a group called S.A.F.E. This is an aphorism for Students Against Faggotts in Education. Aided and abetted by the Archdiocesan authorities they harassed Lynch and eventually pressurised the school administration to force Father Lynch’s resignation on December 20, 1984.

 However, Lynch became more visible and vocal as the AIDS pandemic worsened. He testified in New York City Council on a bill granting rights on employment and housing without regard to sexual orientation to protect those most vulnerable with the virus from losing their jobs and being evicted onto the streets. He made a TV documentary on his AIDS Ministry with Channel Four from the United Kingdom. After the infamous Ratzinger letter was released by the Vatican, Lynch was denied canonical rights by the Archdiocese for refusing to give up his ministry to the sick and dying. This effectively banned him from serving as a priest in the U.S. and left him without any source of income.  In June 1987 he was ordered to Rome for sabbatical leave and to reflect on his future.    

While still in Europe he received word that criminal charges were being filed against him in New York for the alleged sexual abuse of a former 14-year-old student at Mount Saint Michael's. The media coverage that followed was widespread and salacious in the U.S. and in Ireland. Lynch and those closest to him immediately smelt a rat. They already knew that the Archdiocese was out to get him. The Archdiocese had tried unsuccessfully to have him deported and sent back to Africa.  Lynch secured legal counsel and prepared against the advice of his legal counsel to return to New York City to face the charges. His advisors warned him that he was up against the two most formidable institutions in the world: The Catholic Church and the F.B.I. He arrived in the city on June 28, 1988, to find strong support among his many friends and colleagues. It was evident that officials in the archdiocese supported the prosecution and were highly instrumental in bringing it about.

The trial opened in the South Bronx on April 18, 1989. A full account of the trial is given in "A Priest on Trial" which Lynch wrote and published in the U.K. (Bloomsbury 1993). The case against him hinged solely on the testimony of one student, John Schaefer, who admitted under cross examination that he had been forced to testify against his will by the F.B.I. He produced a letter showing how he was lied to by the police authorities and told that he would never have to take the stand if he made the false allegation against Father Lynch. He also had a civil suit for five million dollars against his former priest. The case collapsed. The judge – the Honourable Burton Robert’s—refused to simply dismiss the case. In light of the evidence before him the judge took the unusual step of exonerating Lynch finding him not guilty of all the charges.

In 1990 Father Lynch received the AIDS National Interfaith Network Award for Outstanding Contribution to HIV/AIDS Ministries. Lynch subsequently took a leave of New York and moved to London to work with an ecumenical AIDS counselling group in 1992. There he became the first minister of any religion to march in the LGBT parade in July of that same year. He founded the first support group for Catholic gay priests in the Archdiocese of Westminster London.  This group celebrates its twentieth anniversary in 2012. In 1996 the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence canonized Lynch outside Westminster Cathedral. In 2008 he was honoured with the Lesbian & Gay Christian Movement reward for "Longstanding Work and Witness" to LGBT persons and people with HIV/AIDS. 
Ireland the land of his birth honoured him with the Magnus Hirchfeld Award in Dublin in 1986. Again in 1995 he was amongst the first ever openly gay priest to be welcomed to the Palace of the President by Her Excellency Mary Robinson, President of Ireland.  In 2008 he was honoured by his own home County Clare by being listed in the top twenty most famous people of all time. Over the years Fr. Lynch has conducted numerous blessings and weddings of same-gender couples.


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In 1998, he and his life partner, Billy Desmond, had their relationship publicly blessed. In 2007, they became legally married as the first Catholic priest and partner in a civil partnership. Father Lynch continues his work, writings and ministry in the LGBT and HIV/AIDS community to the present day. His book If It Wasn't Love: Sex, Death and God was published by Circle Books in 2012. 

(This biographical statement drafted from information in the book, "A Priest on Trial," with additional info provided by Bernard Lynch.)

Additional Resources

AIDS: A Priest's Testament: http://ow.ly/Dnle7
This compelling documentary shot for Channel 4 in the summer of 1987 tells the story of Fr. BernárdLynch and his ministry to people with AIDS in New York. The Irish born priest and psychotherapist was closely involved with the LGBT community and founded the first pastoral outreach to people with AIDS in the city. He was subsequently drafted onto the Mayor of New York's Task Force on AIDS. His ministry and his commitment to civil rights for LGBT people led him into conflict with the Catholic Church authorities as well as bringing him into the most harrowing situations; preparing young people for their untimely deaths. The documentary profiles the man, his ministry and the pressures that brought him close to the edge of his physical and spiritual limits.  (Conor McAnally, Director.)

A Priest on Trial: http://ow.ly/DnkZr   
This documentary film was made in 1992 and charts the savage attempt to silence the ministry of Fr. Bernárd Lynch. An openly gay priest in the Roman Catholic Church, Fr. Lynch was given an ultimatum by the Vatican and falsely accused of paedophilia. The accuser, John Schaefer admitted at Trial in the Bronx Supreme Court, that he had been forced against his will to bring the charges.The judge, Justice Burton Roberts, not only dismissed the charges and berated the politically motivated prosecutors from the District Attorney's office, but dramatically and fiercely declared Lynch wholly innocent.This film -- with live footage from the Trial -- is a vital testimony to the lengths that some will go to silence truth, love and compassion, with lies, hate and the abuse of power. (Conor McAnally, Director.)

Soul Survivorhttp://youtu.be/P8kG9kGQ8CE
In 1986, Father Bernárd Lynch was immersed in the AIDS pandemic in New York City. During an interview about his ministry on World AIDS Day of that same year, in Ireland, he denied he was gay. This he later described as "the greatest sin I ever committed". This documentary made by Channel 4 in 1989 'to correct the lie', traces the personal struggle of this remarkable priest to come out at a time when homosexuality was still a criminal offence in Ireland. The truth cost him his job. He was never allowed licence to earn his living by the Catholic Church. With outstanding courage and dignity his father stands with him in the third of three personal profiles by Channell 4. (Conor McAnally, Director.)

PAT SAYS:

I greatly admire Bernard for his personal integrity, the sufferings he has endured and the decades of work he has undertaken.

In the beginning, he found it difficult to accept and publicly acknowledge who he was - but then got the courage.

His religious order was quite good to him in spite of all the pressure they came under from the Vatican.

Eventually he became free of all shackles and carved out his own life and ministry - while also forming a meaningful, loving and committed relationship with a life long partner.

Bernard Lynch is an example of what a priest can do openly and with integrity if he is gay.

There is life outside clerical Roman Catholicism.

70 comments:

  1. Listening to the midnight news tonite.
    A group of priests went into a pub to celebrate an ordination in Cardiff and were told...no stag parties allowed.

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    1. 1.08 Im sure there is a message in here somewhere..
      People like Fr Lynch need a common forum where they can pool resources. One person here and another there seems to hide their existence. Perhaps this is what the official church hopes. They will eventually fizzle out. Perhaps this is their hope for you too Pat.

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    2. Very wise pub landlord, I say!

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    3. 11.36 Smacks of the Fr Teds I think

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  2. Bernárd Lynch is a good and wise priest, one of the very, very few. Like all such, he was treated shamefully by those whose spirit was more Pharisaical than Christ-like.

    Men like Lynch are prophets in today's world.

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    1. Hahaha, prophet for whom? You truly are a Pharisee. Well, at least Pharisees were trying to live according to the Torah. You merely spout sh1te you read on the journal.ie!

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    2. I take it you know the man, given your dogmatic dismissiveness of him?

      Er, I'm not the one talkin' 'sh1te' (sic) here. (Whatever 'sh1te' is.)

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  3. Fr Lynch is an icon and a person of integrity. He supports gay priests and people to live their lives without any judgement or fear.
    His ministry to people with AIDS is so courageous. May the Lord grant him many years of happiness and good health to continue his good work.

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  4. I am not knocking him, but it seems priests in general have very complicated lives... even compared with non-religious gays.

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  5. What would Fr Lynch think of priests like Rory and McCamley and priests on Grinder and masturbating on line I wonder. Just asking? Would he approve? What advice would he give them? Armagh Mother.

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  6. @1.08 It's a great story about the priests in the pub. I was glad that it gave people a laugh.

    Fr Lynch is the most open-minded and supported person I have ever met. He helped me in how I see myself as a sexual person, there was no judgement from him. His approach is one of care and compassion.
    I think this was from his own experience of receiving very harsh treatment from the public mob who were out to stone him during a painful and difficult time of his life. Thankfully he would never throw stones at anyone.
    I remember he told me to feel the gay love of the Lord in my life and be proud of who I am. Imagine such a wonderful and loving statement coming from a priest. My wish is that I could be more like him.
    Gay PP

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    1. "The gay love of the Lord". Can you explain that please?

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    2. God does not love us with gay, straight, bisexual or trans live. God loves us with God's love. "The gay love of the Lord". Modern psycho bullshit!

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    3. 11:06, I'm afraid it isn't that smelly stuff.

      You, like so many homophobes, have reduced gay love purely to sexual attraction and the physical expression of this. It is why Church teaching on homosexuality is so skewed and in urgent need of revision.

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    4. I am very glad to @10:53.
      When I was growing up in Ireland it was a straight person's world. Homosexual activity was illegal. There was silence about being gay in society. All we had to go on was the 'Love that dare not speak it's name'. it was a total heteronormative culture.
      In modern Irish society, how things have changed! We have gay characters on TV, gay marriage, even a gay Taoiseach! Who from my generation could have believed we would see these changes?
      I also believe that Irish people are very open to having gay priests and sexually active gay priests. The days of shaming people because of their sexuality are over.
      Yet, the way that I see love is still like the straight love/heteronormative culture that I grew up in.
      I came to see that God gave me my gay sexuality, and I am celibate, but still to thank God for my gayness and let go of my shame.
      I feel open to let priests be themselves, I do not judge them or try to shame them and I think that is a great gift that Fr Bernard gave to me.

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    5. The "gay" ideology is almost entirety about physical attraction and unbridled lust, MC. It's about doing whatever you want, with whoever you like, as often as you desire! And if you think otherwise, you are living in cloud cuckoo land. You see it 'in your face' at these so-called "gay pride" events. It's mostly about promiscuous sex and well dare anyone try to tell them what they can and cannot do - certainly not anyone referring them to God and His Word. Sex today, heterosexual and homosexual, is pure licentiousness.

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    6. It's not what it's about, but it's about what it has become.

      I agree with you on Pride...up to a point.

      I suppose it's the fest equivalent of giving heteronormative society the two-fingered gesture, for all those years of homophobic oppression; I wouldn't take it too seriously.

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  7. An inspired reader. Thank you for sharing Pat

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  8. Ah lads come on, I know we like to push the boundaries and all, but I highly doubt that Jesus thought it was a good idea for His priests to be riding men women or children. Given how His Father is rather Old Testament, I doubt He approves of the bullsh1t that is running rife in the world. Roll on J Day. Boom boom boom.

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  9. I'm sorry Pat but this is exactly the kind of person you've been trying to expose. He's a hypocrite. He stayed in seminary despite knowing he was 'breaking the rules'. He was an active homosexual despite making a vow of perpetual continence and celibacy.

    I understand why you would admire him, but he's still a hypocrite. Why not leave seminary when he knew he wasn't 'compatible'? Why not leave priesthood when he wasn't 'playing by the rules'? It's all well and good pointing the finger at the 'RC institution' and their rules and teachings, but why profess publicly to being a minister of the Church but believe and live contrary to the Church's teaching?

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    1. Very simply. Because the rule is wrong. And change from inside happens before outside.

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    2. 11:01, seriously? 'Breaking the rules'? If you joined a club whose rules stated 'No Blacks', 'No Jews', 'No Irish', would you feel morally bound to keep them (because they were formed by a committee of crusty old men), or to challenge them?

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    3. He is no better than the priests exposed on this blog, pardon the pun. In fact what he has done is arguably worse. Pat holds him up as a model but it is totally wrong.

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    4. The 10 Commandments are a bunch of old rules that have no bearing in your lovely liberal utopia magna? Hahaha, you are some craic. Yes the code laws of Hammurabi before you start with your Wikipedia phd.

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    5. No one but you, 11:44, mentioned the Commandments.

      Why don't you discipline that unruly mind of yours? I'm sure you're old enough at least to try to stay on topic.

      As for the relevance of the Hammurabi Code to my comment... Nah! I'm not gonna even try.

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  10. I take it you know all priests Magna?

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  11. These blogs are getting like gay blogs....gay boys letting all hang out.
    Until celibacy is banned let's us have all our priests live in the image of Christ.
    TBH I'm sick reading here now....Barney lynch or no barney lynch.
    His story is very much flowered up.Poor Fr Bruce

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  12. I do not uphold Bernard as a model.

    I uphold his integrity in leaving the institution and living and working to his conscience.

    He could have stayed in and been a Grindr priest?

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    1. You are holding him up as a model. When the opposite is what he is. Another scumbag who betrayed Christ.

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    2. Correct me if I am wrong, but what you are trying to show us in these last few days, Pat, is that there are many ways to serve the Lord.
      And what I think Sean is saying at 11.09 is that to move forward in the Church/gay community what is needed is healthy and mature discussion and debate, and that given your experience and expertise in this area over many years, Pat, you are a person who could facilitate this conversation, maybe at your Independent Church....
      How is the Independent Church coming along, Pat? It's a while since we heard anything about it.
      Celibate Religious Priest

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  13. Talk about wanting your cake and eating it. Why is he allowed to break the rules so blatantly while other priests are dismissed. He's a total hypocrite and should be an Episcopalian. The SMA's spent $75,000 (a lot then) on his legal defence, money presumably that had been donated for the missions.

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    1. So, you would rather an innocent man be thrown to the wolves than struggle to support him?

      Isn't this how Jesus' disciples thought about him when the chips were down? And isn't this why Judas Iscariot took that bribe?

      How much would it take for you to follow suit? Anything?

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    2. God is a gentleman through and through/ And in all probability Episcopal too.

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  14. Any Priests or Religious going to gay pride in Belfast on Saturday? A group of us will be there. We are there to support our brothers and sisters in the LGBT community and to support each other who serve within the Church. Fr X

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    1. 12.33: There's a bus leaving Larne Oratory at noon on Sat. Should be a full bus and good fun is promised. Oh, for a jolly good time... You're welcome.....

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  15. There was a great piece on RTE radio on Noirin Ni Riain, the singer who got herself ordained a priest at the weekend. She'll still a Catholic and all. I forget the name of the Church, I think it was in London. She said she will bless and marry gay couples. She is divorced herself. Ireland we have come a long way!

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    1. 12:40
      "... Come a long way ..."
      Not gone a long way backwards???

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    2. She's no longer a Catholic and she's no more a priest than my pet cat!

      That old spook has been around caterwauling for years - pampered and enabled by those so-called "monks" of Glenstal - with her shrieking aul voice as Gaeilge - scare the life outa ye!

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  16. Barney has a lot of talent
    He is a good man
    But I don't think of him an an example for our gay decons
    Nor do I think much of those decons who went out drinking in their clerical gear.
    Surely for one night they could have stayed at home
    It was an ordination
    Bet they out drinking every nite in their denims.

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  17. So what's the latest on Mc camley ?
    are the Keady people protecting him?
    Will he show up in the t makem centre for the Holley ?

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  18. Magna at 8.46: So Bernard Lynch is one of the few good ones. Really!! Open your eyes from behind your misty drunkenness. There are some wonderfully good priests in our communities, men who give selflessly, caringly and compassionately. Very often their dedication to their parishioners is unnoticed but the majority of our clergy are essentially good human beings. That should be acknowledged and there are often quiet prophets among them....Mags, open wide your eyes....

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    1. "Our clergy is Essentially good human beings". This is based on what exactly? If that is true how do you account for the masturbating online McCamley, Rory Coyle, McVeigh, Joe Quinn, Fr X and that other County Louth Priest who's keeping low beyond the radar. Not to mention the antics of the wounded healer Brady and the red hatted weasel Cahal B.

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    2. Who is this Fr. X guy.
      Nobody made any effort to protect Coyle, McCamley etc.
      I wonder - does he even exist!

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    3. It's easy to 'explain' as you say.

      They are caught in a time warp between an institution which isn't keeping up with the developments in sexuality and their own desires and needs.

      They want to be ordained, and currently the rules are that those who seek ordination have to be celibate. Daft, I know.

      Hence their frustration and it's release in ways that are not wholesome.

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  19. Pat I think this post is factually inaccurate. Is it not the case that you are the first Catholic Priest to be in a civil partnership?

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    1. Pat, are you in a civil partnership? I never knew! Maybe you could tell us more about it. We never see you and your partner together?

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  20. FR X @12.33 I see the Police are going to take part in pride on Sat in their uniform. There was great coverage on the radio this morning about it.
    Why are they doing it? According to Deputy Chief Constable Drew Harris, the PSNI's objective in participating in Saturday's parade was to show support for a community that suffers a "disproportionate" number of hate crime attacks and to reflect the diversity of the police's workforce.
    I believe there is a disproportionate amount of attacks against gay priests on this blog, and fair play to the police for being so mature about their stance on the issue of participating in Pride.
    Dromore PP

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    1. "Participating" in the parade is the euphemism we use when in reality the PSNI are there in case such a high profile gay occasion is subjected to vocal opposition and abuse from people who disapprove of them. It is a ploy that already seems to be working!

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  21. This blog does not attack gay priests.

    It highlights "strange going on" by all kinds of priests and seminarians.

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    1. Today we had a good news story about a priest who helped other priests.

      Another human being helping fellow human beings.

      Was he perfect? No.

      Without Sin? No.

      Did he do a lot of good? Yes.

      Is this something to rejoice? For sure.


      There is more rejoicing in Heaven at one sinner being saved....

      It was all going well until this afternoon and it was like some people couldn't cope with the positive vibes and we had to start throwing stones again.

      We should have pride in ourselves for who we are rather than shaming people. Name and Shame! I hope we have moved away from that mentality and respect each other for being the children of God for that is what we are.

      I sometimes wonder about the people who throw stones on this blog. What would happen if they or a family member/friend got into difficulty or made a mistake?
      Would you hold with them compassion and forgiveness or kick even further when they are down?

      Clogher PP

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    2. Yes Pat, as always you dance on the head of a needle. You blame everyone else -" I'm not attacking gay priests" but your blog allows the most despicable language to ridicule, denigrate and belittle Catholic Priesthood. Sharing the truth about your lifestyle so openly does not mandate you to confer legitimacy on some racist, hatefilled people on your blog. You should be much more discerning. For many gay people still, it is very difficult for them to reconcile with their reality and truth. They need time, compassion and understanding. You have allowed much distortion of information to be placed here as definitive facts. You hurt many priests still as you did when you belonged to the Catholic Church. I think you should seriously look into your own heart. Vengance is never a foundation for justice or fairness.

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  22. Fr X
    U are not serving within the church
    You are serving yourself, and sponging of the laity to support your orange mate.
    Bet the nationalists would be sick to their stomachs if they knew their money was supporting the orange order
    Pat, time for u to name and shame...no different to Mc camley
    Btw...where is is he now...still in his lovely Keady nest?

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    1. Anonymous at 17.46
      Which is your greater prejudice - Protestants or gays?

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  23. Diarmuid Martin coined the phrase "strange goings-on".

    I bet he's regretting it now!

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  24. 16.14 and 17.46, indeed anyone, please feel free to join us on Saturday in Belfast for the pride parade. I will personally be providing sausage rolls, croissants and buns from Ashers Bakery to those who join us. Fr X

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  25. Anon at 15.41. I stand by my observation and personal experience which goes back almost 40 years. The vast majority of clergy and religious are essentially good, human, caring and kind individuals. I know that. It's a fact before your eyes. Yes, there are some whose behaviour is totally morally unacceptable. Move out of your narrow little biased mind and take notice. I somehow suspect you are not engaged in any way with your local Church or Parish to witness their good work. If you depend on this blog for your TRUTH, you'll be waiting a long, long time. Incidentally, your grammar is awful. And if you can only resort to crass, ignorant name calling, you are shallow and pathetic.

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  26. Anonymous at 18.45. A very astute observation. This blog could be very helpful in many wsys for lots of people, including priests and religious, where mature reflections and articulate, reflective debate occurs. But sadly, once an innuendo is made about a priest or information shared, some bloggers go into an apoplectic rant against the Church and priests. Often their language is biased and dangerous. This blog would give few people confidence or trust to seek support or advice. Too many people use this forum to pour out vitriol and hatred towards priests. While we must condemn all abusive and morally wrong actions, this blog gives some individuals delight at the failings of some genuinely good priests who are struggling. What Pat is your response?

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    1. All the pro-pervert clergy and their enablers/excuses/supporters are out in force since McCamley was caught masturbating online. The same thing happened after Coyle.

      There is no "hatred" towards priests here. There is disgust and righteous outrage against those who are making a mockery of the priesthood - false priests who should never have been ordained - and who should now be dismissed from the priesthood.

      Get them out! All of them! 19:46, if you interpret that as "vitriol", so be it. You are an excuser of perversion and evil that has no place among priests.

      Those under scrutiny and criticism here are NOT good priests. They are hirelings and wolves who have inveigled their way into the ranks. They must be removed.

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    2. 22.43
      Sounds as if you have made bad choices in your life. There is help. Don't give up.

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    3. Anonymous 22.43: you deliberately miss the arguments being made. I am no pro abuser or apologist for any deviancy, whoever that person may be. Definitely not but I don't aporove of your assessment. If you pay careful attention to this blog you'll notice frequent incitement to hatred of priests in general, not just morally deviant men, behaviour which I condemn. True and indisputable. Many comnents here have been poisonous and venomous towards the Catholic Church and Priesthood. Seems you are incapable of any reasonable intelligent debate. As you say - get them out---- Pat should get YOU out of this blog!! You bring no enlightenment of any kind.

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    4. 23:06 - your pathetic little games are wasted on me.

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    5. 23.53. I too think you need a wider brain and a more human perspective on life. Seems you are incapable of such. There is help available......

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  27. http://www.irishnews.com/news/2013/11/19/news/violent-burglaries-prompt-security-warning-to-priests-76209/

    Wonder if someone let them in????

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  28. Pat @17:35 'highlights'?

    Like Fr Lynch in today's story, you have suffered too Pat, you know what it is like when people say harsh things against you. I'd say you also know what it is to receive the compassion and support of people.

    I am a priest and people have come to me with various personal and sensitive issues such as affairs or addictions, of difficulties etc, and I tried to respond as best I can and hopefully bring some peace into their lives.

    I always do so in a compassionate and caring way.

    I do not go and shout their problems out from the pulpit

    I do not go and publish their problems in the press

    I do not go onto the radio, TV or internet

    I do not spread their problems around the parish

    The days of name and shame are gone

    Why would you want to injure somebody who is in a vulnerable position even more?


    From shame to grace...... we in need of God's mercy and forgiveness

    Priest who supports Pope Francis.

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  29. It's a rum business, but somebody has to do.

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  30. Don't care who you support Fr, Francis or whoever.
    Mc camley is a hypocrite, going on the World Wide Web to masturbate.
    Is this how a servant of god and the people behaves ?

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  31. PP Clogher and PP Dromore, you both illustrate well the reason for the old adage "the road to hell is paved with the heads of priests".

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