Tuesday, 9 January 2018

A sickness has infected the Catholic church in Scotland
Kevin McKenna THE GUARDIAN 7.1.18

Not an ounce of compassion has been shown to survivors of sex abuse; if the hierarchy doesn’t wake up the church will not survive in the 21st century



Archbishop Philip Tartaglia with a copy of the McLellan report into historical sex abuse in the Catholic church. Two years on, the church has not contacted victims. Photograph: Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images
Sun 7 Jan ‘18 00.02 GMT


The dawn of the new year brought with it an old tale with some familiar themes for the Catholic church in Scotland. These included an attitude towards some of its most vulnerable and damaged members that bordered on callous.

It was revealed that more than two years after the conclusion of the McLellan report into historical sex abuse in the church no contact has been made with victims’ groups. The report was compiled and delivered by the Very Reverend Dr Andrew McLellan, a former moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland. He expressed astonishment at the Catholic hierarchy’s conduct.

McLellan’s report reviewed child protection and safeguarding policies and the church’s leaders greeted it with apparent humility and honeyed phrases. The archbishop of Glasgow, Philip Tartaglia, issued what sounded like a genuine and heartfelt apology. Two years on, his contrite tone rings hollow in the ears of many survivors of sex abuse in the Catholic church.

The Catholic church’s response is pitiless: why are you making trouble now, so long after the event?

The clumsy attempt by the church to ridicule McLellan’s claims was chillingly familiar to those who have found themselves on its wrong side in recent years. A spokesperson said this: “Crucially, no individual or organization has a monopoly on survivor representation or interaction. Contact with survivors, by its nature confidential, is taking place across the church. Many survivors do not identify with or join national groups and such groups should not presume to speak for them.”

Essentially, we are being told that we must trust in the integrity of the Catholic church in Scotland to do the right thing and not ask any questions. The statement possessed not an ounce of compassion and was vaguely threatening. Why on earth would anyone ever trust this outfit?

The survivors’ groups do speak for many who have suffered sexual abuse within the Catholic church. I have met several of these people and listened to their stories. The raw pain of their abuse at a time in their lives when they were at their most vulnerable and most trusting of the church is indescribable. It is a blend of hurt, fury and sadness beyond any I have ever encountered. It comes from being grievously hurt by someone you love dearly and finding deep down, after all that has happened, there is still love there and that it is still being abused.
The response is pitiless: why are you making trouble now, so long after the event? Why are you being so disloyal? Why are you questioning our authority? The lickspittles who refuse to see any evil in their beloved church will try to insist there have been very few reported cases of abuse. There are also very few reported cases of rape in this country and this is due to a sense of shame, the continuing trauma of the attack and a fear of being treated badly by the police and the courts. These same reasons have stopped some victims of Catholic sex abuse coming forward.

A sickness has infected the Catholic church in Scotland which has left it vulnerable to the predations of a loud and implacable anti-Christian body in government and on Holyrood’s most influential committees. Those who insist on upholding the teachings of the church are set upon and wrongly accused of sexism and homophobia. We are one nation and many cultures apparently, but not if your culture is a traditionally Christian one. The absence of strong leadership in the Scottish church and its behaviour over the scandal of sex abuse fuels the hostility of its opponents. It gives them hope that they are one step closer to their goal of creating an atheist totalitarian state.

The signs of decay in the church are not difficult to detect. This year is the centenary of the 1918 Education Act which saw the birth of Catholic schools in Scotland.  If the Scottish Catholic hierarchy doesn’t wake up soon there will be no such thing as a Catholic education to celebrate for much longer. Last year the Scottish Catholic Education Service (SCES) failed to lift a finger to save the 140-year-old St Joseph’s primary school near Glasgow. After numerous entreaties for assistance it became clear to school campaigners that the SCES was just another indolent Catholic lay body that exists to provide its bosses with a seat near the top table at Glasgow’s annual archbishop’s ball. The phrase “chocolate teapot” is never far away when assessing the use of this outfit.

In its traditional heartlands, dozens of once vibrant old churches are shutting their doors. They have been rendered obsolete by a crisis of faith among its young people and by the few priests available. The profound sense of betrayal over the conduct of the church in first attempting to cover up its crimes and misdemeanours, followed by its heartless response, has contributed to the falling numbers. In one case a few weeks ago, a trusted and loyal church helper received a visit from two retired cops now running “a security business” after she’d had the temerity to question the new and very well-connected priest’s methods.

Such tactics will be familiar to the journalist Catherine Deveney who broke the story about Cardinal Keith O’Brien’s sexual misconduct five years ago. Deveney subsequently received a slew of deeply unpleasant communications from senior church officials for having done so. She had come up against “the Scottish inquisition”, a small cadre of hard-right and ultra-traditional lay officers who now wield disproportionate influence at all levels of the church in the absence of anything resembling proper leadership. They are encouraged by a vindictive group of reactionaries and ultramontanes who rail against Pope Francis’s compassion and understanding for gay Catholics and divorcees. Instead they would rather intimidate pregnant women seeking an abortion with all-night vigils outside hospitals, the Catholic equivalent of a picket line.


The Catholic church in Scotland is in deep, deep crisis. The Protestant reformation in Scotland more than 450 years ago helped the old church to break free from corruption and superstition. A second one is now sorely needed if the Catholic church in Scotland is to survive in any meaningful way in the 21st century.


PAT SAYS:

Scottish Catholics are traditionally, very loyal to their church - but at the moment many Scottish are in great distress about the state of their Church and the bad leadership it has.

Of course, the bad leadership is an international problem, but this poverty of this leadership is particularly evident in Scotland.

I hear very regularly from disillusioned Scottish Catholics.

Only a few years ago they had to deal with the fall out caused by the arch-hypocrite Keith O'Brien.

And sadly some of O'Brien's "gang" are still in leadership in the Scottish RC Church.

Tartaglia is a big part of the problem. He was an "Obrien-ite" and was also on friendly terms with the disgraced president of Maynooth Michael Ledwith.

His Italian mindset and connections allow him to be as he is.

Tartaglia has his clique in the Scottish church and among the Scottish bishops.

The homosexual issue is also a big issue in Scotland - the homosexualization of the Scottish priesthood.



Priests like Father Matthew Despard and Father Patrick Lawson have been disciplined for speaking publicly about the rot in the Scottish Church.

FR, PATRICK LAWSON

But they are up against the powerful and corrupt Scottish Catholic mafia.

The only hope there is - is that this mafia will eventually self destroy!

113 comments:

  1. Apparently, the population of Glasgow has decreased by half since 1950, so I it must be a BIG problem trying to maintain "dozens of once vibrant old churches". It's the same in the Edinburgh.

    I read on here recently, one commentator saying, for example, Down and Connor (I think) has investments of €140 million -- and that's just one of twenty-six.

    I don't think the of the Archdiocese of Glasgow, or all eight Scottish dioceses put together would have anything like that figure.

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    1. So plenty of thriving parishes in the suburbs? Lol

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    2. Why are you laughing, 21:40? Are you insane?

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    3. I think he or she was laughing at the collapse of the post-Vatican II church.

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  2. Its just the same as Ireland, there is no genuine change, just a better awareness of PR moments. This is what happens when the clerics do not believe in the message.

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  3. One twitter response suggested the headline should read "The Catholic Church ARE a sickness in Scotland".

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    1. Oh I know! - - That's Twitter for you...

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    2. Difficult decisions around mergers and closures need to be taken but the Bishops aren’t going far enough and aren’t being radical enough. Perhaps the good Lord will make everything ok.

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    3. That's a complacent "managing decline" comment. The commission was to "teach ye all nations", not "close ye all churches".

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    4. Should have read: 'the INSTITUTIONAL Catholic Church is a sickness in Scotland.' (And everywhere else, mind.)πŸ˜†

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  4. I haven't read Fr Despard's book, or know anything about Fr Lawson, but I imagine they're both closet pulpit whatsitnames.

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    1. It's Desparade

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    2. Haven't read the book either. Coffee-table reading? Or more a magnus opus?

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    3. Usual slanderous comments by the lavender mafia aimed at anyone that tries to expose them @ 08:05.

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  5. More of the same The church is infected and who will fix it. The answer is nobody except the ordinary people on the ground who sadly seem to be keeping very quiet

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    1. whats the church infected with? and don't say homosexuals.

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    2. The Church is affected by leadership which is too casual and without inspiration and forward vision.
      The Church is affected by the magnetic pull,away from it, towards other "gods" of modern media and sport etc
      Most of all, the Church is affected by the absence of daily prayer in every household.

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    3. 9.08 The ordinary people on the ground have no power. The bishop have absolute power. I would like bishops to be elected for a 5 year period, with a chance of another 5 years if they are any good at it. The should be accountable to the priests and parishioners. The style of medieval monarchy cannot work in the third millennium.

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    4. 13.45 The people on the ground have been conditioned to believe they have no power. It took me 50 years t realise the ordinary people are the church and have power to act. The church of Jesus time was made up of socalled rejects and outsiders

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    5. 18.01 I agree with you that the people are the church, but when closures come, they will not be consulted. We have a new priest from Kerala. He will think it is his parish. The bishop will think it s his franchise. However the people whose families have supported and paid for everything for 3/4 generations who are under the illusion it is their parish will be in for a dreadful shock if it is c!loses down. They naΓ―vely believe that the bishop cares about them

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    6. Excellent point, 19:57. I think that most Catholics think of the parish church as something they own, have built, have a stake in, have cared for and have memories of significant events. Think of ratepayers regarding town halls, parks and leisure centres, but much more so as people were baptised, received First Holy Communion, were Confirmed, Married, Ordained, Buried from there. Bishops see them as brick and mortar assets but they are more than that.

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  6. The institutional Church reveals yet again its human flaws, failings and inability to truly renew within. The Church will struggle on but unless the Holy Spirit is allowed breakthrough, unless we have humble, caring shepherds, unless we strive to live the gospel of Christ without strangling it with rules, bureaucracy, laws and unaccountability, the Institutional Church will die. Thankfully there are small christian communities who ate faithful to the spirit of Christ, thankfully we have many, many good parishioners who inspire and who certainly keep me aware, awake and alert in my ministry. Yet, our culture and societal norms sometimes present huge challenges to "keep giving witness" to Christ. With peiests now almost on their own in parishes, the task of being truly what we are called to be is often problematic and difgicult. But I keep trusting the Holy Spirit!

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    1. Yes, lets get rid of the Commandments and the hard teachings of the Gospel, including on divorce and remarriage. They are so boring and old hat and Jesus was mistaken, obviously and Pope Francis has rightly corrected him.

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    2. If you are a priest @09:48, is the "institutional church" the one that has fed, clothed and housed you for years? And when you gaze at your diminishing flock at Mass do you feel any guilt for the fact that the congregation consists of silver haired coffin dodgers?

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  7. MourneManMichael9 January 2018 at 10:19

    On starting to read this I'd expected some information in the form of hard facts. There are very few, other than that a report was published, but has apparently been largely ignored by the RC hierarchy.
    As it reads, there's a lot of opinion and views expressed, and I've little doubt those holding them have good reasons, and are in possession of hard facts. But as it reads, it could well be dismissed as just another anti catholic rant.
    I have no views on the state of the Scottish RC church in the absence of hard information, and would find a shorter blog with some facts to consider.
    MMM

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    1. MourneManMichael9 January 2018 at 12:24

      ......some facts to consider MORE USEFUL.
      Sorry, I left those last two words out above.
      MMM

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    2. A very fair and balanced reaction from you, MMM.

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  8. Fr Lawson is a very troubled individual. He caused much upset for many at the 3 seminaries he was sent to.

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    2. this page should not be on today as it is subjudicy as it is due before the High Court in February so any comments about Father Lawson should be removed. also Father Despard has an appeal at the Holy See so therefore should not be discussed. sadly if you continue to discuss Father Lawson you may allow his alleged accused off at the court.

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    3. Magna go back to studying the scriptures!

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    4. Magna, go back to bed..

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    5. I thought that Fr D was now fit to return but subject to conditions placed on him by Bishop Toal? All gone quiet!

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    6. Bishop Toal does not want him in his diocese as his appeal was only part held up.
      However some say Father Despard has health problems.
      So who knows only Bishop Toal and him however he like the rest that are on sabbatical or suspended are all C/O Diocesan offices.

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    7. Magna Carta is a very troubled individual. He caused much upset at the 2 seminaries he was sent to.

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  9. MMM at 10.19, I agree with you. It's very difficult to know what to believe anymore in relation to selectively chosen articles. Journalists and bloggers use what's advantageous to their agenda. Sadly but predictably we get lots of "agendas" here. As a priest I rarely get encouragement by contributers on this blog. You, of all contributors seem fair, honest, balanced and always make your points intelligently, coherently and well thought out. You rarely make personal jibes, ridicule or disrespect others. Your observation this morning is correct. I only wish Pat would take your lead. Proper, verifiable facts and information are essential for truth and justice. While I have huge difficulties with the Institutional Church, I remain because I believe in the essence of the gospel and I am affirmed in simply looking after the "vineyard" given to me. And while I may not share all your insights and arguments, MMM, you challenge with your arguments.

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    1. MournemanMichael9 January 2018 at 14:39

      Thank you anon @13:28.
      While you may not get much encouragement from blog contributions hopefully you do get positive affirmation from parishoners appreciative of your effort in your part of the vineyard. And there will be others who though appreciative seldom express it: we're not the most demonstrative in that respect.
      Sadly I think the blog has recently regressed into over personalised ad hominem point scoring and tit for tat retaliation.
      There's many colours in the global rainbow and from where I stand I can only see a few. When I describe what I see I prefer those who see different colours to describe them to me that I might consider the extent their vision influences and alters my own. Telling me that I'm blind can affect my hearing too!
      MMM

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  10. Glasgow like Larne has a small Passionist community in St Mungos, having stayed there and witnessed the odd ordination over the last 40 years I have seen the decline in numbers.
    In a recent visit they might aswell have not opened the doors for a Sunday celebration. Yeah you will hear all the afore mentioned reasons of media, home prayer, secularism, bla bla bla and bla.
    They may well think that these the right reasons but lets face it, these have just been the self appointed profferings of the establishment. The lets not talk about or feed the elephant in the room as to do so is DOOM.

    I say give me another Scotch please and lets talk honestly.

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    1. 15.14: Big Hank, are you really as illiterate as what you've just blogged? Such utter raimeas - rubbish. Utter and complete rubbish. Go back to school. You add nothing intelligently to this blog.

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    2. The Passionists, Franciscans, SJs, Sisters of Mercy etc, etc, will all be gone in 30 years. They renewed themselves into oblivion. Only the trad orders thrive.

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    3. 95% of all religious orders are extinct.

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    4. They were thriving until the 1960s.

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  11. Almost 3 years ago, the Archbishop of Glasgow announced that the Holy Father had granted his request for an Auxiliary Bishop, announcement to come within months. Nearly 3 years later, still no appointment. I wonder why? Look at recent goings on with Cathedral Dean leaving to live with his long term partner, the headlines around the VG and his his housekeeper, a Priest from the North of Glasgow suspended and under investigation for certain offences, another 2 have left suddenly without notice, one of the favourites for Auxiliary is in an openly gay relationship and has for years etc. I do worry about the stress on +Philip trying to manage all that. I think he is a decent and honourable man working under very difficult circumstances.

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    1. Well I think you maybe correct as it was a different +Tartaglia in Paisley was amazing right on the ball faced parish closures and parishes straight on and since went to Glasgow he has had a heart attack and just links parishes and yes he is undertrain.
      However the one about his VG was suppose to be all cleared and as for the Auxillary the names in Glasgow are Paul Conroy, Hughes and Hill and I do not think anyone of them is in any relationship.
      As if any priests were in relationships +Tartaglia would have them out or suspended likely no truth in this accusation.
      +Tartaglia is 67 on Thursday so needs an assistant but maybe he like Cardinal Winning may wish him to be his successor when Rome maybe saying NO.
      Anyhow Bishop Keenan is the man in waiting for Glasgow.

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    2. There is another Priest in the running too who is gay and agreed, none of the above are in relationships although the VG handled the whole papers thing around his housekeeper badly and could have avoided it. Doubtful he will get it. I don’t agree about the fact that the Arch would have Clergy suspended who are in relationships. He is very aware of at least 3 I know about and turns a blind eye as long as it’s discreet. Rome approved an Auxiliary 3 years ago, so we must assume that whoever was offered it actually refused it, or Rome changed their mind. Pray for +Philip. He is a good man.

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  12. I've the dinner on. what are the rest of ye having?

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    1. I'm away off to Pugin Hall for a sausage supper.

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    2. I had a curry chip and two fat and tasty bangers, followed by coffee and two thick shortbreads made with butter.

      Yum!😊

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    3. I don't think your allowed to do that sort of thing in Pugin Hall

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    4. "I don't think you're allowed..."

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  13. 15.30. First initial of the possible auxiliary who is in an openly gay relationship?

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    1. No good to speculate but we’ll all know who they are. Struggling like the rest of us I suspect.

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    2. Starting with "T"
      It must be Timothy... Yes?

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    3. Starting with "T"
      It must be Timothy... Yes?

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    4. Auxiliary Bishop of Termonfeckin10 January 2018 at 10:47

      A well-known Tim has first dibs of every Irish episcopal vacancy (except Clogher), but Vatacanistas report that he is not in the running for any pointy hats on the mainland.

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    5. What do you mean by the "mainland"? That word needs very careful usage, didn't you know?

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    6. GB, not the Continent.

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  14. Perhaps you should also add into the mix at least half a dozen “ priests” all under 50, all living in diocesean properties, some right plush pads, all being supported from central funds and none of whom have done a turn ages nor even want to do supply. ++ Philip should tell them where to get off and how quickly!

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    1. Agreed. The Arch is also living in a multi million pad in the South of Glasgow that cost a fortune to renovate as the retired Arch wanted to stay in the other multi million pounds Villa. I don’t grudge them a decent place to live but we are talking central funds paying for all this.

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    2. Better than JSA or Universal Credit. Fair play to them, the 79 year old priests can say the Masses.

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    3. This is a new thing, retired PPs and bishops refusing to move out when they retire. Have they not heard of tied accommodation?

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    4. Joe Duffy of Clogher had no time for that sort of nonsense. He put his predecessor, Bishop Patrick Mulligan, into a public sector old folks home, and in a published letter Joe boasted that Patrick was having his fees paid by the state, and that he was treated no better than any other resident of the home.

      When, to the relief of the priests of Clogher, Joe retired, the diocese bought him a house, even though there are plenty of empty rooms in presbyteries in the diocese, Enniskillen being a notorious example.

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    5. Do you realise, Clogher curate, that every time you comment (assuming it's just one of you), the thunder thighs Presbyterian who works on Lough Derg during the season is tasked by Joe McG to hunt you down. Wise up or you'll never be made PP of Fintona.

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    6. The Archdiocese of Glasgow owned Archbishop Philips house in Saint Andrews drive and it is worth 495K not millions.
      As for the Oaks again owned by the Archdiocese and + Philip did not want to put Archbishop Conti out although worth nearly million.
      Do no know any T who maybe new Assistant Bishop and No approval from Rome as yet.

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    7. Why does a retired, unmarried Archbishop need a £1m house?

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  15. "... 2 have left suddenly without notice"

    That sort of thing will come as no surprise to readers of this blog.

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  16. All of this gives me a more understanding insight as to the hatred expressed towards Catholicism by the reformers most of whom were originally clerics themselves.

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    1. They did not hate Catholicism so much as ROMAN Catholicism. But I appreciate your comment.

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    2. No such thing as Roman Catholicism. It's Protestants who call us that, and I believe that it's only in the English language that the term exists.

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    3. No such thing as 'Roman' Catholicism? Raise yer head from the proverbial sand and we'll have a (intelligent) chat.

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    4. Don’t know what your religious affiliation is
      I’m an Rc whether I like it or not,

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    5. MournemanMichael9 January 2018 at 23:45

      Anon@22:53: If you don't like it do you feel able to opt out from it?
      There could be 'different levels of opt out, such as withdrawing any and all involvement in its practices or on the other hand while rejecting its professed beliefs privately, publically maintaining observance for familial or commercial reasons.
      So what might it be that could 'make you an RC? Could it be a perception that once 'incorporated' as an RC by baptism and cradle catholic upbringing one henceforth has no option?
      Would be interesting to know your views.
      MMM

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    6. MMM, yes a cradle Rc, baptised, always went to Sunday mass.
      Now that I’m retired and not many years left, I’ve time to think and read and do more thinking about life and end of life....so I haven’t a clue really.
      So now I do miss mass the odd Sunday, don’t really believe it’s sinful.Lots of things I thought were sinful aren’t.
      I will probably continue being a Rc...although I know that living a Christian life is all that is needed.

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    7. The Catechism of the Catholic Church and Vatican II's documents not once use the RC term. It was popularised in the English speaking world after the Reformation and its use accelerated when the Oxford Movement invented the branch theory. Ian Paisley always, always used the term Roman Catholic, rather than Catholic, as do other hardline Protestants. That says a lot.

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    8. That's right, and I'd add that there are 24 churches in the Catholic Church, the biggest being the Western Church, the others being the 23 Eastern Churches. The term "Church of Rome", also beloved of Paisley, refers to the Diocese of Rome, not to the wider Catholic Church.

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    9. MourneManMichael10 January 2018 at 20:04

      Thank you Anon @ 00:56.
      I don't think you need to worry too much about the fine detail of RC practices, for you've got the essentials right: in your words, "leading a Christian life".
      While theologians, biblical scholars et al may well argue over the essence of Christianity, I'm neither interested nor bothered by such esoteric debates. To my mind, behaving considerately as one would wish others to do similarly , otherwise known as the Golden Rule, is a sound and sensible option irrespective of whether the origins of one's behaviour is derived from ethical principles alone, or arises from religious belief.
      MMM

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  17. The mad puck goat seen in Kenmare today in black suit and Roman collar. So he's not a Ryanair trolley dolly, unless doing the double. Deacons probably don't get paid much.

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    1. Had he on his jock strap

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    2. When I next have WiFi I'll check his photos on Fabguys, where all the lads in Top Marys migrated to after Dermo exposed the Grindr strange goings-on.

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  18. Sad news this evening. Seamus Freeman Bishop Emeritus of Ossory has died. May he rest in peace.

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    1. Are you sure I have look on their web site and the news and there is nothing about this....

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    2. Fake news! What else’s new!

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  19. Don’t think it will be John Keenan for Glasgow. Although he is doing a good job in Paisley he is far to young to be translated to Glasgow. What’s more like all the “certainties “ they seldom get the shout. Hughes stands best chance. Well connected in Rome. However if they go down the co adjutor route then Bob Hill is a good bet.

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    1. No way they are going to leave John Keenan in Paisley for 25 Years its Glasgow for him.
      Sadly Bishop Toal's eye sight is failing so next vacancy maybe next.
      I agree no one in Clyde Street Curia will get an Assistants job.
      Lost in who T is.
      Hughes is not fit in health for AX. B

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    2. "translated" to Glasgow? (@ 18.50)
      Or "transfered"?

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    3. Translate is the ecclesiastically preferred verb. As you know it’s a cognate of transfer.

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  20. T is a new one on me. I thought P ?

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    1. It's a big Archdiocese, many things are possible. Going with T.

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    2. Yes P for me

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  21. It seems you don't count the calories Magna?

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    1. Oh, yes! You were referring to my comment at 18:47. Sorry: I'd forgotten.

      No, I don't count calories.

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  22. I would agree with 21.03. I think T will be aux although someone earlier mentioned RH. Would be a good choice as well. A good priest. I would agree that no one in the troop in Clyde Street will get a call from the Nuncio.
    I also think that Big Phil’s heart attack has knocked the stuffing out of the guy. His is a heavy mitre to wear. Also don’t think John Keenan will ever get the pallium.

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  23. Can anyone give me a schema of Father Despard's book? Please.

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    1. Fundamentally, it seems Fr Despard had been propositioned by every man he has ever met in his life. I expect you know the feeling.

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    2. Yes, I do, actually. Being fair haired, blue-eyed and slim (some would protest 'athletic!' here).

      But I, being ever so humble, would, of course, say no such thing.πŸ˜†

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    3. This is a flippant and inaccurate remark. Fr. Despard was propositioned by several priests (hardly a surprise to us here). He regards the Scottish Church as deeply corrupted by a significant predatory homosexual clique and this is clearly true of the whole western Church and the process began decades ago. We see the top of the iceberg and then only a few of us who are looking for it. The homosexuals began undermining the Church in the sixties (I remember the sixties) and they have succeeded beyond their wildest dreams. A reckoning is coming to them and people like Fr. Despard will be the cause.

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    4. Jeez, 00:41! You sound apocalyptic and important. May I worship you?πŸ˜†

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    5. Commenting at 01:10? Wheels obviously well-oiled.

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    6. “Fair-haired, blue-eyed and slim”? In your dreams, Maggers LOL. That’s your “type” though, isn’t it? ;-)

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    7. My thoughts exactly. A wish list more like.

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    8. 00:41’s narrative that gay began in 1960s is really humourous.
      Next (s) be constructing a relationship of proptwr hoc between Vatican II and this phenomenon.

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    9. 20:07 please note that I didn't say that 'gay began in the sixties' - wish it were true - but that the organised and determined undermining of the Church by those suffering this disorder began in earnest at that time. And see how well they have done.
      MC - I love a reasoned argument, when will we hear something other than snide remarks from you on any subject?

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  24. +Pat, today's blog is too tiresome, we expect better. Demand a bukkake scandal at Maynooth, please!

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    1. 'Bukkake'? What the Hell you talkin' 'bout?

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    2. Prefect of the Dunboyne Establishment10 January 2018 at 11:36

      You don't know? As if.

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  25. I have a copy. Where would you like it sent to?

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  26. Interesting comments by the former Anglican ++Canterbury about the Celtic Church myth, on which the CoI (lol) relies, even though their adherents mostly have English surnames as they only arrived at the Plantation http://liturgicalnotes.blogspot.co.uk/2018/01/rowan-williams-on-celtic-church.html?m=1

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  27. I’ve noticed quite a few smiling Irish eyes amongst what used to be a dour bunch of CofI clergy. And can it be that the CofI will truly become the CofI because the Vatican boys have vexed the Irish for so long? Plus they have Evensong.

    (Personally I’d prefer the Orthodox because they have the “funnest” liturgies in the world. I especially like the Russians because I love Slavonick, and they usually slip a little vodka into my coffee after Liturgy.)

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  28. I fail to agree that John Keenan will get a move to Glasgow ( or translated as someone used- quite correctly). He is originally a Glasgow priest but far too young. I don’t think the Vatican will want another Tom Winning long distance situation. There are a number of older, very capable candidates. I would reckon whoever becomes Aux although not titled coadjutor will eventually succeed. That may well be a cleric serving the the city’s east end! Any thoughts anyone?

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  29. In many of the videos of the official YouTube channel of St Patrick's College, Maynooth, Brendan Marshall turns up like a bad penny. Likewise on the Irish Episcopal Conference Flickr page. It's not as if he's photogenic. In one Flickr photo he and CG flank a woman, who, obviously, is of no interest to the two lads.

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  30. It has been obvious to me for many years now that virtually all places of worship in this country are corrupt and full of lies and deceit
    This includes all faiths
    Any Truly good people in the churches are being lied to and deceived by the evil people who have taken over.
    These people in power do what they like, using the church to create an image of their false goodness and respectability
    They preach the word of God in the pulpit but they either do not believe in any God or they are really Satan Worshipers and think that nothing will ever happen to them and are all having a jolly laugh at taking over the houses of God
    Their time is coming!

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