Monday, 11 September 2017

FATHER MC CAMLEY SENT AWAY
FATHER EAMON MC CAMLEY  who featured on this blog a week or two ago for masturbating on line on a site called CAFFMOS has been removed by Amy as PP of Keady and sent to an unknown location.


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One Armagh priest has informed me that Fr McCamley has been sent to the same clinic in the USA that Rory Coyle was sent to?




If you look at the Armagh website you will see Fr McCamley's new address:



KEADY PARISH PERSONNEL:



Amy's problem is that there are least SIX more Armagh priests in the same position as Fathers Coyle and McCamley"!



HOW LOW CAN THE BCATHOLIC CHURCH STOOP?



Image result for Catholic crimes against humanity

With a long history of crimes against humanity, Garry Otton wonders if there is any limit to how much Catholic adherents will put up with. 

As much as Scotland’s fourth estate might try to paper over the cracks with whatever the Scottish Catholic Media Office might throw at it, there are no escaping calls from the Scottish Secular Society for Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI and the Vatican State to face charges for Crimes Against Humanity in the International Criminal Court in the Hague.

Prior to Herr Ratzinger’s (Pope Benedict XVI) ‘state’ visit to Scotland – at considerable cost to taxpayers, involving the raiding of funds set aside for overseas aid and coinciding with news of 13 suicides of former victims of priestly abuse in Belgium – former Cardinal Keith O’Brien was pictured in the press laughing, smiling and saying that he would be “happy” if the Pope didn’t apologise for the child abuse. Apparently, there wasn’t very much in Scotland anyway. Oh, really? That was before victims of Fort Augustus Abbey School announced they were launching a lawsuit for compensation for the abuse they suffered at the hands of monks.
Homosexuals; the sixties; ephebophiles, a greater prevalence of incidences in other institutions and secularism have all been trotted out as excuses and deflections for the rot within the Church. Catholic apologists continue to do what they can to lay the blame at someone else’s door. Can they afford to do so any longer following a damning report from the United Nation’s?
Scotland should not forget the allegations against the Poor Sisters of Nazareth filed in the High Court in Aberdeen against Sister Alphonso, alias Marie Docherty. Former children from the orphanage lined up to provide testimonies of daily beatings, sexual abuse from visiting priests, the force-feeding of a little girl with her own vomit, the wrapping of bed-wetters in their urine-soaked sheets, the forcing of a wee girl into a cold bath in the middle of an epileptic fit which Sister Alphonso was supposed to have described as “the work of the devil”, lads being dropped into scalding baths and the ‘cleansing’ of menstruating girls by immersing them in baths filled with Jeyes disinfectant. One woman claimed Sister Alphonso had dragged her by her hair and beat it against a wall so hard it broke her front teeth leaving only the stumps. Helen Cuister told a court that when she began menstruating, Sister Alphonso told her that it was ‘God’s punishment’ for girls who did not behave and that her punishment would go on until midnight when she would die for being so dirty. Louise Clark told the same court how she had been beaten mercilessly simply for not attending church. In defence, Sister Alphonso told the court how, as a child she had pulled down her knickers and asked her father to hit her and, when as a sister in the Aberdeen home, she had given the girls a good talking to after she caught them watching forbidden TV programme, ‘Top of the Pops’. The church stood by Sister Alphonso. A Scottish Catholic Church source told the press: “The view within the church is that she deserves sympathy, not more punishment. The church will rally round her.” And it did. The Catholic Church appointed a team of leading lawyers, including former Solicitor General Paul Cullen, QC and the Rt Rev Mario Conti, the Catholic Bishop of Aberdeen and Orkney, later the Archbishop of Glasgow, who stepped in as chief apologist, explaining: “Some practices which, today seem excessive and even cruel, would not have been viewed in this light years ago. These convictions do not, moreover, invalidate the great good, which was done by the Sisters of Nazareth, including Sister Marie, in caring competently and appropriately for many thousands of children over the last 100 years”. Still dressed in her nun’s habit, Marie Docherty was found guilty of just four counts of cruelty and unnatural practices. Former care assistant Helen Howie, 75 was angry that she was not called as a witness. “She has made all these children out to be liars”, she was reported saying, “but everything they said was true. A couple of times when my husband came to collect me from his work he had to pull her off to stop her beating the children. I called him many a time to take her away from the children”. Docherty’s age, state of health, lack of previous convictions and the time that had passed since the crimes took place were all taken into consideration. After whispering a polite ‘thank you’ to Sheriff Colin Harris, Marie Theresa Docherty was free to walk away.

But there was also the allegations a decade ago by 11 former pupils in the Court of Session in Edinburgh who claimed to have been brutalised by an order of Catholic monks. Their solicitor, Cameron Fyfe claimed he was handling the biggest abuse case Scotland had ever seen. Allegations from former pupils of St Ninian’s List D School in Gartmore, Stirlingshire described electric shocks administered from a device described as a type of generator kept in a boot room where boys had to hold on to a pair of wires leading from the machine. Central Scotland Police were involved in compiling a report for the Procurator Fiscal that also included complaints of regular thrashings, being forced to eat vomit, sexual fondling and serious physical abuse.
The Big Issue in Scotland at the time reported a particularly harrowing tale by resident John McCorry of the behaviour of the nuns from the Smyllum Park Orphanage near Lanark. “They warped our sexualities. We were told that the toilet – and even using the word toilet – was evil. We couldn’t refer to any part of our body between the neck and knees as anything other than ‘our front’. But as a result kids would get beaten for talking about their fronts. We would get beaten for asking to go to the toilet. It was institutionalised insanity… Boys who wet the bed were beaten all the time… They were forced to drink Epsom salts over and over again. But that ended up making them doubly incontinent. Most of the boys who suffered this ended up soiling themselves a few hours later. The most disgraceful thing I ever saw was one boy who was forced to walk up and down all day in the dining hall with his wet sheet under his arm. The sister who made him do this was shouting at us, saying, ‘Why aren’t you laughing at him?’ There was the sound of forced laughter everywhere. The boy was crying. It was sadistic, sick, mental torture”. The Catholic Church’s spokesman had his secretary explain to The Big Issue: “It’s nothing to do with us any longer”.
But this is just Scotland. Some of the crimes around the world committed in this religion’s name have been horrific. A few years ago in Brazil the Catholic Church was in a pitched battle with the State after a 9-year old girl was admitted to a hospital complaining of stomach pains. Doctors quickly determined that the child, a victim of rape, was pregnant with twins and that her undeveloped uterus did not have the ability to contain one foetus, let alone two. They prescribed an abortion in order to save the little girl’s life. That’s when the Catholic Church stepped in to try and stop it. Jose Cardoso Sobrinho, Archbishop of Olinda and Recife, told journalists that God’s Law was above all human law and that anyone involved in or aiding the abortion would be subject to excommunication from the Church. And so they did.
I want to remind myself of the Catholic Church’s own rule about the Pope’s – the ‘successors of Peter’ – all being culpable. That must include the ones guilty of nepotism, murder, sexual debauchery and general depravity, none of whom the Church has officially condemned. There are the ones who took lovers, mistresses, girls or boys, married, had illegitimate children; housing and promoting their ‘nephews’. Many Pope’s had children. And Pope Julius III hardly made much of a secret about the teenage boy he picked up in the street. First he was his ‘monkey keeper’ and then he was made a Cardinal.
Then there is this Church’s historical hatred of Jews; passing laws that closed professions to them, locking them up in ghettos and forcing them to wear yellow identification. Read about the inquisitions, enforced conversions, slave trading and operations of torture and you are left either needing counselling or wondering what kind of twisted mind would ever want to associate itself with such a poisonous institution. The most obvious explanation has been ‘cognitive dissonance’.
And then there has been the gun-running, the financial wheeling and dealing, the laundering of illegal funds and the Magdalene laundries where women were incarcerated and kept as slaves. Then there has been the denial of rights to women and LGBT people, the latter including boys who were physically castrated in Dutch Catholic institutions in the sixties. Then there were the concordats with South American dictators; the deals with the Mafia (Pope Paul VI’s financial advisor, Sicilian tax lawyer, Michele Sindona recycled proceeds from Mafia heroin sales through the Vatican bank and helped the Vatican evade tax by transferring the bulk of its financial and investment assets overseas). And let’s never forget the Catholic Church’s administration of Nazi rat-runs. Oh, yes… You didn’t even need to be a Catholic to get Vatican help here: Just a Nazi. After the war, funded by Nazi gold, twenty Catholic agencies helped spirit away the likes of the commander of Treblinka, Franz Strangl who murdered 900,000 people; deputy commander of Sobibor, Gustav Wagner who murdered 250,000 Jews and Adolf Eichmann. One of the beneficiaries was most probably Dr Carl Vaernet who performed the most horrible experiments on Jewish homosexuals in the Buchanwald concentration camp in an attempt to cure homosexuals. All this before you get to the endless cases of sexual, physical and mental torture it put children through before the Vatican tried to cover it up, often blackmailing its victims into silence or moving priests to different areas where they could go on abusing more children.

The Catholic Church appears to be an institution that can get away with murder. Literally.

77 comments:

  1. http://www.echo.ie/tallaght/article/st-mark-s-looks-forward-to-new-deacon-in-parish

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  2. Now that we have had that very detailed long list of the negative things about the Church, could you please restore balance and cheer us all up by putting the same amount of effort and research into recounting all the positive wonderful good people past and present in the Church - people whose good works lit up and changed the lives of everyone they came across! That will be quite a challenge for you and test your honesty! And please do not cop out and say you cannot think of anything. What an insult and injustice that would be to the areas and members of the Church that I am thinking of. Can you even begin to prove to your readers here that you have fair and balanced judgement? I frankly can't see it happening. More likely outcome is that we get same old.. same old... and ditto in the responses, needless to say! I have never missed an opportunity to condemn wrongs, particularly child abuse and other wrongs for months now. So please spare me the tired old chestnuts - - that I must want to "excuse" abusers and that I must be "covering up for.." WRONG! So get thinking and researching and let's see a different kind of blog for once. I won't be holding my breath though..

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    1. It would be absolute nonsense and patently untrue if I said that there were not good people in the RC Church and that good was not done.

      I acknowledge all this good.

      I invite you - and any reader to submit items highlighting this good.

      I will search for such material myself and publish.

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    2. Thanks Pat! Re/your acknowl'g good in the Church. I am pleased at your response to me @ 1.38. You surprised me... don't forget now..... Research the life of St Martin

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  3. For many people, for many years, the Church was the biggest bully in the playground. They ruled with a rod of iron. No one was allowed to say anything because they had absolute power. It is only natural that people are speaking out now that that power is eroding. It is good for the soul. The Church always thought it was not held by the norms of civil behaviour. There has been no freedom of speech in the church for many years. Theologians silenced, nuns bullied, children abused an no one was allowed to defend themselves. There have always been good people in the Church, but they were trapped in a rotten system....and, I am afraid to say, a lot looked away. The truth will out.

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    1. I agree Jane. "Many looked away.

      "For evil to succeed all that is necessary is that good people do nothing.

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    2. One of the most challenging things for a teacher at times.. not easy but it has to be acknowledged if the good that has been achieved is not to unravel... is to continue to protect and look after the child who was freed and rescued from a long established situation where he was plagued by the playground bully. He revels in his new strength and blossoms in his new power and in his lack of fear. That is very gratifying but that young person has still a host of negative memories in his head and may carry his anger for life. So he actually becomes vulnerable in a new way and that is he can revert to behaviour that he "learned" and experienced before in the playground. But this time he is in a position of strength and may not have anything like the maturity to use it wisely and have compassion for the younger and weaker kids. So he over reacts and needs monitoring and guidance lest he, himself becomes the next yard bully. People have anger and human feelings and I'm afraid that is what we sometimes see. It can continue into adulthood if not handled carefully. Two wrongs don't make a right. Other young people do go forward with balanced compassion and that's what we are trying to achieve for everyone. It's not easy at times.

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  4. All state institutions get away with murder but some are more newsworthy than others. The article above is just a long list of diatribe against Catholicism worthy of a 1641 English pamphlet on the Irish or an attempt to present (Scottish) sectarianism within a more acceptable and contemporary wrapper. What relevance has Pope Julius III(1487-1555) to modern Catholicism or a debate about the modern world? Following the logic of the writer, the long list of sins and crimes committed by the Church damn it and demand its dissolution. Should every state in the world disband itself because all institutions have been built on similar foundations. It's just nonsense and bullshit. I generally agree with you Pat but this article is just garbage. I know the Church is corrupt and has committed many crimes in the past and today but the presentation of the charges above remind me more of a hotter sermon in some gospel hall in the Braid valley in the 1980s rather than an effective critique of the corruption within the church. The mortar for the building of any New Jerusalem involves a lot of blood. This has been true for any attempt to build the Kingdom of God on earth, whether that be of a religious or a secular kind.

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    1. 09:06, 'the mortar for the building of any New Jerusalem involves a lot of blood'? Sure. And, of course, 'you can't make an omelette without breaking a few eggs', can you? Or how about this? 'They were just collateral damage'. Or this? 'We have to take the rough with the smooth.'

      Are you 'getting the picture'? You are dismissing historical clerical abuse with cliché. And yet, you have the brass neck to complain about today's blog.

      You really don't 'get it', do you? It is because of dismissive apologists like you that blogs such as this are vital, 'lest we forget'.

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    2. Lest we forget being the operative words. Jesus said that a lot. Get back under your bridge and wait for the goats.

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    3. 10:21, what a meaningless, pointless post.

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    4. Magna at 09.46, you expressed what I was totally feeling. The apologist you refer to who has been dismissive of historic clerical abuse has been busy dismissing the blog also. I'm glad this person is being challenged - he/she has been on here at least 3 times today. Thanks Mags.

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    5. I once met a lady at a conference who told me that she was a descendant of the said Julius III. She told me that one custom of her family was to have a valise packed ready to go in case any situation arose demanding them to get out of Dodge. They trace that back to the aftermath of Julius's death when the Romans got rather nasty with anyone connected to the same.

      Seraphim

      Oh, she always had her valise with her during the conference.

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    6. It's like our parish priest - - everything packed and ready.. He says he never goes anywhere without a bandy little hag..

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    7. (@22.31 Ha ha! - - Thanks for the humour - - loved it, bless you!

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  5. A bit late in the day for this wank bandit.

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    1. It is never too late for anyone to change and make a new beginning.

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    2. Hear, hear! @Pat

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    3. Give over, if you're not celibate by 64 you never will be!

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  6. 9.06
    And why shouldn't julius be mentioned
    After all we read about Peter
    Are we supposed to forget the inbetweeners ?
    Just asking

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    1. The institutional Roman Catholic Church has only ever been interested, at best, in presenting half-truths, especially of itself.

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  7. Thank you pat for your blog today.
    Thought all our popes were holy god fearing people.... that is until readingyour blogtoday.
    Is this why we never encouraged to read the criminal stuff in out church history,
    Was it skirted over or kept hidden ?

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    1. Check out the Borgia Pope

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    2. 13:44, yes, Alexander VI, one of 'the lads'.

      On EWTN once, Fr Mitch Pacwa, in desperate defence of the Catholic Church's tendency at times to elect morally questionable characters to the papacy (and, therefore, to call into question the assumption that the Holy Spirit is in some way involved in these choices) said (more or less): Ah! But if you look closely, you'll see that God never taught any great dogmas through these popes.

      Still trying to work out the relevance of his response to the convenient idea that the Holy Spirit may not roll the dice in papal elections, but he does determine which way up it stops.

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  8. 9.22
    Can u please modify your language, thank you

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  9. 9. O6
    Why denigrate gospel halls in the Braid valley.
    Very inappropriate...it is a lovelypart of Ireland.

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    1. Why denigrate? Sectarian bigotry.

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    2. Magna, you've crept out from under the rock again, like a snake, hissing venomously in the hope of making serious noise...your words are just that. All huff and puff...Like Pat, you revel in the negative and deliberately fail to see all the wonderful good within the Church. I acknowledger the awful wrongs and abuses within the Church but I also see and witness many,many people living the gospel of Christ, people who get up and do something worthwhile and contribute meaningfully and positively to their church, parish and community. Let's celebrate this good news. It's easy to sit on the sidelines spouting judgments and condemnation....but if that's your vocation Magsy, stay under the rock.

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    3. 'Magsy'? Hmm Rather like that. Sounds chummy.

      My comment was on the sectarian bigotry of 09:06, not on the Church. You're not going to defend sectarian bigotry, are you?

      Yes, by all means let's celebrate what's good in the Church. But first let's remember what was for so long forgotten in the Church and by the Church: the bad.

      Don't be so fast to run away from these 'inconvenient' truths.

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    4. The media headlines in the past few days have hardly shown people living the Gospel, especially the Nuns in the Orphanage in Lanarkshire. You have over the last few days decried those highlighting the negatives of the Church. You are the same person because your posts are repetitive and the same old tired mantra. You were also crowing at 01.38, I suppose it's too negative for you that we think of the plight of those 400 children in that Orphanage and other religious institutions who were mistreated. I'm sorry if you don't like us to talk about such issues.

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    5. @13.31
      Please be aware that you are but a (very) small part of the totality of this blog and it is entirely up to Pat's other posters what opinions they wish to express. It is certainly not your place to dictate to others what their opinions should be. You say what you like. Others are perfectly able to do the same.

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    6. Thank you @14.47
      We couldn't agree more.
      Plenty of would-be Hitlers about. We have noticed that too.

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    7. 14.47 You don't seem to like what you've heard, good and tough, get over yourself clerical abuse denier.

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    8. 15.37 We Couldn't agree more with you.

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    9. Oh very original...

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  10. Catholics can be sectarian bigots Magna!
    Now we have seen it typed

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    1. You sound, er, surprised, 11:55.

      Catholicism since the Eastern schism (and particularly since the Protestant Reformation) has been deeply sectarian.

      Wait! Don't tell me you're one of those anally retentive Catholics deluded with the nonsense that the Roman Catholic Church has nothing to answer for morally? You are, aren't you?

      (Psst! I have the perfect purge for your anal retention: historical truth. But I warn you a common and aggressive side-effect among Catholics is that it can engender strident denial.)

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    2. 'Catholicism since the Eastern schism (and particularly since the Protestant Reformation) has been deeply sectarian'. Surely the same confessionalising trends were evident in Orthodoxy and Protestantisms too? It's extremely naïve and simplistic in thinking and knowledge to imagine that one side was better, in this case, than the other.

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    3. I never said or implied that 'one side was better...than the other'. But Roman Catholicism, probably from the shock of Protestant Reformation and certainly from the self-belief of sole doctrinal authority, has expressed particular theological sectarianism.

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    4. What utter nonsense. Protestantism needed to define itself just as much if not more so than Catholicism did as Rome had laid claim to a legacy and succession going back supposedly to Peter. Read any sixteenth or seventeenth century Protestant or even English or north German text and the vitriol is dripping off the page though I'm sure they gave as good as they got. If you call the Bishop of Rome the Whore of Babylon, Beast or Anti-Christ and define the split in the church as necessary as it had been in the hands of the devil until then, well sectarianism does tend to emerge as a rather crucial component of confessional identities.

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    5. 16:49, nonsense? Do you not know that the Council of Trent (15:45-1563) was convened with one purpose: to condemn the Protestant Reformation and its teachings? Don't you know the anathemas (effectively, damnations, based on the Church's dogmatic claim to be the sole divine authority and the sole conduit of grace through her sacraments: Extra ecclesiam nulla salus) issued against Protestants by this council? These anathemas have never formally been revoked?

      No, you don't, do you? Since you wouldn't have posted such an ignorant comment.

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    6. Really silly reply from MC

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    7. Glad you've realised it at last, 23:32

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  11. So church history is diatribe ?
    Is this what is thought of your blog today, Pat.?
    Did you not know to never tak about renegade church leaders.
    And keep their sex lives out of the limelight ,
    When writing another critique remember the great professor at 9 .06

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  12. Has any human institution maintained a form of purity for more than a nanosecond? Is it not natural that much of the leadership and other institutions within the Church are corrupt as with any other human institution? For the trolls out there, can any of you actually point out a time in Christianity when everybody was in step with Christ and his teachings? At one level, the Church (with its huge amount of faults, sins, crimes, etc) is being judged to impossible standards. It's rotten but then it's ultimately a church of sinners rather than saints. Some of the posters here are only capable of criticising and utterly unable at suggesting realistic alternatives for Catholics today. I'm sure they will point to an idyllic past at the time of Christ which has no basis in reality, even if one were to take the scriptures seriously. From some posters here,(and I don't mean Pat himself) I see only hate and self righteousness and arrogance which they would condemn others of. If I were or am to believe in a Christ, I would be just as leery as following their prescriptions and their idea of a God just as I would be of the same priests they revile.

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    1. Oh it's great to be so perfect 13.11.

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    2. Yes, we are a church of sinners, as is every other church and organisation on the planet. Yes, yes, we know all of this, this tiresome cliché. But WE are much more than a church of sinners: we are a church of inveterate, pathological liars who 'tidied away' the moral filth it did not want the world to behold in order to sustain the monstrous lie that Roman Catholic clergy were beyond moral reproach (and, therefore, beyond criticism and questioning). THIS is why there is such focus on the Church now: it has proved that it cannot be trusted to hold itself to public account and to tell the truth, as much about Jesus as about itself.

      Is this penny finally, at very long last, dropping for you, and your kind? Well?

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    3. 13.11 I used to work in an office that dealt with a lot of card payment. One day security came in and removed an entire section of eight people. They had been taking the card details and forwarding them to people who lived abroad. The main concern of the company was to protect our clients. The people were sacked. The firm had realised that this could happen and dealt with it very swiftly. They had a duty of care to the people who trusted them. Why did the Church not feel it had a duty of care to us. Doctors, lawyers etc are all held to account. Why is the priesthood so special that is above civil law. Any institution which has no intention of following civil law is.....criminal. During the the inquiry into the child abuse scandal, a lawyer asked Cardinal Pell if he realised that up until recently sexual abuse of children had been a capital offense. Cardinal Pell said he did realise that. In every organisation there are rogues but they must be dealt with. Freedom for the wolves is death for the lambs.

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  13. 12.25
    The gaa contribute more, not the church going people.
    When you stop denigrating other posters your post might taken some authenticity.


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  14. 13 11
    Another poster calling other posters and trolling
    Kettle, pot , black.

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  15. I've no wish to suggest an alternative13 11
    I haven't posted any '''revile"" or mentioned priests, neither have I read any here today from posters.
    To lead a true Christian life.
    Just do whatever job or profession to the best of your ability
    Forget religion
    Eat healthy food,exercise regularly so that u not a liability to the system.

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  16. Pat can you not publish comments about posters.
    No one now addressing the content.
    Your followers are now trolling...Mostly

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    1. Another person dictating what should and shouldn't be published. Not your decision!!

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  17. Magna, I was making a joke at 11.55.
    Strange how a post is misinterpreted.
    Lol...I was agreeing with you
    Please don't mention the anus again..I'm not constipated thank god.. lol and lol

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    1. Oh, sorry!

      The drawback of text alone and no body language (and my poor sense of irony😊)

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  18. I remember the notorious Sister Alphonse case. A couple weeks after being admonished she was sent on holiday to Florida. I imagine the scandalous Fr McCamley will also be enjoying his holiday.

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    1. They will probably have sex.

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  19. His whole life in Keady was a holiday
    With loads of cash at his disposal
    Gullible parishioners

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    1. ... now they are paying for the bum bandit's "sex therapy".

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  20. Who is the new Administrator of the Pro in Dublin.?.

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    1. An obnoxious Bollox Kieran McDermott who fancies himself inn a mitre.....

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    2. So does an administrator get to were a mitre
      Btw what is a mitre....a jockstrap

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    3. Fr. Kieran is a wonderful priest.

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  21. I think Pat is out on another dinning experience in some grand Hotel today.
    Just joking Pat, hope you are good.
    I never need to read a book anymore
    All the Irish history and daily news is on here.
    Wink wink

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  22. I heard Magna Carta is new Adm.of Pro.....Imagine the fun....Would be a welcome change!!!

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    1. Well you wouldn't need a missal, you would *never* know what you'd get next.

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  23. So Fr McCamley has allegedly been sent to some fix the priest shop. Why do some Bishops think priests are broken and can be restored to some stereotype that never existed in the first place. I am not condoning inappropriate action but for the sake of argument I ask if all people who support these off centre sites are broken or something else? I'm not sure what the right word to use is. The ironic thing is that these sites must in some way be legal. Perhaps what I'm asking is what is the position with regard the non religious person who uses these sites. There must be a lot of them out there to keep the sites in business.

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    1. The last one grew a ginger beard and came back for a visit.
      And this ones deed is being denied by his loyal parishioners they say
      '' ache sure he was drunk one nite and using his phone just like the young fellas do ''

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    2. They haven't taken a vow of non masturbation.
      They just tell it in confession....as if

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    3. One also has to question the type of men running these places. The former head of one such place in the US had to resign not so long ago due to irregular behaviour on his part. Reminded me of 'One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest'.

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  24. Interesting point about how Scotland took money meant for overseas aid to finance Benedict's visit. Do we really think Francis would be any better? In effect he is worse than Benedict in how he is very protective towards those guilty of clerical abuse.

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  25. Who was Sr Alphonse? Can someone enlighten me?

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  26. Sure Sean we had a leaders wife a mrs Robinson saying that she knew a psychiatrist who cd cure gayness...an abomination in her eyes....
    Even though she was shagging a teenager at the time
    U could not make it up

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  27. Well it wasn't Benidicts fault about how the money was obtained

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  28. Pat, it amazes me that when someone expresses a positive view about priests or the church and commends the good that's done, thay are accused of being "clerical abuse apologists". I just think it's an unfair response. I know many priests who have publicly condemned abusers and the Church's cover up. As an observer, while I condemn all abuse and find it morally reprehensible, I feel we must support the good priests and religious and work collaboratively together in more meaningful ways. Criticism and judgment are imperative, but we must also encourage the good we see.

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  29. @22.55
    I agree with you. Day and daily I try and try to get more positive viewpoints but I get nowhere since people are so entrenched in their desperation to only see the Church's shortcomings. I am regularly verbally abused by posters who never want to hear anything positive about the Church. For example, see at the very top, my post at 1.38. Pat promised me he would research some of the good in order to be more balanced viewpoints. I hope he keeps his word.

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