Thursday, 12 April 2018

'I ask forgiveness of all those I have offended,' Pope says in letter to Chilean bishops
Catholic Herald 11.4.2018

Pope Francis has apologized for underestimating the seriousness of the sexual abuse crisis in Chile following a recent investigation into allegations concerning Bishop Juan Barros of Osorno.
The Pope said he made “serious mistakes in the assessment and perception of the situation, especially due to a lack of truthful and balanced information”.
“I ask forgiveness of all those I have offended and I hope to be able to do it personally in the coming weeks,” the Pope said in the letter, which was released by the Vatican. Several survivors apparently have been invited to the Vatican to meet the Pope.


KARADIMA

Abuse victims alleged that Bishop Barros – then a priest – had witnessed their abuse by his mentor, Fr Fernando Karadima. In 2011, Fr Karadima was sentenced to a life of prayer and penance by the Vatican after he was found guilty of sexually abusing boys. Fr Karadima denied the charges. He was not prosecuted civilly because the statute of limitations had run out.
Protesters and victims said Bishop Barros is guilty of protecting Fr Karadima and was physically present while some of the abuse was going on.
During his visit to Chile in January, Pope Francis asked forgiveness for the sexual abuse committed by some priests in Chile.
“I feel bound to express my pain and shame at the irreparable damage caused to children by some of the ministers of the Church,” he said.
However, speaking to reporters, he pledged his support for Bishop Barros and said: “The day they bring me proof against Bishop Barros, I will speak. There is not one piece of evidence against him. It is calumny.”


BARROS

He later apologised to the victims and admitted that his choice of words wounded many.
A short time later, the Vatican announced that Pope Francis was sending a trusted investigator to Chile to listen to people with information about Bishop Barros.
The investigator, Archbishop Charles Scicluna of Malta, is president of a board of review within the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith. The board handles appeals filed by clergy accused of abuse or other serious crimes. The archbishop also had 10 years of experience as the Vatican’s chief prosecutor of clerical sex abuse cases at the doctrinal congregation.
Pope Francis said Archbishop Scicluna and his aide, Fr Jordi Bertomeu Farnos, heard the testimony of 64 people and presented him with more than 2,300 pages of documentation. Not all of the witnesses spoke about Fr Karadima and Bishop Barros; several of them gave testimony about abuse alleged to have occurred at a Marist Brothers’ school.
After a “careful reading” of the testimonies, the Pope said, “I believe I can affirm that all the testimonies collected speak in a brutal way, without additives or sweeteners, of many crucified lives and, I confess, it has caused me pain and shame.”
The Pope said he was convening a meeting in Rome with the 34 Chilean bishops to discuss the findings of the investigations and his own conclusions “without prejudices nor preconceived ideas, with the single objective of making the truth shine in our lives”.
Pope Francis said he wanted to meet the bishops to discern immediate and long-term steps to “re-establish ecclesial communion in Chile in order to repair the scandal as much as possible and re-establish justice”.
Archbishop Scicluna and Fr Bertomeu, the Pope said, had been overwhelmed by the “maturity, respect and kindness” of the victims who testified.
“As pastors,” the Pope told the bishops, “we must express the same feeling and cordial gratitude to those who, with honesty [and] courage” requested to meet with the envoys and “showed them the wounds of their soul”.
Following the release of Pope Francis’s letter, Bishop Santiago Silva Retamales, president of the bishops’ conference and head of the military ordinariate, said the bishops of Chile would travel to the Vatican in the third week of May.
The bishops, he said, shared in the Pope’s pain.
“We have not done enough,” he said in a statement. “Our commitment is that this does not happen again.


PAT

So, the pope admits he was wrong about clerical sexual abuse in Chile?

So much for Papal Infallibility.

It was quite clear to the rest of us that there was a major sexual abuse problem in Chile - as there is and has been in every country around the world.

In fact, one of the big scandals yet to come will the amount of sexual abuse perpetrated by Catholic missionary priests - including Irish missionaries - in places like Africa and South America. I believe that these missionaries will have abused countless thousands of people in Africa and South America.

One of the main reasons that this abuse has not yet come to light is the primitive media situations in these countries.

As this media situation develops this juggernaut scandal will hurtle down the Roman Catholic highway.

It is also now very clear that the Bishop of Rome and his staff have played a major covering up role in sexual abuse around the RC world.


The top is about to come off the Chile sexual abuse box very soon. That will be followed by thousands of reports and information from all over South America and Africa.

It will probably be a greater scandal that the abuse in the West has been.

I once celebrated the wedding of an Irish nurse who had worked with a religious order in Africa for a number of years. There were 17 Irish priests on the mission. The nurse told me that she knew for certain that 16 of them were sexually active with men, women, and others!

The next big wave of Catholic clerical sexual abuse will come out of the so-called "Third World".

While many innocent Irish Catholics were collecting pennies for the "Black Babies" many of those babies / children were being abused.




85 comments:

  1. “So much for Papal infallibility”? What an idiotic and theologically illiterate comment! Papal infallibility does not mean the Pope can’t be wrong.

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    1. Will the papal apology make the news, and if not, why not?

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    2. PB knew that, he just takes every chance (and half chance) to attack the Church. This was an appeal to those who are theologically illiterate.

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  2. So will Barros be prosecuted ?

    Will the pope now need to resign?

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    1. Why should the Pope resign?! Don't be daft.

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    2. McAreavey was made to resign for a similar cover-up. Francis resisted the strong objections of the CDF to Bishop Barros's appointment, accussed victims of calumny and lied in a mid-air press conference when he claimed that no reports had been received. Cardinal O'Malley publicly reminded Francis that he had weeks before handed over personally a nine page letter from victims.

      So Francis is:

      Suffering from memory loss; a liar; or an abuse denier. Or a combination of them. As such he is unfit to be Pope.

      Cue Francis-worshippers.

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    3. As we said to you already, don't be daft!

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    4. Who are "we"? Why did McAreavey resign for less in a diocese unknown outside Ireland but Francis sails on?

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    5. Barros wasn't even mentioned by name in the so-called apology. He's still the bishop of his diocese.

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    6. Why is the BBC not after Francis? They chased Bishop McArevey out of Dromore. Is it that Francis says things that the secular media loves to hear on abortion, contraception, married priests etc so they'll look the other way when he says abuse victims are calumniators?

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    7. Barros is still the bishop.

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    8. 21:30 Your comment is a calumny in itself. Haven’t you heard? Francis has acknowledged his mistake and has begun to act acordingly. He has done more by admitting lacking full knowledge.

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    9. You clearly have another agenda , 21:30. You don’t like Francis. You are entitled not to. But he was elected. And he is the Pope. Have a look at Gaudete et exsultate just published, especially Chapter 5.

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  3. +Pat you know quite well that simple utterances from the Holy Father are not infallible.

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  4. Many years ago we had a collection box at home which we used to put or small change into,especially during Lent. Mammy then changed the cash and sent off a postal order to the mission order for Africa.
    One day, I think it was a Sunday afternoon, mammys cousin came to visit us. She was just back from working with a missionary order in Africa.
    I don’t know the conversation but whatever mammy was told disturbed her. Never again did we have a collection box.
    After my mother died my sister told me that our cousin told mammy about some of the things she witnessed. Priests sexually abusing children.
    Although that was over 60 years ago I still remember it.

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    1. If we withdraw our charitable help then we deprive the innocent while trying to trying to cast a wild shot into the ether hoping that we hit the guilty.

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    2. 13.30 If you willing give money to people who see nothing wrong with sexual abuse, you have guilt by association.

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    3. I give nothing to 3rd World charities now. HM Government gives £14bn in "international aid" annually, paid for by UK taxpayers, despite savage austerity cuts and foodbanks at home.

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    4. Don't be such a skinflint!
      "As long as you gave to these, the least of My brethren, you gave to Me"

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    5. 20:42 Guilt by association is no guilt.

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  5. Chuck. E. Arlaw13 April 2018 at 08:44

    Pat, Once agan you display your monumental ignorance. Papal infallibility is restricted only to matters of faith, and requires the explicit declaration of such by the Pontiff. So your cheap shot "So much for papal infallibility." is just another manifestation (as though we needed further proof) - of your hatred of the church from which you have estranged yourself. It's never too late to seek reconciliation!

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    1. The RC church's day has chuckied!

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    2. Pat what 8.44 said in their last comment is true - It's never too late to seek reconciliation. What you replied is only partly true - one tragic aspect of churchmens' doings is coming home to roost. Stand with Jesus and don't take their sins on yourself and look for reconciliation and what you can do to help as opposed to cover up.

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    3. 8.44 I would find it hard to reconcile with a church that has bullied people into submission.

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    4. Pat at 9.42: Your idiotic comments show your moral, human deficiency. I haven't yet seen - and never will - crowds making their way to Larne. You can crow all you like but The True Catholic Church - maybe a faithful remnant - will be around long after you've met your Saviour. So, don't get yourself in a delightful, sneering mood. I trust the HOLY SPIRIT - & THE PROMISE OF JESUS TO BE WITH US ALWAYS TILL THE END OF TIME...Pat, don't always be putting people down.

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    5. Thanks Pat at 15.30, but you are not asked to reconcile with people who bully. The invite surely is to work positively with Jesus who is trying to work with a failing and corrupt governance in earth, a governance which certainly does include bullies. If you don't bully others and you look to Jesus only when you are bullied, he will show you a way through it.

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  6. Write the plot Pat or will I write it for you. Isn't it admirable to see Pope Francis admit his errors of judgment? Abuse of any kind is awful and must be condemned and justice given to survivors. I hope Pope Francis continues on from his words. I believe he will.

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    1. Admirable that Pope Francis has admitted his 'errors', 08:59? I don't believe there is anything remotely admirable about it. For a start, the letter issued by the Vatican is not specific on these so-called 'errors'. Second, it attempts to deflect blame from Francis, especially to those who, in the letter's words, did not provide him with 'truthful and balanced information'. This is not so much a global 'mea culpa' by the pope as an exercise in damage limitation (making excuses for Francis' wilful conduct) and papal self-promotion.

      Francis WAS handed evidence against Barros back in 2015, PERSONALLY, by Cardinal Sean O'Malley...and did nothing. Or, rather, he did nothing just and positive. What he did do, apart from denying abuse victims an investigation of Barros (which was bad enough), was to accuse them of calumny, a very serious accusation, morally speaking. There is NO mention of this in the Vatican letter.

      I sometimes cannot believe the willingness with which papal devotees who contribute to this blog will jump through intellectual hoops to make excuses for glaring papal sins, excuses that they would not make for anyone else.

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    2. Magna at 11.41, when you write peacefully you often make powerful points. Your post is true to my ears and it portrays a very sad reality. I will still read what Francis says when he comes here and try to put whatever good I can into practice, but my trust is in Jesus.

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    3. I'm afraid Magna that the old adage comes to mind. "What would you expect from a pig but a grunt."

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    4. Oh, but there is also delicious pork, bacon, etc.😆

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    5. 11:41 Three longish looking paragraphs to bypass here / that’s too many.

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  7. The Pope apologises. It is a step in the right direction. As for papal infallibility it does not come into this topic. I sometimes wonder if the Pope can really effect change given the way the church is organised and run. Best of luck to him. Let's hope the Grace of God shines through.

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  8. A question I ask and never seem to get a right answer to is why is sexual impropriety so prominent in church type organisations

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    1. 09.37 People were trained from childhood to trust and respect these people. The betrayal of that trust is heart breaking. I also think people thought that they could only get to heaven if they obeyed these people. I suspect sexual abuse was so rampant that it became normalised They didn't think it was wrong.

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    2. 11.07 Thnk you. Abuse is never normal but I can see how people can be caught in a vicious circle. If priests preached of the evils of sex why were their willies blowing in the breeze

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  9. I know ALL the if' s and buts about papal infallibility.

    The question is "Has Francis a clue about faith and morals".

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    1. Hello Pat. Can I ask why do you ask the question in such a strident manner? I certainly see that it is very relevant indeed to ask about the faith and morality of the Catholic Church and all those who hold office in it. The way you ask the question here though seems, to me at least, to contain an inherent suggestion within it that Francis does NOT have a clue? Can you expand a bit on this, thanks.

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    2. Pat, your arrogance is not an attractive trait and fools no-one. A bigger man would have respect...

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    3. He has more of a “clue” about faith and morals than you do, Pat.

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    4. 11:57, so why did Francis wait so long to take this step? Truth is has been shamed into it by the global Press.

      Had there been no such pressure on Francis, that proud papal knee would not have bent. And if the truth be told again, it only appears bent, since Francis is doing this more in papal self-promotion than anything else.

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    5. P*** off Carta. Sure you’ll never be happy no matter what he does. Neither will Pat Buckley.

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    6. 12:31, on the contrary, I'd be VERY happy with Francis, if only he did the right (rather than expedient) thing.😆

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    7. Carta, go and troll someone else. Not interested.

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    8. 12.20 It is dreadful that the Church has to be policed by the press. Do they have no conscience?Will the offenders be brought to civil justice?
      No !mercy was shown to the victims. Are the rest of us children of a lesser God? Does the Church only protect the clergy?

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    9. If it were not for the press, child abuse would be continuing in the Catholic church on an industrial scale.

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    10. 08:43
      You seem to imply the problem is solved. Inside or outside the church (now probably mostly outside) it’s almost a national pastime.

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  10. Pat,although it is good to see the pope turn around, we know what church apologies are like. What is so sad here is how did a leading churchman over 30 years and after all the history, still have the tragic flaw of standing by a fellow clergyman and accusing victims and others of mortal sin. I'm sorry but no apology gets around that.

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    1. @11.50

      Luckily, what you think doesn't matter...

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    2. 14.33: Magna----- and you are?? You are as anonymously irrelevant as ever, my scummy Magna.

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    3. 13.02 what I think does matter, and that's what people like you don't get. But Jesus gets it. And luck has nothing to do with it.

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  11. Sometimes one has to ask, “How sorry is sorry”?

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    1. I can't help but admire Cardinal Scicluna.

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    2. Carta at 12:21 - never you mind. Now shove orf. :-D

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    3. Carta will now spend all day on this blog sadly until bed time - how sad is that? What a total waste of space.

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    4. 12:32, what? No explanation for your admiration of little Scicluna?

      'Must be love, love, love' Ha ha ha 😅😆

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    5. @13:08, listen “love”. I don’t do trolls. Now run along.

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    6. Well, then 13:05, I'm in excellent (was about to add 'intelligent') company. But a guy can't have everything, now can he?😆

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    7. nothing more, nothing less, love is the best :)

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    8. Jog on there Carta. You’re boring people.

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    9. I can't help but admire Cardinal Bartlett.

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  12. 12.15 Oops!....that should read Archbishop.

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  13. Lady Godiva was a freedom rider,
    She didn't care if the whole world looked,
    Joan of Arc with the Lord to guide her,
    She was a sister who really cooked,
    Isadora was the first bra-burner,
    Ain't ya glad she showed up? (Oh yeah!)
    And when the country was fallin' apart,
    Betsy Ross got it all sewed up.

    (CHORUS):
    (And then there's Pat ),
    And then there's Pat,
    (And then there's Pat),
    And then there's Pat,
    (And then there's Pat),
    And then there's Pat
    (And then there's.....),

    That uncompromisin', enterprisin', anything but tranquilizin',
    Right on Pat!

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  14. So far - at 19.19 only 44 comments of which 13 are from Mags, Pat, Sean Page and Magna Carta(R). I myself have posted 6/7...Not generating much interest Pat in your anti-Pope Francis vendetta? Shame on you. The Christ you supposedly honour might, one day, prompt some decency in you.

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    1. How many comments did your comment attract, 19:23? Lol. Do you worship Francis or Jesus Christ?

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    2. Are you morally blind, 19:23? Francis is no injured innocent in this; he INJURED the innocent.

      What is wrong you people?

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    3. 19.55: - not interested in responses given to my pieces. Obviously you like to be made feel adequate with responses. I worship The God of Jesus - first and foremost and I recognise the authority of Pope Francis as Vicar of Christ on earth. Magna without the "r" - what is wrong with 'you people' - answer: nothing compared to what's wrong with you - psychologically, psychiatrically and spirutually.

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    4. 19.23 I am not anti Pope Francis but I am anti any organisation that thinks it is above the law.

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    5. 21:04 by his or her admission puts the Pope on an equal level to Jesus, so that if Jesus says something the Pope can contradict it even though he's just the vicar and both Vat I & Vat II taught that that popes were custodians of Revelation and not originators of new teaching.

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    6. Utter rot at 22:50. You appear never to have been exposed to anything Francis said or wrote.

      Suggestion: a paragraph from Gaudete et exsultate a day untilit’s finished.

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  15. @ 15.56

    Stick to the day job(if you have one..) Oh dear...

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    Replies
    1. It was a hit in the 1970’s and 80’s from the hot tv show Maude. It’s considered a classic and made golden girl Bea Arthur a household name!

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    2. Ah yes, Maude. I’ve not seen it in years but I remember the tune. It’s very catchy

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    3. 19:24

      this song was written by the great Alan Bergman who won three Academy Awards for Best Original Song and has been inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame. maybe the song wasn't to your taste, or maybe you like putting others down?

      Delete
  16. Have you all forgotten: I give you a new commandment: love one another; you must love one another just as I have loved you.

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  17. 19:24 is likely someone born in the 1980's and spent his teenage years listening to Gregorian chant while the other lads were outside kicking a ball. He dreamed of going to Maynooth but he didn't have the aptitude.He also fails to see the humorous side of this blog. grow up little man.

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  18. @21.24
    Oh dear! - - very, very far off the mark on several different counts! But your reply is giving me and the rest of the chicks in the band a wee laugh over our beers.. So kudos to you, mate!

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  19. It is bigoted how the rugby players are being hounded for their badness and the pope will come to Ireland and get a welcome having done much much worse and provided the sea for abusers to swim in and sacraments to provide a placebo for a condemning conscience. They even have a saviour who banned young girls from divorcing even though those girls were forced into wedlock at 11 or 12 to be abused in marriage. Neat.

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    1. Another calumny, 12:31.
      Francis’ honest acknowledgement of his mistake is unprecedented. If anything it shows how insifious abuse is.

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    2. Someone "forced" into marriage is NEVER lawfully married. You must enter into the contract freely and during the ceremony you will be asked publicly if you "wish to take this man/woman for your lawful wedded wife /husband"

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  20. The commission on abuse set up by Francis has been allowed to quietly disappear following the resignations, in disgust, of several members. PF is strangely selective when it comes to those accused. Cardinal Pell is summarily ejected from the Vatican and sent to Australia who hadn't issued an extradition request, BUT in the case of the Msgr. Capella, jointly accused by US and Canadian authorities of downloading and distributing child porn., they refuse to extradite him to Canada as requested. Barros was his mate and PF did his best to defend him and lied about seeing victim testimony (he had, but said that he hadn't). PF's situation stinks and according to his Bessie mate Maradiaga, the whole abuse matter is all a 'set up' by (guess who) the JEWS! But not in Pell's case because he has the goods on so many cardinals, bishops and priests and their lucre.

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