Tuesday, 10 April 2018

CATHOLIC CHURCH'S OWN BREXIT





FROM: GALLUP
POLITICS
APRIL 9, 2018
USA Catholics' Church Attendance Resumes Downward Slide
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Fewer than four in 10 Catholics attend church in any given week
  • Catholic attendance is down six percentage points over the past decade
  • Protestant attendance steady, but fewer Americans now identify as Protestants
WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Weekly church attendance has declined among U.S. Catholics in the past decade, while it has remained steady among Protestants.
From 2014 to 2017, an average of 39% of Catholics reported attending church in the past seven days. This is down from an average of 45% from 2005 to 2008 and represents a steep decline from 75% in 1955.
By contrast, the 45% of Protestants who reported attending church weekly from 2014 to 2017 is essentially unchanged from a decade ago and is largely consistent with the long-term trend.
As Gallup first reported in 2009, the steepest decline in church attendance among U.S. Catholics occurred between the 1950s and 1970s, when the percentage saying they had attended church in the past seven days fell by more than 20 percentage points. It then fell an average of four points per decade through the mid-1990s before stabilizing in the mid-2000s. Since then, the downward trend has resumed, with the percentage attending in the past week falling another six points in the past decade.
This analysis is based on multiple Gallup surveys conducted near the middle of each decade from the 1950s through the present. The data for each period provide sufficient sample sizes to examine church attendance among Protestants and Catholics, the two largest religious groups in the country, as well as the patterns by age within those groups. The sample sizes are not sufficient to allow for analysis of specific Protestant denominations or non-Christian religions.
Less Than Half of Older Catholics Are Now Weekly Churchgoers
In 1955, practicing Catholics of all age groups largely complied with their faith's weekly mass obligation. At that time, roughly three in four Catholics, regardless of their age, said they had attended church in the past week. This began to change in the 1960s, however, as young Catholics became increasingly less likely to attend. The decline accelerated through the 1970s and has since continued at a slower pace. (See tables at the end of this article for all trend figures.)
Meanwhile, since 1955, there has also been a slow but steady decline in regular church attendance among older Catholics. This includes declines of 10 points or more in just the past decade among Catholics aged 50 and older, leading to the current situation where no more than 49% of Catholics in any age category report attending church in the past week.
To maintain consistency with earlier Gallup polling when the sample population was age 21 and older, this analysis defines the youngest age group as those aged 21 to 29 rather than the 18- to 29-year age range typically examined in modern polling.
Attendance Holding Up Among Protestants of All Ages
U.S. Protestants' church attendance was not nearly as high as Catholics' in the 1950s -- but it has not decreased over time. Protestants' church attendance dipped in the 1960s and 1970s among those aged 21 to 29, but it has since rebounded. Among those aged 60 and older, weekly attendance has grown by eight points since the 1950s. (See tables at the end of this article for all trend figures.)
Currently, the rate of weekly church attendance among Protestants and Catholics is similar at most age levels. One exception is among those aged 21 to 29, with Protestants (36%) more likely than Catholics (25%) to say they have attended in the past seven days.
Protestants' Pie Is Shrinking Faster Than Catholics'
While attracting parishioners to weekly services is vital to the maintenance of the Catholic Church and Protestant denominations alike, so too is maintaining a large base of Americans identifying with each faith group.
Although the rate at which Protestants attend church has held firm over the past six decades, the percentage of Americans identifying as Protestant has declined sharply, from 71% in 1955 to 47% in the mid-2010s. Since 1999, Gallup's definition of Protestants has included those using the generic term "Christian" as well as those calling themselves Protestant or naming a specific Protestant faith.
By contrast, while the Catholic Church has suffered declining attendance in the U.S., the overall percentage of Catholics has held fairly steady -- largely because of the growth of the U.S. Hispanic population. Twenty-two percent of U.S. adults today identify as Catholic, compared with 24% in 1955.
A troubling sign for both religions is that younger adults, particularly those aged 21 to 29, are less likely than older adults to identify as either Protestant or Catholic. This is partly because more young people identify as "other" or with other non-Christian religions, but mostly because of the large proportion -- 33% -- identifying with no religion.
U.S. Adults' Religious Affiliation, 1955 vs. 2014-2017
Protestant^
Catholic
Other
None/Undesignated
%
%
%
%
U.S. total
2014-2017
47
22
11
20
1955
71
24
4
1
Age: 21-29
2014-2017
33
19
14
33
1955
66
29
4
1
Age: 30-39
2014-2017
40
20
11
28
1955
68
27
4
1
Age: 40-49
2014-2017
44
25
13
18
1955
69
25
5
1
Age: 50-59
2014-2017
53
23
7
17
1955
75
19
4
2
Age: 60+
2014-2017
55
23
9
12
1955
78
16
4
2
^Protestants for 2014-2017 are defined as Protestants + Christians (nonspecific)
GALLUP
Although the percentages saying they have attended church in the past seven days are relatively low, it should be noted that majorities of self-identified Protestants and Catholics of most ages are still active churchgoers. This is seen in responses to a separate question in which majorities say they attend once a month, nearly weekly or weekly. The only exception is Catholics aged 21 to 29; the majority of these say they seldom or never attend.
Self-Reported Frequency of Church Attendance, by Age
21-29
30-39
40-49
50-59
60+
%
%
%
%
%
Protestants
Once a week
25
27
32
29
36
Almost every week
16
22
15
16
17
Once a month
14
17
18
16
11
Seldom
35
30
26
29
25
Never
11
4
9
9
10
Catholics
Once a week
12
34
24
20
39
Almost every week
7
13
13
13
10
Once a month
25
16
20
19
18
Seldom
44
30
33
34
23
Never
11
8
8
14
8
Note: Based on combined 2014-2017 data; Protestants defined as Protestants + Christians (nonspecific)
GALLUP
Bottom Line
After stabilizing in the mid-2000s, weekly church attendance among U.S. Catholics has resumed its downward trajectory over the past decade. In particular, older Catholics have become less likely to report attending church in the past seven days -- so that now, for the first time, a majority of Catholics in no generational group attend weekly. Further, given that young Catholics are even less devout, it appears the decline in church attendance will only continue. One advantage the Catholic Church has is that the overall proportion of Americans identifying as Catholic is holding fairly steady. However, that too may not last given the dwindling Catholic percentage among younger generations.
Protestant church seats may also be less full, but for a different reason. Although weekly attendance among Protestants has been stable, the proportion of adults identifying as Protestants has shrunk considerably over the past half-century. And that trend will continue as older Americans are replaced by a far less Protestant-identifying younger generation.

All of this comes amid a broader trend of more Americans opting out of formal religion or being raised without it altogether. In 2016, Gallup found one in five Americans professing no religious identity, up from as little as 2% just over 60 years ago.



PAT:

The fact that church attendance by Catholics is on the decline in the Western World is an undeniable fact as is the fact that the decline is continuing.

Apart from the fact that the West is becoming more secular is certainly a contributing factor.

But I think that the decline has also been caused by the drip drip scandals that come out of the Catholic Church on an almost daily basis.

People who would never have thought of leaving the Church are now leaving it because of clerical sex abuse, the homosexualization of the priesthood and other horrors like the Tuam Baby story.

In the past few weeks, we saw very devoted Catholic in rural County Down in Northern Ireland infuriated by the handling of sexual abuse in the Diocese of Dromore - requiring the resignation of Bishop McAreavey.

In Ireland, the Maynooth Gay Scandal has played it's part too - as has the cases of priests exposing their nakedness on apps like GRINDR.

Many Catholics think that this decline is a 100% bad thing.

But I think that it is not all bad and in some strange way, God may be cleansing the Catholic Church of much corruption.

In the future we will have, hopefully, a smaller but a purer church.

Those who go on about RC membership being at 1.2 billion will soon have to revise their figures.

And when it comes to numbers - remember that Facebook has twice as many members as the Church of Rome.


82 comments:

  1. The church and by that I mean the clergy have to take their share of the blame why people don't go to mass. I know of priests for example who love the sound of their own voices and their sermons are nearly as long lf not longer than the whole of the rest of the mass. I live in the diocese of Waterford and lismore and know of one parish priest who has two churches in his care. In the two churches between them he has three masses and I would say between the three masses because he goes on and on he has on average about a dozen people attending each mass. I know of another parish priest who happens to be in the next parish who gets his sermons of the internet written by an African priest. The Irish priest in his sermon will only make changes to what the African priest has to say if a place or name in Africa is mentioned. The Irish priest will change it to an Irish name or place. Priests have to live in the modern age and do as their parishioners want to see them doing.

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  2. It's a pity you chose Williams's book to illustrate this - in strong contrast to Gallup's cool-headed statistics his wild conspiracy theories make some of Magna Carla's more hysterical comments here look almost sensible.

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    1. Yes, so much to say; so little time to say it.😆

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    2. And the other way round in your case.

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  3. The abuse issue is sad and real but I don't think it is the real reason people are leaving church. Abuse happens in all areas of society. I think why people leave is they are not experiencing the presence of God and can't see the point of staying. People in Jesus time had religion but no God experience for many. I believe it's the same scenario again again.

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    1. The fact of the matter is that for many people(but not all) if there is no impetus and understanding that something is obligatory and expected, then they don't have enough push and backbone to continue to do the right thing voluntarily . On the first very wet or cold Sunday morning, they will be happy to not bother to make the effort . Then staying away from church, becomes their norm. It is often more of a lethargy about going than any complaints about the Church itself. Also, over the years(like for example, illegitimacy) missing Mass has gradually lost its stigma in society. Years ago people would have been ashamed if their neighbours knew they had missed a few Sundays. Now people open their garden gate on Sunday morning and quite happily pack their golf clubs - - or whatever --into the boot and not a thought of Mass enters their head. The world has changed hugely and Sunday morning workplaces expect their employees to be in as usual. In the meantime, the Church itself gets the full blame because of the well known problems but it's actually a much more complex change in society all over.

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    2. As I said on another blog, the fear has gone, largely through the provision of universal education.

      Christianity (and Roman Catholicism is no exception) relied heavily on the fear factor for cohesion in different groups. Congregants were running away from Hell, as it were, more than running towards Heaven.

      The churches have never really let God do the talking.

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    3. A number of lines that may be scrolled past at a single glance. That's the way to do it.

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    4. 11:07, oh, but I'm certain you couldn't resist taking at least a peek.😆

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  4. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again. I have long since stopped attending an institutional church. In my case it so happened to be the Catholic Church.
    I discovered that I could and subsequently have developed a close relationship with God. We chat regularly and he/she sustains me through good times and bad and there have been plenty of both.
    Without being too critical what I have developed in a spiritual sense far outstrips anything that I was force fed in childhood by an organisation ( and the Catholic Church isn’t alone in this) who’s primary interest was wealth and asset accumulation nicely disguised with a cloak of religion.
    I pray daily for the knowledge of gods will for me. And do you know what? It works real fine and what’s more a side effect is I’m always much more in pocket!

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    1. Why not part with what you are saving to help the poor, or are they too off your agenda?

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    2. Good point. But FYI I give generously to good causes. Part of a spiritual way of life is following the golden rule “ do unto others as you would wish done to you”
      They are very much on my agenda. Furthermore, I give more than my money. I give my time!

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    3. 9.47 SECULAR organisations also serve the poor. The church does not have a monopoly. I have a soft spot for Aid to the Church in Need. I don't attend church even though I was a parish volunteer for 26 years and worked in a retreat centre for 15 years. The church is going through a seismic shift partly due changes in society. I don't think it ever recovered from Humanae Vitae. Add on the scandals and that very expensive dreadful change to the mass and a lot of people are paddling their own canoes.

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    4. 09:47, now, now, Father.😆 Just because all that cash is no longer going into your deep pocket is no cause for a mini-tantrum.😂

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    5. 9.38 Can't do the right thing voluntary? Of course they can if the motivation is right fuelled by the Grace of God. I did eventually. I'm still not perfect....

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  5. Since when has been a member of Facebook being something to aspire to?! Its numbers are falling rapidly because there are now many more such apps competing with it. That's how the public operate.. We now use WhatsApp and Snapchat or newer ones.. The analogy is ridiculous in the first place .

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  6. I go to Mass for the fun ! I especially go to a traditionalist church to watch all the young old foggies on the altar, who think they still live in 1850s, doffing their birettas and bobbing up and down with their backs to the people and muttering a way as much as they can in Latin. Also, to watch all the odd balls that are attracted to that church. What a hoot ! It's preferable to the other church where they think they are so hip and cool, but are just embarrassingly stupid and can't do anything without making a joke or giving a little ditty. It's all about the priest and how funny and chirpy he is, rather than about the Lord.

    I certainly don't go to church any more out of obligation. I got over that a long time ago. And frankly, I am beginning to find the RC take on most things just idiotic, and at the best a little twee and unrealistic. Some of the stupidities we are expected to believe !

    I probably will have stopped going to church by the time I die, and am already thinking about how I would like to shuffle off this earth, and whether I want all the nonsense of a requiem mass. Perhaps just to be put in to the ground simply with no fuss would be better. If people want to say some private prayers for me, fine, but I'm not sure I want some idiot priest bumbling through a funeral mass trying to say nice things about someone he hasn't a clue about.

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    1. A Requiem Mass is not "nonsense"
      (Ask God's forgiveness for that slip.) @ 11.10
      Think about what you just said and about how your salvation was achieved.. By Whom and how..

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    2. 12:27, the opportunity for his or her salvation was won by Jesus, not by the Roman Catholic Church, through that one and only Mass, ALREADY OFFERED FOR ALL TIME, at the Last Supper, in anticipation of Jesus' passion, death, and ressurrection.😆

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    3. Well, if you still believe in the mechanistic theology of salvation, and the literal interpretation of it and of what God is and what Heaven is, then I suppose I should be asking God's forgiveness. But, the truth is we have constructed a framework which we believe we can understand, hyping it up to be God's construction. In reality, it will be nothing like that, and God will not be as we think we imagine him. I accept that if you want a structure to underpin your existence and your afterlife, then you will use concepts, ideas and language which you can understand. But, we are so limiting ourselves in doing that and doing a disservice to what could possibly happen - if anything. Let's wait and see. Hopefully, God will surprise us, and our timid little imaginings will be overtaken by God. But, please don't expect me to limit myself to the creation of the Roman Catholic Church, whose great interest has always been in bolstering and maintaining its own power and prestige, usually by scaring us and making us fearful - as you have subliminally threatened by telling me to ask God's forgiveness. For what ? I am not in the slightest bit afraid of God, or of what is going to happen, or not happen. I don't believe in Heaven as the Church describes it, or Hell for that matter either. It is all made up tosh ! And if you had any brains you wouldn't believe it either. Let your faith take you to wider and more adventurous thoughts.

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    4. 11.10: Don't make such a fool of yourself. Act maturely and normally. Still, if you collapsed at any of the masses you attend for fun, I'm certain you wouldn't refuse an anointing and prayer from the priest! You should carry a card saying "no prayers, no blessings for me on my death - "just burn my body and scatter the ashes on a heap of dung!" - That way you might help the roses grow! Otherwise, stop being an idiot....

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    5. There's the challenge of the century. Finding something nice to say about 11:10 at his or her funeral.

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    6. Oh, dear ! I have upset you, haven't I ? Just because I ask some awkward questions, and challenge your own view. I think I'm putting forward quite an alternative view. You may not like it, but don't descend in to insulting me just because it differs from yours. You are not far away from the religious fanatics who go beyond name calling to killing people, just because they believe something different. Remember, in Ireland certainly, that kind of reaction was put to bed 20 years ago with the Good Friday Agreement. But, listening to you, it would appear that you can't engage in reasonable discussion, and just get all angry and threatening. Are you a priest ? I bet you are. You are not able to contemplate anything other than the complete rubbish you were fed in seminary. Have you done any theology since the day you left seminary ? I don't think so judging by your reaction. Perhaps a sabbatical might be in order for a bit of aggiornamento ? And the worse thing is, you are probably feeding all this stuff from the pulpit to your people. They in all likelihood are far more advanced in their theological thinking than are you. Poor people, having to listen to you week in and week out. To get back to the original subject of this blog, I bet they are voting with their feet. Oh, this is boring ! All you will do is come back with some nasty comment about me being an idiot or worse. I give up !

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    7. 18.49: You prove the point I was making. Your comnent is so over the top, outlandishly exaggerated and rather long in words but no meaningful content. Your efforts at seeming intelligent are fantastical. And no, I'm not a priest but I respect the work they do. And yes, I have studied theology, philosophy and history. I am proud if my faith, my Catholicism and delighted to contribute meaningfully to my parish community. The tone of your comment displays arrogance but it's so all over the place, I'd give you 1 out of 10 for effort.

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    8. Close the door on the way out, Granny! Did you manage to pass on the Faith to your children and grandchildren?

      No? I thought not.

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    9. 19:36, his or her comment isn't 'so all over the place', don't y' know? And Magna rarely offers praise.😆

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    10. Poster at 18.49: Your unnecessary piece of verbiage meanders through all kinds of issues and is utterly bizarre. Who hurt you today? Who smacked you in the face? I think you could rewrite your piece in a more succinct way but without the insults and intolerance. Who ruffled your precious feathers to warrant your demented rant? Get a life....

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    11. 19:49, and did you manage to pass on your bad temper to YOUR children and grandchildren? Yes? Thought so.😆

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    12. 18.49 Sad when Mass becomes a soap opera

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  7. The 1.2 billion figure contradicts the teaching that not all Catholics are in real union with the Catholic Church. Schism is a more complicated idea than just forming a new Church organisation. The figure really comes from censuses. It is quoted by people who do not respect the right of a person raised Catholic not to identify as Catholic and accepts deluded people who imagine they are Catholic but whose faith is anything but Catholic. It is quoted by people who want to make atheists or Mormons or whatever feel like they are nothing in comparison to the mighty Catholic Church. Islam is a faith based religion which means only Allah knows who the true believers or true Muslims are (as opposed to pretenders) so spiritually speaking or religiously speaking Islam is not really as big as it appears.

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  8. I find it hard to respect people who think they can drop the Church over scandals etc. What about truth? The only justification for dropping out is that you know or are reasonably persuaded the religion is not really authorised to teach by God.

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  9. A smaller more pure Church is a good thing. Many people who attend mass are hypocrites. People who go to mass for the sake of going will drop off and only committed Christians will attend mass.

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    1. I imagine you don't see the irony in your diagnosis, 12.12.

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  10. @ 11.45
    I really agree with you that during times of scandal and difficulty, the Church needs people who don't throw up their hands and let go of the reins completely. That is not the reaction and behaviour of a person who was attending out of sincere conviction in the first place. It is very much how I, myself see things too.
    It is exactly like being a trusted member of any family... You hang on in there and don't turn your back and abandon at the moment when you are vitally needed.
    I sometimes think Christ will have a special reward for those who stayed and "fought the good fight" in spite of scandals, slander, ridicule, discouragement--you name it. .
    May we be numbered among them!

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    1. But what do you do about all of the known evil, 12:23? Offer it up? Because you seem to me to be someone who would simply shrug his shoulders and say something like 'ah, sure we're all sinners; we all make mistakes'.

      If you are as you seem, then you are a major part of the moral rot in the Church.

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    2. 12:23 - Jesus would not agree that you stay and fight the good fight. His whole ministry is based on kicking against the pricks. He didn’t stay. He called out the rot. He teaches us that there is another way.

      Had Jesus done what you suggest he wouldn’t be remembered as he is today.

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    3. Magna at 14.58: You're an expert at pointing out in a horrendously abusive way the faults of others. Your theological ramblings are useless and all transcribed from books! You suggest that poster 12.23 is part of the "moral rot" in the Church just because he expresses a balanced, rational and chsllenging comment. I cobsider your osyche to be the epitomy of what "moral rot" truly means - indecency, drunkenness, bigotry, inciter of hatred, no spiritual kindness, mercy or empathy, arrogant! Need I go on defining "moral rot". Ever since your humiliating rejection from seminary the rot has worsened in you. Soon, you will crumble. Alone.

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    4. 'Soon you will crumble. Alone.' That last word, 19:23, separated from the sentence in which it is syntactically involved...oh, the sense of melodrama it suggests. The pathos it conveys.

      You've taken creative-writing classes, haven't you?😆

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    5. You've taken a few tonight, haven't you?��

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  11. I’d love a fish chips and mushy peas now.

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    Replies
    1. I had a lovely bit of bacon and cabbage

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    2. I've just ordered five chicken breast bites for £2.60 in Wetherspoons in Carrickfergus. Lovely view of the castle.

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    3. Send out forms chips.. It's the only way

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    4. Ah you’s are making me mouth water. I’m waiting for the vinnies to bring me down me bag. Love the tins of spam.

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    5. You're so easily pleased. Most commentators on this blog should prefer a BBC, including Sr Mary.

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  12. Pat, I’m in an awful state altogether. Timmy is after lighting a padre pio candle and setting mammy’s good curtains on fire.

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    Replies
    1. Ah sure go up and knock on the PP’s door and ask for a few bob. You’ll pick up a nice pair of nets in Frawleys for a tenner.

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    2. A lovely man is Timmy. salt of the earth

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    3. 17:04, don’t be daft! Have you learned nothing on this blog. One must make an appointment to see a priest and even then you’re not guaranteed it’s the PP you are meeting as priests tend to forget who they are. Remember, whoever you meet must be referred to as father. Know your place! You’ll always be the little peasant in front of reverend father.

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    4. 19.43: A rather infantile response: a jeering, ridiculing tone. I open my door frequently to strangers who are looking for some money. I always give something along with food vouchers I buy. Just doing the work of a priest...as many, many priests do. What's your problem?

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    5. 20:04 If you're a RC priest visiting this blog, then you have issues.

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    6. @20:04. Not all heroes wear capes….do your hands ever get sore from slapping yourself on the back so much father?

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    7. 21.09: No, my hands don't get sore, ever, except when I weed my garden and do so for others less mobile than me! Sorry to disappoint you. Your earlier comment is both silly and infantile. Not interested in playing childish games with an idiot. Now, I must yet again answer the doorbell and practice my compassion....Take a deep breath..God loves a cheerful giver..

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    8. 20.43: Tell us your rationale for saying that if poster 20.04 is a priest on this blog, he has a problem! A big statement! Think the problem is with you.

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    9. I believe 19:43 was being sarcastic in relation to the videos posted by James recently.

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    10. the padre has so much time on his hands he comes on here to score a point with an anonymous contributor. good for you father, good for you.

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    11. 20:43, issues? Oh, we all have those; they're ten a penny, fashionable, too. Mine are...😶

      Oh, I'm off down the pub to think about that one.😆

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  13. +Pat have you had any more scoops from John King, the Shantallow super-sleuth?

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  14. Magna, stop being abusive to that poster! You are at your old game, jumping to conclusions .

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    1. Please, 18:13, do try to be precise. Which poster? Cos, ordinarily, I'm abusive to them all. (I don't want to discriminate.😆)

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  15. I'm really confused. Plenty of people on this blog claim that Francis is extremely popular and the best Pope ever. Why then is the decline accelerating under this Pontificate, when it had stabalised under JPII and Benedict?

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    1. Didn't you read today's blog? According to Gallup, the steepest decline in Church attendance among US Catholics occurred from 1950s to - 1970s. What has Pope Francis to do with this?

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    2. Quite right. It's Modernism's fault and the decline got a turbo boost from Vatican II. I'd suggest that the decline was slow in the 1950s and then took off in the 1960s and 1970s.

      But the question remains why the decline continues under the allegedly popular Francis, having stabalised prior to him getting the See?

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    3. 19:58, modernism my a**e! The answer is simplicity itself: the churches never really sold Jesus to their congregations, but FEAR of Jesus as the implaccable judge on Judgement Day.

      People have outgrown, and are continuing to outgrow, that fear.

      JPII and Nazi Benedict were cut from the same fearmongering cloth, so decline may have stabilised, for a time. But Francis is friendlier, warmer, more human, as it were.

      The fatheaded, fossilized old Pole, and the Teutonic (Seig Heil!) bureaucrat, were Francis personal antonyms, inspiring more dread than devotion. These qualities are not of God, proving that neither of these wasters knew the first thing about the God they each claimed to serve.😆

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    4. Four paragraphs to skip. I wont count the lines.

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    5. 18:34 and 19:58 Show us the statistics. And learn to spell.

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    6. Here are some statistics for you, 23:59, from Georgetown University. Enjoy!

      https://cara.georgetown.edu/frequently-requested-church-statistics/

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  16. What is the new incumbent in Dublins Pro Cathedral up to ? while predecessor was a flamer he is very much a damp squib. I hear he hasn't even moved into the Parochial House yet as he wants it exorcised.

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    Replies
    1. Kieran is only massive x

      He’s a head of hair like a rotten coconut.

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    2. I hear the archbishop threw the divine mercy image out of the same cathedral about a month ago. So much for thinking that they need mercy or protection.

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    3. @20:38

      You mean, basically, a disappointment.

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    4. 22.14 I'm not a fan of Kieran but neither am I a fan of that sort of silly personal comment about anyone.

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  17. My three favourite bits of the comments here are
    1. The sadly infrequent comments by Big Lillian about the Dean
    2. The fact there are about five people posting under the same name
    3. The waspish, queeny comments from priests on the defensive when their privileged position in an incredibly corrupt organisation is called out. This makes me laugh without fail.

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    Replies
    1. 21.47: Aren't you easily amused! You don't seem at all intelligent. Supreme gossipy queen I suspect.

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    2. MournemanMichael12 April 2018 at 00:37

      I do like your third point. It's a reality that those defensive comments come most loudly from those with no realisation of their privileged position, one which is fortunately being rapidly eroded away.
      MMM

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    3. @00:37, actually research shows that a defensive reaction is the most common result when someone from outside a group is perceived as attacking a system which provides existential meaning to the individual. This tends to be the reason that people get rather unreasonable when discussing politics and religion - these are both systems which are often tied up with how an individual perceived the meaning of their lives. I think therefore it’s less about a privileged position and more about the perception of an attack on a system from which the individual derives existential meaning. (Cf. Van Tongeren, D. R., Green, J. D., Hulsey, T. L., Legare, C. H., Bromley, D. G., & Houtman, A. M. (2014). A meaning-based approach to humility: Relationship affirmation reduces worldview defense. Journal of Psychology & Theology, 42(1), 62–69.)

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    4. MournemanMichael12 April 2018 at 18:12

      Good points and well accepted.
      Thanks.
      MMM

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  18. Do you mean us?

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    Replies
    1. Oi, stop it. I'm Magna Carta, not you!

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    2. I am not 'us'. 'I' is singular. And I am the one and only.

      Why settle for cheap imitations, when you can have me?😆

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