Monday, 9 October 2017

BISHOPS HURTING PRIESTS



On the Blog, over the last few days, we have heard a fair little bit about how bishops can hurt their priests and seminarians and sometimes even destroy their lives.

We heard from the relative of a priest who claimed that Cahal Daly destroyed their brother's life.

We heard about priests being greatly hurt by the behaviours and actions of the Archbishop Emeritus of Cashel and Emly.

We have heard of the Dublin priests who feel hurt, neglect and being taken for granted by Diarmuid Martin in Dublin.

This week I personally heard of how a priest felt hurt bu the coldness and aloofness of Noel Treanor in Down and Connor.


The sad reality in the Catholic Church is that bishops can treat their priests very unfairly and like dirt and the priests have no come back.

Traditionally I have heard priests say that in Canon Law the only right a curate has is to a Christian burial!

SEMINARIANS:

We have also seen on this Blog over time about vulnerable seminarians are to the whim of their bishops and indeed to the whim of Maynnoth priest staff members.

We heard of the great injustice Conan in Derry suffered at the hands of Maynooth and Donal McKeown when he reacted in shock to find two fellow seminarians in bed together.

The response of the Church and the bishops seem to be: FIRE THE WHISTLEBLOWER. 

This type of behaviour is no longer accepted in industry, the services industry, and the civil service. These places now have a Charter for Whistleblowers to give them protection.

If these "secular" entities protect whistleblowers and have a grievance procedure for their staff - how much more should the Church have it - the Church being ideally that body which advocates the Trust and Justice of Christ and God?


Bullying is and has always been, rife in the Church and the bullies - bishops and superiors get away with it under the illegitimate cover of the vow/promise of obedience - blind obedience!

WHAT CAN BE DONE ABOUT IT?

If the Church was willing - and of course it is not - there should be a whole new section in canon law - a grievance procedure - whereby a priest or a seminarian should be able to challenge the behaviour and decisions of bishops and superiors.

This procedure would need to be totally independent of Church authority - maybe run and overseen by law people and civil lawyers. Their findings should be binding on bishops and superiors and a bishop should not be able to "punish" a priest or seminarian for resorting to this grievance procedure.

The occasional priest has successfully appealed a bishop's decision to Rome. But even then it is all done in secret courts and is very unsatisfactory.

Perhaps as part of this, there could be a Priests and Seminarians Representative Body who would speak for and represent a priest or seminarian. If you like a priests and seminarians trade union.

Those of us who have brought bishops to Industrial Tribunals and Civil Courts (like I did with Cahal Daly) know how impossible this way of getting justice is.

In Irish and UK law a priest is not deemed an "employee". Rather he is deemed to be a self-employed subcontractor to the Church and the bishop. That's why the Belfast Industrial Tribunal would not hear Buckley v Daly.

And when I got him to the Belfast High Court I was told that the Catholic Church in civil law had the same status as a golf club. In order to succeed against Daly, I had to PROVE that he acted otherwise than in accordance with Canon Law. As Canon Law was made by bishops, for bishops - a curate did not have a snowball's chance in Hell!

How ludicrous it is to say that a diocesan priest is a subcontractor and not an employee.

A bishop dictates to a priest where he shall live, in what house he shall live, at the bishop's whim. He dictates his income and working conditions. He dictates his time off and his holidays. He even dictates who he can associate with.

Not only is a poor priest an employee - he is a SUPER EMPLOYEE with very few rights.

A priest is a little better off than a modern day (if comfortable) slave!

In the absence of the Church and canon law doing something to correct this - who do priests form their own "trade union" - The National Union of Priests and Seminarians?




That's how other former work slaves freed themselves from their work masters.

The union could negotiate priests rights with the Bishops Conference and bishops would be bound by an employment contract. 

An unjust or tyrannical bishop could find himself the subject of "industrial action", a go slow, a work to rule or indeed an all-out strike.

I imagine that priests would get tremendous support from their parishioners in such a venture.


Imagine a picket on Diarmuid Martin's house to stop him getting to the airport for his next international flight?




Imagine a picket on Noel Treanor's palace where other union members would not pass and prevent his delivery of fine food and fine wines?




Imagine Dermot Clifford not being able to get his latest delivery of Jameson or Red Breast because of the clerical picket in Cashel?




Imagine gynecologists and midwives coming out on strike in sympathy with Waterford priest's picket on Phonsie?




Imagine Amy Martin stuck behind the picket lines in Ara Coeli for a month and not being able to get to the Bogside to collect his fairy cakes and fresh cream sponges from his mammy?




This idea has great potential you know........................................

















70 comments:

  1. Pat please make up your mind. Today you're arguing that priests are no more than modern day slaves. In other posts on this site it's been argued that priests are freeloading lazy swines who are fleecing the faithful. Can they be both?
    Simple fact is that at both ordination as a deacon and a priest you kneel before the bishop and promise respect and obedience to your ordinary. As a priest I've ended up in situations that I wouldn't have chosen but I've always ended up in the right place at the right time. But then it's not been about me! You gonna print this or ignore it like many of the previous comments I've tried to post?

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    1. Obedience and respect is a two way street.

      Any bishop who is tyrannical and unjust loses his right to obedience and respect.

      Priests and seminarians should have ways of challenging a Purple Hitler!

      Delete
  2. In the republic it has long been the case that employment tribunals are supposed to look beyond the appearance of subcontractors and actually assess who has control over the work. (This may be the case in the North now as this type of test post-dates your situation with Daly).

    That said I do not know of any situation where the courts have adjudicated on a clerical example. I think the judges would be sympathetic to a priests position in the current climate.

    Aside from that I wish to point out the Johnny Buckley could easily be named on here too. He may be famous for attending every funeral in the city (wanted or otherwise) and for his Tuesday hospital visits - but unknown to most people in the pews is his dark side.

    Should a priest (or seminarian for that matter) get into any difficulty he shall instantly become a person non-grata. Often we have seen that the priest or seminarian is not even at fault for the situation they find themselves in. Alas they have no second chance with the bishop because management of their 'situation' is delegated to The Coadjutor, aka, Stonewall Deenihan.

    I have seen too many peers out of ministry, cleared and left out of ministry. I have seen too many peers leave because they are not afforded simple human dignity. I have heard too many stories about our students being dealt injustices by Maynooth's 'experts'. It is hard to keep up ministry when those entrusted with leadership provide none.

    Cork PP

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    1. I have heard stories about my namesake and how hard he is when a priest or seminarians has a difficulty.

      He is going soon and I hope you get someone more compassionate.

      Delete
    2. I concur with all of the above about Johnny Buckley and Tom Deenihan. They are a damaging pair.

      CR.

      Delete
  3. Even priests who opt to leave the priesthood and follow the correct procedures to be laicised, have a certain amount of control exerted over them. They are encouraged not to frequent places where they might be recognised. Most men do not take this step lightly, having agonised over it perhaps for months or years and often for very valid reasons. Thankfully, the laity are quite understanding and it would take more to scandalise them than seeing a former priest walking down the street.

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    1. If either as a seminarian or a fully ordained priest you are absolutely sure after months of careful reflection (and perhaps good advice if appropriate) that you are not heading for or in the correct profession for you. then take steps to leave. Do not do it lightly as you may be in a tired depressed but passing phase which will pass. Do not do it lightly as you may be going through a temporary difficult patch wherein your intentions and depth of vocation is being tested.
      But if you know you are in the wrong profession, go.
      If you stay you will continue be be unhappy and restless and you will eventually cease to serve God's people well..
      Pray constantly for peace of mind and clarity of vision on the way ahead.
      It takes courage to join.
      It can take equal courage to reverse your decision.

      Delete
    2. All very good advice.

      And whether staying or leaving it is important to have someone to talk it through with.

      And if you cannot make up your mind ask for a break.

      Delete
    3. 13.22 Laicisation! Ive been there and worn the t shirt. I had to go through an interview. That was ok. The document that followed was inhuman and anything but christian. I was told I could not teach or preach outside the RC Church as well as inside it. Inside the R C Church I could accept that is their prerogative. Outside the R C Church is another matter. My polite response was "Harvey Smith" Laicised Priests have much to offer and their worth to the community should not be watered down.They have much to offer

      Delete
  4. Yes absolutely...

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  5. Many years ago, someone I know, now deceased, worked for Buckley in Cork (not as a priest). The poor man had mental health problems and Buckley very callously fired him, leaving him without means or a roof over his head. He ended up in a psychiatric hospital.He was the salt of the earth and a very kindhearted, sensitive person. He'll certainly outshine all of these so called prelates in heavenly glory, that's for sure.

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    1. John Buckley did nothing but cover up when I was abused by a now ex-priest in Maynooth. Through Tom Deenihan, he even refused medical treatment as part of the recovery despite their affirmation of what happened.

      Several years later John Buckley was asked to stay away from my family when my brother was in intensive care following a road accident. His response came four days later; he showed up at my brother's removal and after the fourth decade of the rosary he walked up to the microphone, stood down the local curate Fr Ben and took over the prayers. Later that week he randomly choose to spend Easter in the local parish.

      He has since refused to apologise saying he did nothing wrong.

      John Buckley is a most insensitive man, lacking in self-awareness and self-reflection. I find him to be a man who has spent his life hidden within his cassock. I hope the new nuncio replaces him soon.

      Delete
    2. Two deformators were in charge during my time in Maynooth. Both seemed entirely unhappy. One was only interested in football. The other one erections. What idiots are the bishops who had such clowns forming men for priesthood?

      Delete
    3. @22.46
      Sounds like Donal O'Neill and Paul Prior... aka, the Muppet show.

      Delete
  6. Bishop Toal in Scotland has bullying tendencies. He has a great knack of staring you out if you present him with a personal problem or difficulty. He doesn't treat people very well. Why is it that Bishops like him manage to climb further up the ecclesiastical ladder, greasy pole more like.

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  7. Did not Cahal Daly also evict a family from their home as someone left the property to him in a Will. He wanted them out of their family home sharpish and finally got them evicted.

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    Replies
    1. He did. I got the family a new home in Downpayrick.

      Delete
    2. He did. I got the family a new home in Downpayrick.

      Delete
  8. I think its a given fact that Bishops have hurt Priests in the past and that the present is a time of scrutiny and call to accountability. It is also true in the past that Parish Priests have hurt curates and curates may have gone on to hurt others. Bottom line priesthood was a strained and frustrating lifestyle for many and the frustration was often manifested in unhealthy ways. Priests were often trapped knowing no other way to survive outside the presbytery. That was then and this is now. Priests are human beings and Bishops are no Lords. Renewal from the top down and bottom up is required

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  9. I am a lay person - - - I am aware that being elevated to the role of bishop is sometimes described as being in the "fulness of the priesthood" and therefore a further development of the person's initial vocation.
    But that said, it is very clear that it is also undoubtedly a MANAGEMENT role with all the additional skills of fairness, diplomacy, efficiency and transparency that some of us in lay management positions would be rigorously tested for, both initially to get our management post and on an ongoing basis in some instances. I wonder how some of our past and present bishops would fare in certain professions outside the protected world of the episcopate?

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    1. An excellent comment at 16:51. A bishop is effectively the CEO and HR director of a multi-million £ operation, with many employees (both lay and clerical). There are no job descriptions, interviews or selection panels. By some mysterious process, a candidate who doesn't even have to apply for the job is offered it.

      Depressingly, these are very often priests who have only served in parishes for a blink of an eye, if at all (eg Dermo, Cahal, Noel, Amy, Martin Drennan, Brendan Leahy, John McAreevy, the hearse chaser down in Cork & Ross).

      Often those selected are Private Secretaries lined up for the pointy hat by the bishop they work for.

      Delete
    2. (I am poster from 16.51

      Thank you 18.04 for your response and your further good points..

      Delete
    3. 16.51 They'd be fecked😀

      Delete
  10. My experience in both the private and public sectors, is that, generally people don't get the best jobs and promotions by being nice. A degree of pushiness and a big ego propels people forward. I dare say it's the same in the various Christian churches. I've yet to meet a shy, retiring Irish PP or bishop.

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  11. The term that a bishop has achieved " fullness of priesthood" sounds very like an invention of the episcopate to add to the status of Princes of the Church and their Lordships. I have known quite a few bishops in my time as I worked very closely with one and through him met many others. With a few exceptions the only word which I find to describe them is Wankers.

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  12. That poster at 16.51 has it right about management requirements. It is a set of acquired skills for which we do specific and often ongoing training and assessment as he/she says. Here are some of the skills which need to be studied and mastered :-

    --management of people

    --management of money and /or available resources

    --management of one's own time and (if necessary) the time and rotas of other people dependent on your judgement.

    Each of the categories above can be divided into several important sub-sections which I haven't time to outline in detail here... But the point is that good management doesn't happen by chance!

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  13. Pat, it's very often the case that it's not just Bishops who hurt Priests but fellow Priests can also equally cause much hurt and harm. Certain PP's can bully Curates and if they don't conform then they get rid of them. Some were always known as, 'Curate Breakers'. What gets me is the retired PP's who insist on continuing to live on in their former Parishes. Sometimes this means buying a property there which I think is unfair to their successor. When a Priest leaves or retires they should leave, move on and give their successor a chance. The Bishops are just as to blame for allowing this to happen.
    Sr. Mary

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    Replies
    1. Quite right, Sr Mary. Many parishioners think of the former PP as still being the real one. And in some dioceses the retired PP (pastor emeritus) carries on living in the Parochial House and the new actual PP lives elsewhere. Imagine a lay job, eg a school, in which there's a new principal. Not only is the former principal still on the staff, he or she still uses the principal's office. Talk about backseat driving.

      I imagine that a new PP would be reluctant to make changes in a parish whilst the former PP still resides there, lest it appear a criticism of his predecessor.

      That said, Benedict's presence in the Vatican is I hope a restraining hand on Francis, who would doubtless be even more heretical if Benedict was not around.

      Delete
    2. People have surely got the right to choose and buy their own home in whatever district they choose!
      Two issues are being hopelessly confused here but you know what they say about "two wrongs.."

      Delete
    3. In Clogher diocese we have many PE's who still think they are running the show. Our Vocations Director is 83.......yes, 83! He still sits on the Chapter of Canons and is involved in decision making at the highest level.
      Most of the PE's refuse to leave a parish once they reach 75 and simply make life hell for the new PP. Our two former bishops allowed and even encouraged this to continue. In fact they're both still pulling the strings at the very top level in the diocese......and are adamant that a 'local' man will be our next bishop. The whole thing stinks......no wonder guys are losing interest and just walking away.

      Delete
    4. Clogher Priest at 23.41 you are totally correct. It's the same elsewhere like here in Armagh. It's the same people running the show, dictatorial and safe Bishops men. You are right to say it stinks. Perhaps Pat you need to explore this subject more as some sad facts and cases have emerged from different parts of the country. Whoever that Sr. Mary is she should contribute more to the blog.

      Delete
    5. In Clogher diocese the 83 year old VD is Mgr Sean [money-mad] Cahill. A crony of Joe Duffy's his entire pastoral experience consisted of teaching in, then being President of St Macartan's College.

      Then he got the nod and became PP of Enniskillen, one of the plum Clogher parishes.

      Almost at once he tarted up the Parochial House and the curates' house, starting with the parochial house of course, designer wallpaper,fancy kitchen and bathrooms, no expense spared.

      Then he got a soft number in Maguiresbridge. There must be poor WiFi coverage there as he didn't get the email telling him he's no longer the VG. Wonder how he's able to book his holidays in the Canaries?

      Clogher curate.

      Delete
  14. A person should have the complete freedom to purchase his home in whatever area he chooses without pressure to leave the familiarity of a district where he/she has family and/or friends. We don't live in old Communist Russia!

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    1. I would question how certain retired priests who have remained in the same area for years can afford to buy a plush house and in some incidences have two properties. We may not live in Communist Russia but some retired PP's who have wielded power for years still believe they can dictate as if they were in Russia. Priests are called to serve not get comfortable in one particular area and live a very cushy existence with the familiarity of rich friends who fund their lifestyle. It's interesting you never see the same Priests visit the flats or housing estates. They are too busy frequenting the houses of the business owners and the toffs/big shots. Sr. Mary was absolutely right at 18.16.

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    2. If an elderly PP has given some of the best years of his life to working with the people of parish through their joys and sorrows, it is hardly surprising that he may not have the mental or physical energy to start off as an anonymous stranger in a new district far away. I, as a lay person, find it astounding that anybody would suggest that they did! Sometimes folk can be very lacking in empathy. Unbelievable!

      Delete
    3. @ 22.35

      Yes, I was thinking that too. You sound much more humane than that other madam.

      Delete
    4. 22.35 You are part of the problem with this mentality. A Priest is always on the move from place to place like the Lord himself was. It's part of their calling to move around, many have done so and continue to do so. Some priests no matter their age can get too smug, comfortable and dare I say complacent. That's the issue and problem.
      Sr. Mary

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    5. So right, Sr Mary. The Son of Man had nowhere to lay his head, and PEs need a house in their last parish? What a farce.

      Delete
  15. In the summer of 2000 the 3 curates in Tipperary town left at the same time. Since that time lots of the priests under 50 have left including the former chancellor of the diocese who was also the director of deformation in the seminary in Thurles. Common denominator: his (now former) disgrace!

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    1. I met men from Cashel and Emly training for priesthood. None studied for their home diocese because Dermot Clifford had a policy of not responding to applications from would-be-seminarians.

      Look at the stats... What priest was ordained next before Dominic Meehan?? You will look back nearly a decade and a half before you find such a man. It was not for want of applicants. Dermot Clifford has done some amount of damage.

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    2. Clifford ran Cashel into the ground. About 25 priests left the diocese over a twenty year period. All Mr. Clifford was interested in was wearing fancy dress and being addressed as "Your Grace"

      Delete
  16. The grip of the church on jobs that are in the SECULAR WORLD is also great, for all the wrong reasons.

    It is possible within the National Health Service to be a non ordained non denominational chaplin in a hospital setting. If the position has a salary it will be offered without being affilated and backed by a church faith.

    Furthermore you will not get the training required without the backing of a faith church (Roman Catholic, Methodist, Jewish etc).

    You can of course volunteer for the position and be accepted by the NHS with any issue to serve as a Chaplin to all faiths and none.

    This I am finding out the hard way after doing the job for the past 6 months. I would rather ask Kim Yun or the head of ISIS than ask the likes of the Bishops mentioned in this post.

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  17. Sometimes things happen to us, especially when we are younger and immature, and we find ourselves in the wrong place or state of mind and completely helpless to do anything about it, can’t see the wood for the trees. Knowledge and personal skills desert us and our only hope comes with the intervention of organisations/people who have recognised our plight, at least in civvy street but not from my bishop or priest colleagues. I’m now well out of ministry and relatively happy but I still feel an emptiness which is getting worse as I get older.
    The bishop refused to meet me and I met with his number two instead. My indiscretion was met with nothing short of a character assassination. I’ll never forget his anger and venom towards me and have never fully recovered from it despite my attempts to pull myself together and not let it dominate my life. His vulgarity in the way he ‘addressed’ me, his lack of compassion and insensitivity and inability to hear me out was all I thought anathema to priesthood. He obviously didn’t pray before meeting with me.
    When I see the goings on in the church today, my lapse was nothing in comparison. My emptiness comes from the fact I am a priest out of ministry for something so trivial. A senior priest whom I met recently and confided in said, in the situation, he would have offered to hear my confession, kept in touch and encouraged my priesthood.
    Why was I confronted with the devil in my hour of need, why did I not meet the Risen Christ whom I lovingly tried to bring to others so that they may be free?

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    Replies
    1. To 19.01
      Your case is not over.. so long as you stay in daily prayer.
      Pray to St Martin and say a Rosary at least twice a week to Our Lady of Cana.. I wish I could tell you... I wish I could say more... Just do it....

      Delete
    2. What if a diocese of the Old Roman Catholic Church became active in Ireland? Could those of us exReligious and exDiocese men find a way, even privately, to minister? Valid, orthodox episcopal oversight???

      Delete
    3. At 19.01

      Please accept my prayers. Please also consider another diocese or order. Compassion exists but often it is not near our doorstep.

      Delete
  18. Dermot Clifford is pictured above extinguishing light......

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  19. Was it John McAreevy who made an apology to his Clergy for basically treating them like crap and taking them for granted? How do these people get these jobs? The Nuncio is keeping very quiet and not running around the Country like his predecessor (who incidentally had no experience of the job either).

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  20. I challenged an American archbishop about his drinking. He had three large whiskeys before driving me to a retreat centre, where he drank a whole bottle of wine and then drove me back to his house, where he hit the cocktail cabinet again. I announced that I was leaving my post. The next day he sent a hand-delivered letter with the vicar general announcing that he was sacking me. The Chancery cancelled my work visa, so I immediately became an illegal immigrant and the car that I was driving was reported as missing. The Immigration and Naturalisation Service were informed and of course the police. Neither got involved really because they could see what was going on. The INS gave me a 'Voluntary Departure' visa.

    Approximately one month later, the archbishop had a net thrown over him by his college of consultors, his appointment diary was cleared and he was installed in the Mayo Clinic. He tried to dig a pit in my path and fell in it himself, hopefully for the better.

    In faith,
    Brother Jim

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  21. Surely any parish or diocese has a qualified H R on their payroll.
    Please tell me that dioceses are run properly like any modern day business

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    Replies
    1. You may be led to think that they do but as Pat portrayed earlier they are a law all unto themselves and its not necessarily God's law's they are abiding by but who can the rule and lord over. As for HR well securlar in somethings only ruthless in others.

      Delete
    2. Some of the them have financial committees and do Annual Finance Reports which are independently audited. That part is fine but the bishop's role is a more extensive management role than that as some of today's excellent posters have pointed out in detail.

      Delete
  22. I used to work in a retreat house in the morning and at my usual paid employment in the afternoon. Behaviour in my work place was far better than in the retreat house. People communicated clearly and politely. Everyone was treated with respect and the work was done very efficiently. Several times priests travelled over 50 miles to meet with the bishop and he never turned up. Lunch was once laid on...and he didn't turn up or even ring. In the outside world we would call that bad manners and as they say manners are minor morals.

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    Replies
    1. You're right about bad manners. Not turning up and wasting someone else's time is the height of arrogance.

      Delete
    2. Oh yes bad manners indeed, retreat houses are welcoming places for all pilgrims.
      Some Bishops however just want their rings kissed and not necessarily the ones on their fingers.

      Delete
    3. A very ignorant, unnecessary and infantile comment Big Hank @ 22.31. As your name suggests - "Big Mouth", rather uncouth....go back to school....

      Delete
  23. Good contributions today. Priests sadly have been pushed into great anger. Those of us on the ground, as it were, know only too well the realities we face. For many decades we saw the shifting sands but our Bishops refused to listen to us. They had to stick rigidly to Rome's agenda. We priests spoke out at various gatherings but to no avail. All gatherings were PR stunts - a pretence. Some useful ideas and visions were shared. Now in this time we find ourselves trying to re-define our role and ministry against the background of much indifference, apathy and a growing secularism which sees the Church pushed to the fringes. We also know that most of our Bishops will protect themselves first and foremost and couldn't give a damn about our personal well being. In our way of life you become a persona non grata all too easily and we feel very fearful. However, some parish communities are living examples of witness to the gospel of Christ. That's where I find my hope and inspiration and will continue to do so. We seem as a Church very lost in making ourselves relevant. We have no true "prophets" in leadership who are prepared to speak the truth with great honesty or humility. Those of us with years of service try not to be disillusioned but remain committed to what we believe Christ would want us to do. One day, perhaps, our Bishops will realise that the foot soldiers are relevant and deserve their gratitude, respect and support. Yes, Bishops are human too but showing empathy, compassion and good leadership are essential requisites, moreso today than ever - for their priests and all parishioners in their respective Diocese. We keep praying. Dublin P.P.

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  24. The Unite union has a CoE branch. Maybe they could be invited to organise in N Ireland? http://www.unitetheunion.org/how-we-help/list-of-sectors/community-youth-workers-and-not-for-profit/faithorganisations/churchofenglandclergyadvocates/

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  25. Time for bishops to be elected by their peers like priors, abbots or superiors. Knowing that in 3 or 6 years he'd be an ordinary Joe again would keep many a bishop in check.

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    Replies
    1. I was just about to tell you that the Church is not a democracy (re /electing bishops) but it is a hierarchy.
      Then I remembered that the Pope is elected!

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    2. It's hierarchy not higher-archy.

      Delete
    3. As a result of varioys bi-lateral agreement, e.g. Germany's Reichskonkordat with the Holy See of 1933) many German and Swiss dioceses elect their iwn bishops. The Vatican ratifies the election. Why not in Ireland too? People like Clifford would never have had the remotest chance of election.

      Delete
    4. Pat, why not open a Rate-my-bishop post to include current and retired candidates? We could vote on each one we knew.

      Delete
  26. father good to c u on grindr and tanxs 4 da chat it was helpful. keep up da good work x

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  27. Bishops hurting priests? Perhaps they should use KY.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Perhaps you should pour yourself a glass and fix yourself a cocktail.

      Delete
  28. I understood that it is a legal requirement for any business interviewing to have a H R etc on the panel
    How can church people interview without adherence to protocol
    Are they above the law?

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    Replies
    1. There are no interviews for episcopal appointments. New bishops emerge as if by magic.

      Delete
  29. There are dioceses that have HR departments, but they are for the lay workers who are employed. Although they do help the clergy with their tax returns!

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  30. informative post! I really like and appreciate your work, thank you for sharing such a useful facts and information about grievance procedure hr strategies, keep updating the blog, hear i prefer some more information about jobs for your career hr jobs in hyderabad .

    ReplyDelete