Sunday, 25 February 2018

Vatican Monsignor  judge accused of possessing child pornography accepts plea deal
Feb 21, 2018


Pope Francis poses with members of the Roman Rota on the occasion of his annual address to members of the court at the Vatican Jan. 29. The Rota is the highest appeals court in the Catholic Church. (CNS/L'Osservatore Romano)
VATICAN CITY — A judge on a top Vatican tribunal was given a 14-month suspended sentence by an Italian court for possessing child pornography and sexual molestation. He then resigned his position on the Roman Rota, the tribunal.
According to the Italian newspaper La Stampa, Msgr. Pietro Amenta, a judge on the Rota, a court that deals mainly with marriage cases, accepted the terms of plea bargain Feb. 14.
In an email to Catholic News Service Feb. 21, Paloma Garcia Ovejero, vice director of the Vatican press office, said the Italian monsignor "resigned as prelate auditor of the Roman Rota last week" following his conviction.
Amenta was detained by police in March 2017 after he was accused of fondling an 18-year-old man in a public square in Rome. The young man followed him and called the police, who subsequently took Amenta into custody, Italian newspapers reported.
In the investigation that followed, police apparently found pornographic images involving minors on the monsignor's personal computer. The Italian press also said the investigators discovered that Amenta was accused of "obscene acts" in 1991 and sexual molestation in 2004. Neither of those allegations led to a conviction.
Amenta had worked in the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Sacraments from 1996 to 2012. According to the Annuario Pontificio, the Vatican yearbook, he was also a member of several special Vatican commissions, including commissions within the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith and the Congregation for the Clergy.
In early February, the Vatican City State prosecutor, Gian Piero Milano, said that his office was recently made aware of "two cases of different configuration and relevance within the scope of crimes against people, particularly against minors."
"The investigations underway are in the preliminary stages and are being carried out dutifully with absolute discretion out of respect for all people involved, as well as with the firm determination to probe into all the factual, juridical and human aspects regarding the validity and the contents of the alleged crimes, in search of the truth," Milano said Feb. 3 at a session marking the beginning of the Vatican tribunal's judicial year.

Milano did not name either of the suspects in the two cases, but since the Italian court decision was announced, it was assumed that Amenta's case was one of them. The other is presumed to be that of Msgr. Carlo Capella, a former Vatican diplomat recalled from service in Washington in 2017 shortly after the Vatican was notified by the U.S. Department of State "of a possible violation of laws relating to child pornography images by a member of the diplomatic corps of the Holy See accredited to Washington."
An arrest warrant was also issued in Canada for Capella one month later for accessing, possessing and distributing child pornography.

The Vatican promoter of justice, the chief prosecutor for Vatican City State, "opened an investigation and has already commenced international collaboration to obtain elements relative to the case" against Capella, the Vatican said in late September.

VATICAN JUDGE FONDLED 18-YEAR-OLD YOUNG MAN IN THE STREET

Ed Condon Catholic Herard

Everyone in Rome says they want an end to abuse scandals. But will they do what it takes?
We canon lawyers, unfortunately, spend a lot of time dealing with tragic, disturbing, sometimes appalling situations. It’s all too easy to become inured. But even among canonists who routinely deal with cases of child sexual abuse, the news that Mgr Pietro Amenta, a senior Vatican judge, has been convicted of possessing child pornography is shocking.


AMENTA


Mgr Amenta was not a minor figure: he was a prelate auditor (judge) of the Roman Rota, the Church’s final judicial court of appeal. (It does not, thank God, have jurisdiction over abuse cases.) He also appears to have been well-known to the police, having been reported for alleged obscene acts and harassment in 1991 and 2004 respectively. (He was not charged.)
If this were an isolated act, it would be one thing. But it suggests a culture in parts of the Church which is still not taking abuse seriously enough. Even a cursory examination would have shown that Mgr Amenta’s appointment should have at least been delayed until matters were properly investigated.
This is not the only case of basic due diligence being skipped. Bishop Juan Barros denies all the allegations that he turned a blind eye to abuse. But in that story, too, we see the same failure to address concerns before appointing someone to a position of authority. The same goes for other cases. Last year, for instance, a Vatican diplomat was recalled from assignment to Washington, DC, after both American and Canadian authorities opened investigations into alleged child pornography offences.
There is still a great divide in the Church’s response to the sexual abuse scandals. Where these scandals have been most public, like the United States, the response has been clear, systematic, and robust. The creation of the Dallas Charter has brought a new era for the Church in America in which “zero-tolerance” means exactly that – indeed, in some cases the pendulum can be argued to have swung too far the other way. But elsewhere – despite solid and necessary legal reforms by Pope Benedict XVI, especially in the document Sacramentorum sanctitatis tutela, which centralised handling of sexual abuse cases and laid out a clear legal procedure to follow – Rome has continued to pursue a policy which in practice often appears little better than “don’t ask.”
Well-intentioned reformers have been baffled and dismayed by this attitude. The Pontifical Commission for the Protection of Minors, headed by Cardinal O’Malley and finally renewed this weekend, lost one of their high-profile members, the abuse survivor Peter Saunders, back in 2016 in large part over his frustration at Rome’s failure to respond proactively to growing indications of problems in South America, including in Chile.
Another former member of the Commission, Marie Collins, found progress frustratingly lacking when dealing with the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF), which handles all complaints of sexual abuse. While one has every sympathy with Collins, who speaks with obvious authority in the subject of sexual abuse, the CDF has its own legitimate frustrations. Time and again, what they have been offered is structural reform, new processes, working groups and commissions. What they need is manpower and resources, and a clear mandate to be proactive in their work; what they have got is a Vatican-wide hiring freeze since 2014.
Vatican authorities, including the Pope, must demonstrate to the world that child protection is not only about listening to victims. Listening is, of course, necessary, but as important is doing something about what you hear. Ask anyone in Rome and they will tell you they want to see an end to sexual abuse scandals. Suggest the kind of CDF expansion of manpower, resources, and authority needed to make this happen and you will get a far less enthusiastic response.

Mgr Amenta’s case, awful in itself, could have a been a chance to show initiative. Instead of being allowed to resign, and only confirming this to the press when asked, he should have been immediately and publicly removed from the Rota. His canonical trial should now proceed with all possible speed, and he should have the best canon lawyer that can be found for his defence. While respecting confidentiality of process, the verdict should also be properly publicised. It is time the Vatican spoke a little less about justice and did a lot more of it.

PAT SAYS:

Here we have another high profile case of sexual misconduct at the very heart of the Vatican curia.
Is it any wonder that these things are happening in seminaries and dioceses around the globe when they are also happening at the Vatican.
Pope Francis will be aware of much of this and I imagine those involved will do their best to keep him unaware of other stuff?
This constant stream of scandals is a massive sign that something is very rotten and dysfunctional at the heart of the institutional Church.
Why is nobody, including Francis, not saying that there is TOTAL DYSFUNCTION?
Surely highlighting and acknowledging the problem is the first stage of cure?
The problems reach from Rome to Dromore, from Armagh to Sydney, from Maynooth to Chile and from Dublin to Cape Town.
Who could, with honesty, encourage any young man to give his life to the service of such an organization?

86 comments:

  1. If I may say: you're headline is misleading for the laity. It looks like he was a lay man and a judge. He is a Monsignor. Just for those who might not read the text and only the headline!
    Also, I posted the following on the previous blog earlier and I'd like others to reflect on it:
    Has it struck you as odd that every time the Rome Grindr story is mentioned (and queries about the seminarian in the Irish College) a couple of hours pass and then there's a despairing comment posted by someone about it all being false. That tactic didn't work for Puck or Dublin Deacon. It shouldn't work in this case either.

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  2. A poster yesterday asked why so many Anglican clergy are gay. I am not in a position to confirm deny or answer the question because I don't know. Today I ask why is so much sexual impropriety linked to church people. A judge with porn points to a subject that needs to be unravelled

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    1. You are not in a position to confirm, deny or answer. You should have been a politician instead of being a Protestant clergyman.

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    2. 11.31 As "Fr Jack" in the programme Fr Ted might say "that would be an ecumenical matter"

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    3. Use humour all you want but you have turned into a Protestant Clergyman. Dress it up with humour and other excuses but the fact remains you are an apostate. So don’t come on here with your airs and graces. We all know your story in Sligo. Sheep stealer.

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    4. 15.42: I agree; Sean is becoming a bore, repetitive and meaningless. He is now on the other side. He should keep his observations and comments for them. Sligo is a memory still for many......good/indifferent/bad/couldn't care less....Move on Sean...

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    5. 15.42 17.23. I have moved on. It is folk on here who keep bringing it up.As for sides who's side was Jesus on. Did not Paul say I am for Apollos and I am for Paul. Ideally we should all be on the same side respecting differences. Is all this Christian unity stuff a load of bull and what do churches sign up to it.

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  3. It's all talk no action with Francis. Those closely associated with Francis include Mgr Amenta, bishop Barros, Fr Mauro Inzoli and Cardinal Coccpalmerio, who hosted a drug-fuelled gay orgy in his big apartment in the CDF palace.

    Had just one of these occured under Benedict they would be global front page news but Francis is given a free pass.

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    1. What a revealing and incorrect opening sentence at 08:05. No one has done as much as Francis to tackle sexual attraction to children in the church.

      This latest person worked in the Congregation for Divine Worship under Benedict at earlier stages in the Secretariat of State.

      So your cheap shot at impugning Francis is just that.

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    2. 10.11 Marie Collins resigned from the commission. Pope Francis accused people in Chile of calumny when they objected to Bishop Barros. He may have to back down there. When we have the Rotate Caeli website agreeing with Robert Mickens we know that we have an enormous problem. I am beginning to think that sexual abuse is so rife in the Church that do not think it is at all wrong. Until this is cleaned out the Church is going nowhere. It is poisoning the whole body.

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    3. Tell us, 10:11, what Francis has done. Cos if you're judging his record by the standards of his predecessors, then you ain't got much argument, now have you?😆

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    4. The two articles put up by Pat must be lies. Pope worshippers such as you would rather take the side of Francis over that of children who suffered at the hand of Inzoli. Benedict had defrocked Inzoli, only for Francis to bring him back in the name of Mercy. Inzoli abused again.

      Bishop Barros was appointed by Francis despite the strong opposition of the CDF. Barros is a voyeur who watched a priest abuse a child and he did nothing.

      At his installation in his cathedral Barros was heckled and jostled. It's on YouTube. Francis said that the bishop's detractors were slanderous and leftists.

      Francis also told a bare-faced lie when he said that no victims had approached the Vatican. This provoked a public rebuke from Cardinal O'Malley, who reminded the Pope that he had hand-delivered to Francis a letter from one of the victims in this case.

      No wonder the Boston Globe called Francis a company man.

      https://www.google.co.uk/amp/s/www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2018/01/19/pope-francis-company-man/kfE0f7wFLDuMN2Uqg2hbQL/amp.html

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    5. According to the Catholic Herald, Francis is quietly bringing back into ministry abusing priests, all in the name of mercy. Yet there's no mercy for the next set of victims that will occur because of these inexplicable papal decisions.

      Francis also dismissed three CDF priests who were working exclusively on the abuse cases. They were not replaced.

      Cardinal Mueller, the then Prefect of the CDF, asked Francis why the three priests had been dismissed. Francis gave a one sentence answer "Because I am the Pope" and he pointed to the door to indicate that the audience was over.

      The bishopwatch website has gathered evidence of Francis's poor record of handling abuse cases when he was in Argentina.

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    6. That is a total disgrace by Pope Francis.

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    7. 14:58 More desperate bottom of the barrell scraping by you.

      1. Check your Catholic Herald sources.

      2. Gerhard Ludwig Mühler asked that question of Francis only after being fired himself. Do some research and you’ll see why these operatives considered themselves untouchables.

      3. Francis is the Bishop of Rome. It took courage to fire the head of the CDF.

      4. Francis made many mistakes in Argentina. Those who wlected him were not unaware of his record. The Holy Spirit made no mistake at the conclave.

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    8. The anger directed against Barros during his Mass of Installation was relentless and unprecedented.

      Having watched footage on YouTube, I am shocked. I didn’t think it was as bad. The people were furious. The whole Mass was disrupted throughout.

      Even if Barros is guiltless, he should have cancelled the ceremony and got off side until some resolution could be found.

      What is most worrying is that he is probably not guiltless and, therefore, his narcissism and desire for power prevailed over common sense and reason.

      I like Pope Francis but I think he is blind in this matter.

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    9. @18:00 this kind of Pope worship confirms the worst fears of Protestants and the Orthodox. This deeply tainted Pope was elected by the machinations of the St Gallen Group, which included Mahoney, Danneels, Coccopalmerio and Murphy-O'Connor, all of whom should have been in prison.

      Forget this nonsense about the Holy Spirit and conclaves. Did the Holy Spirit elect the bad Popes?

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    10. 18:40 is this Catholic Herald source good enough for you? I think if Francis said a Black Mass in St Peter's Square there'd still be people who'd say he was wonderful. Personally I'm on the side of the victims of Inzoli and Barr os.

      http://www.catholicherald.co.uk/news/2017/02/27/pope-reduces-sanctions-against-some-paedophile-priests/

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    11. 06:13
      Try your damnest to disparage Francis! The conclave needed two-thirds + 1 of 115 for a valid election. You’ll have to take into account far more than the paltry few you mention here. Give up! You are a sedevacantist not a Roman Catholic.

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  4. He'll be pensioned off with no inquiry. I'd say he knows where all the bodies are buried.

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    1. A sad aspect about the blog subject today is that it seems the story might never have seen the light of day but for some seriously investigative lay reporting. It almost seems like burying a story is still the preferred option than exposing it for treatment. Not very encouraging. Also, I'm glad Pat distinguished between 'something rotten and dysfunctional' and 'total dysfunction'.

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  5. If Pat is being honest and willing to look within himself he might, and I say might be aware that he needs the dysfunction as he sees it to bolster himself and his worldview.
    It's like that he needs it for his own justification and purpose. It's like a crutch for him.
    It' s kind of sad really as there is so much more to life, where do we hear of you enjoying a day off or enjoying a beautiful sunset? Rarely.
    If all we do is pull others down to our level of regression that something is missing, in my oopinion.

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    1. He's only just back from holiday in Canaries Islands.

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    2. Pat has been on foreign holiday recently and enjoys lunches out often... Not saying where as I am not a gossip

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  6. Somehow, I don’t think the young men involved in Grindr, two-in-a-bed, or truck-stop quickies have needed much encouragement to enter seminary life. It’s just part and parcel of gay life.

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  7. @10.06 Your observations are very insightful.
    I was just wondering where do we ever hear of the love of God, the compassion of others like our neighbours and friends on this blog?
    Surely Pat must have some stories or when people were there for him in a kind and compassionate way?
    I survived cancer a number of years ago and it's funny how it totally changed my out look on life. I have a lot of gratitude for how other people helped me during a difficult period in my life and I always try to see the goodness in others even though I might not always succeed.

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    1. I was really touched by your comment. Good for you for seeing the goodness in others.
      Thankfully I have escaped illness. I can only imagine how painful and hurtful it must be to be affected by cancer. God bless the good work of the doctors and the medical teams.
      I also try to see the goodness of my neighbours. I can get on well with some of them but I can't say with all of them. I bring them to prayer as Jesus asks us to bless people who hurt us. Hopefully I will be filed with God's grace at some stage.

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    2. To 10.06 and 10.19
      Thank you both.
      That was so uplifting and refreshing to read... So different.
      God bless.

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    3. 10.19 I couldn't agree more. Some folks waste alot of energy on things that don't matter in the long run

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  8. Powerful interview on the wireless about the shooting of Aidan McAnanespie. My heart goes out to that family. They really suffered. Thank God we have peace now.
    I hope that family get justice.
    eternal rest grant to Aidan and welcome him to his place of peace.

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    1. I was listening to it to. I would recommend it so much if you are able to listen back on the rte web-site.
      Some people have really suffered. The community suffered also.
      They were honest to goodness people who never caused any harm to anyone and yet what they had to go through.
      It was lovely to hear how important their faith was to them.

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    2. I'm going to listen to it now.
      Thanks for sharing it with us.

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    3. @10.37 “Thank God we live in peace now” what peace? What planet are you on? People being shot dead, weekly punishment beatings and shootings. Peace is just a nice word or theory, we’ve never had peace here.

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    4. I heard it too. In fact I was listening to it so much I ended up going to a later Mass.
      My prayers are with all the victims of the troubles, both Catholic and Protestant.
      I remember those bleak dark and fear-filled days. I am glad that my grandchildren know nothing of what it was like to live so much in fear.
      Pat, could you not have a word with them politicians in Stormont and get them to work for peace.
      Didn't you serve on some council as an elected representative
      You leadership is needed at this time to solve with impasse.

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    5. Very moving.
      I was driving and turned it on about half way during the interview.
      They were sad times. We have moved on, and hopefully we'll continue to move in a healthy and positive way.

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    6. I believe peace is a frame of mind, an outlook on how we approach the world.
      There is a big difference from turning on the radio and how many people, innocent people, were shot during the night.
      We always live in troubled times, thankfully people are no longer shot because they are Catholic or Protestant.
      Our Lady, Queen of Peace; pray for us.

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    7. 11.27 I feel frustrated that we still don't have a functioning elected assembly in the north. What are the politicians doing at all? How long is this going to continue?
      We have come so far and it's about time that we saw the politicians take up their seats and show leadership.

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  9. What has the murder of the Sinn Fein activist Aidan McAnespie got to to with today's blog item? Is it an attempt to derail and divert attention away from the latest Vatican revelation?

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    1. Pat allows people to express their views, just as you have done so.
      I didn't hear the radio programme on this dark chapter in our history.
      It's better than the long last interaction between Magna 1, 2 and 3.

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    2. Yes and it worked. Must be McAreavey supporters behind it.

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    3. Dear 12:05 All life is interconnected. One faith, one Lord, one baptism, one God and Father of us all who is in all.

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    4. Yes it worked. The discussion switched inexplicably from a Vatican sex scandal to a State killing. Well done to the McAreavey supporters. The childhood victims can make their own arrangements.

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  10. What a farce that this mucky Mgr had the cheek to judge marriage cases.

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  11. Pat, @11.27- where you an elected representative?
    I thought clergymen couldn't seek elected office?

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    1. Pat was an Independent member of Larne Borough Council. He was already estranged from Down & Connor at that point. For a priest to be elected in Loyal Larne is a remarkable achievement.

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  12. Pat can you tell us more on Ronan Sheehan Cork and Ross??

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    1. @1414 Grow up!

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    2. Pick and choose +Pat

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  13. I seem to remember the fake Magna Carta expressed some dissatisfaction with his computing equipment recently. I'm sure now the police have finished with it, the Monsignor would make him an offer he can't refuse for one heavily used and forensically cleaned up laptop.

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    1. 14.28: You are deranged. Your effort at humour is abysmal. You belong to the rubbish bin! Total rubbish.

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    2. 17:18 I think you've replied to the wrong comment. I fail to see how an attempt to help a fellow human being in need could be interpreted as humor.

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    3. 17.35.....Perhaps, but I was referring to you and your commentary in general....bit tedious. Easy to get confused who the Real Magna is ....we have too many Maggies on this blog....Hyacinth might be preferable!!!

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    4. The fake Magna's equipment disappointed me and I'm not even that picky.

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    5. Oh I so agree, the fake Magna Carta's commentary is dreary beyond belief, my dear. Especially when he's been at the Emva Cream.

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  14. Looking at that photo I've counted 23 judges. Why aren't these parish dodgers on the mission, with their places taken by lay Canon lawyers, preferably married ones, who surely would be better placed to judge on marital cases.

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    1. Eminently appropriate question and suggestion.
      MMM

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  15. How many clerics in Ireland are judging matrimonial cases with mucky secrets like the Monsignor?

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    1. How dare you. Leave these holy, ontologically transformed men of God alone. God himself gives them the authority to judge others' bedroom behaviour and this right mustn't be sullied by a few bad apples.
      - Clutches pearls -

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    2. A rough guess... all of them.

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  16. Apropos the recent discussion of Confirmations in Dromore, the bishop of Limerick has asked whether the Confirmation age should be raised. In the Anglican church in Ireland Confirmation seems to happen around the 14 year mark, where there's a bit more choice involved in a candidate's decision to be confirmed.

    In the Irish Catholic church, 11 year olds, not seen at Mass since their First Holy Communion, are presented for Confirmation, not to be seen again until the next family funeral or their own wedding. What a farce.

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  17. 15.42 Sean Page is the one and only person who reveals his true identity on his blog and for that, Sean you have my admiration. You are a greater person than me
    You often give a balanced and experienced opinion from your own viewpoint.
    You rarely resort to name calling or nasty comments.
    I see you are the Father of the Blog.

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    1. 17.06 I am not greater than anyone but I thank you for your kind words.

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    2. Sean, I think this person who harasses you is a a single individual. I'd ignore him or her. People move between churches all the time.

      I have switched from the Catholic church to the Presbyterian church, joining a congregation in county Down, mostly because of Pope Francis.

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    3. 22.04 I wondered if changing churches might be more difficult in n Ireland because of history. The "harasser" uses telltale phrases that indicate it may be the same person but their head is their concern Life is too short. Thank you for your words and all the best for the future

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    4. Rubbish! @ 22.04
      You may have defected to the Presbyterian Church. That is your own affair. But don't go pretending to blame it "mostly because of Pope Francis"
      If anyone believes that, they will believe anything (unless you are some naive fool who can't think for himself)

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    5. I'm the "defector" and I'm telling the truth when I say that I left mostly because of Pope Francis.

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    6. A very twisted perspective... Don't you even realise that even yet? You are the one who takes responsibility for your own actions.
      Stop blaming the Pope.

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    7. So I'm not allowed to say that Francis was the deciding factor in my switch to the Presbyterians? I'm sure that equally there are Presbyterians who have converted to Catholicism because of him.

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    8. Good riddance.

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  18. 16.34: For once I agree with Magna: Over the past 25 years many priests have requested the raising of age for confirmation. The present experience is demoralising for priests who spend a great deal of time helping prepare for the sacraments of First Communion, Confession and Confirmation only to realise that these moments are now mostly rites of passage, moments to gather for celebrations and parties. For some families these are special, religious moments, for most simply the traditions of Catholicism, to which they have little commitment. My approach is to seize the opportunity through parish programmes and the celebration of the Sacraments to "evangelise" as positively as possible. Parents have in many respects abandoned all promises to "share their faith" by word and deed! However, there is little point in doing solo runs of complaining or judgment. That's counterproductive. I do my best in the challenge, knowing that my efforts, once caringly carried out can make a difference. One thing is clear to me - the challenge is enormous and our Bishops need to LISTEN, OBSERVE and ACT more imaginatively - and urgently.

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    1. I remember a gifted soul once saying that, for now - in this particular time in the life of parishes - it is enough that children present themselves for the reception of the sacraments.

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    2. 'For once I agree with Magna' 17.16. I'm beginning to think that the more refined and finnessed Magna writes, the more effective he becomes!

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    3. An excellent analysis and suggestion.
      MMM

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  19. https://www.clogherdiocese.ie/cinews/?ID=140084

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  20. I was in Belfast today with 1,000's of other people who call for truth and justice over the murder and killing of some many innocent people.
    It was a powerful witness to see Catholic and Protestant, Unionist and Nationalist joining together.

    United with Stand.

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  21. We’re running out of denunciatory language with which to describe these increasingly unbelievable scandals.

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  22. Why will the canonical trial not be held in public? It would signal the clear intent by church authorities to root out problems and allow people to see what those same authorities are capable of doing for the public good.

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  23. We all know that the abuse of any child be it by Clergy or lay people is wrong. Can I ask you a question however. I read a book you wrote some time back, I cant remember the name of it, but it is the one where you talk about the sex that was happening at St. John's College in Waterford when you were there and how you told that there was at least one priest going around with nothing on under his cassock. In the same book you said that you have shared a bed with young men after you were ordained. If what other clery are and were doing is or was wrong, is what you done also wrong in your opinion. I am expecting this to be deleted or maybe never see the light of day, but maybe I will be proved wrong.

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  24. 22.31: The obsession with Pat's sexual explorations and of others is pornographic. I think it's bizarre.

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  25. Francis' mandate was to clean up the Vatican. The chief internal auditor resigned, Pell was appointed to deal with the financial corruption but was recalled to Australia to answer decades old, but suspiciously recently laid, charges. So no-one is now sorting the corruption out. Francis owes his position to some very unsavoury characters such as Daneels the pervert protector who was in disgrace under Benedict but stood on the loggia with Francis immediately following the election. Francis owes so many dodgy characters so much that he is totally hamstrung. He said that he had the determination and humility to clean up the Vatican, anyone who claims humility, lacks it by definition and any determination that he had has evaporated with the realisation that the bad guys frightened off his predecessor and will do the same to him in an instant if he doesn't play ball. His only friends are the secular press and the perverts and thieves in the Vatican and elsewhere in the Church, he can do nothing about the filth, the filthy wanted Benedict out and him in and he knows now, if he ever doubted it, that he had better remember who he owes. Lie down with the pigs and you get covered in sh*t. And now it's happening.

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    1. Sean Brady probably voted for Bergolio. That would figure.

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  26. You will never know how Brady voted. He’s sworn to secrecy. He likes that sort of thing!

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  27. 01:08 disgusting late-night deranged meanderings fuelled by God knows what.

    Humility is first of all about truth. So that premise is easily dispatched.

    Francis’ mandate is much wider and greater than what you claim. The Holy Spirit is his mentor.

    Your vitriol has persuaded no one.

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  28. The devil is his mentor. What pope has used No.2 imagery?

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