Sunday, 3 December 2017

"THEY WANT FRANCIS DEAD"!

The “People’s Pope” is not trying to build an inclusive Catholic Church. He’s ruthlessly making it liberal.









There is hardly anyone in the world by now who is unfamiliar with the affable, down-to-earth, conspicuously humble persona projected by Pope Francis. His style of governance, however, is a far cry from this carefully cultivated public image. Influenced by the Peronist ideology of his native Argentina, he rules the Roman Catholic Church with the idiosyncratic passions, and disciplined commitment to an agenda, of a true ideologue. And Amoris Laetitia, Francis’s 260-page, nearly 60,000-word, post-synodal apostolic exhortation on marriage and family, which was released is the clearest example yet.

Francis’s “People’s Pope” persona has always belied an autocratic temperament that is coldly efficient at achieving his aims, if not winning allies to his cause. In his National Geographic profile of the pontiff, formerly known as Jorge Mario Bergoglio, Robert Draper relates that:
[Francis has] an awareness that his every act and syllable will be parsed for symbolic portent. Such prudence is thoroughly in keeping with the Jorge Bergoglio known by his Argentine friends, who scoff at the idea that he is guileless. They describe him as a “chess player,” one whose every day is “perfectly organized,” in which “each and every step has been thought out.” Bergoglio himself told the journalists Francesca Ambrogetti and Sergio Rubin several years ago that he seldom heeded his impulses, since “the first answer that comes to me is usually wrong.”
Robert Mickens, editor in chief of Global Pulse, an online Catholic magazine, described Francis as a “master tactician” who was able to “make a move to outflank various groups and people that continue to oppose many of his initiatives.”
Such cold and calculating determination has been in evidence throughout the process leading up to the publication of Amoris Laetitia. Never in my lifetime as a Catholic has a papal document been more anticipated — or feared — than this follow-up to the two-part Synod of Bishops that originally convened in October 2014. Institutionally, the document’s roots can be traced back even further, at least to the consistory, or meeting of cardinals, in February 2014, at which the octogenarian Cardinal Walter Kasper, bishop emeritus of Rottenburg-Stuttgart, was personally asked by Francis to give the keynote address. It was here that Kasper — once a lightning rod of theological controversy who had already begun to fade into the obscurity of retirement — had new life suddenly breathed into his ecclesiastical career as he was lavished with praise by the unconventional new pope for his “serene theology.

At the core of this theology was a novel conception of mercy that appeared to preclude repentance. While paying lip service to the church’s long-established doctrine on the indissolubility of marriage, Kasper proposed the exploration of new paths to respond to the alleged deep needs of divorced people who have remarried, offering the idea of a period of penance after which they might be re-admitted to the sacraments. This “Kasper Proposal,” as it came to be known, was nothing new in his native Germany, where he had advocated it (and implemented it in practice) for years, but thrust into the spotlight of Rome it became an immediate point of contention for orthodox Catholics. It represented the possibility of an institutional embrace of adultery, as well as permission for those living in grave sin to be re-admitted to Holy Communion — a practice that had been understood previously as sacrilege. Nevertheless, it formed the locus around which both the extraordinary and ordinary synods on marriage and family would trace their orbits in October 2014 and 2015, respectively.

For his part, Kasper — with a strong papal endorsement in hand — continued to pitch the idea as he went on a world tour to promote his book Mercy: The Essence of the Gospel and the Key to Christian Life. Francis, who described Kasper early in his papacy as a “superb theologian,” said that his book “has done me so much good, so much good.” As pressure mounted against the Kasper Proposal from more conservative quarters within the church, the cardinal responded with an appeal to authority: “I agreed with the pope. I spoke twice with him. He showed himself content [with the proposal]. Now, they create this controversy. A cardinal must be close to the pope, by his side. The cardinals are the pope’s cooperators.”

With no correction from the Vatican, Kasper’s testimony stood, in the eyes of many of the faithful, as proof that Francis was an advocate of his position. And as the list of unorthodox prelates invited personally by Francis to the synod grew, so too did the suspicion that the pope was, in fact, entertaining the unthinkable: a blessing for changes in Catholic practice that would fatally erode the very doctrine they purported not to change.

Examples abound that the apparently simple, jovial Francis — who is so keen to refer to himself only as the “bishop of Rome,” and who gives the appearance of a strong sense of collegiality with his brother bishops — has always preferred to wield his authority like a hammer in pursuit of his own agenda. His scathing and wide-ranging rebuke of the Roman Curia, the central government of the church, in his 2014 Christmas address left feathers ruffled among the “princes of the church.” His removal of the staunchly orthodox Cardinal Raymond Burke from his position as the head of the Apostolic Signatura (and his other curial positions) was seen by many as retribution for Burke’s public criticisms of the themes — like Holy Communion for the divorced and remarried — that were informing the synod process. His unilateral promulgation of two motu proprio letters reforming the marriage annulment process caused consternation among canonists and members of diocesan marriage tribunals and generated uncomfortable whispers from members of the appropriate Roman dicasteries who were not consulted in the creation of these important juridical documents. Last year, rumors of a conspiracy to force Pope Benedict XVI out of office and elect then-Cardinal Bergoglio were started by none other than Cardinal Godfried Danneels, the beleaguered archbishop emeritus of Brussels who remains a close associate of Francis, despite his track record as a promoter of heterodox ideas and protector of clerical sex abusers.

For close observers of the church, if not the wider public, Francis’s ruthlessness is no secret. This aspect of the Argentinian pope’s personality has already earned him his share of enemies. In an open letter to Francis from a former high-ranking member of the Roman Curia published last December, the official — who chose to remain anonymous for fear of retribution — admonished the pope for “an authoritarianism of which even the founder of your Order of Jesuits, St. Ignatius himself, would not approve.” He went on to describe the result of this authoritarianism: a “climate of fear” within the Vatican. Rumors have been circulating Rome for months that the Holy Father threatened the 13 Cardinals who sent him a letter expressing their own concerns over the synod — rumors that no source able to talk about it has been willing to confirm on the record. Francesca Chaouqui, an Italian public relations executive under investigation for leaks detailing scandalous Vatican mismanagement, went so far as to say of the pope’s growing list of opponents that “many people in the Vatican want Francis dead.”

With the promulgation of his new, extensive apostolic exhortation, Francis has shown once again that he is a man clever enough to get what he wants against all odds. The document’s length will prohibit a comprehensive analysis for some time yet, but already Catholic progressives are celebrating its innovations, and theologians are lamenting the damage it will undoubtedly do to the already crumbling edifice of Christian marriage and the church’s teaching on sexual ethics. As has been the Vatican playbook since the 1960s, the document is packed with careful language, layers of nuance, and ambiguity offering a buffer against cries of “heresy.” At the same time, these openly semantic doors offer opportunities for exploitation by means of subjective “discernment” by those who have most longed to see the church change its teachings to “get with the times.”

In his own words from the text of the exhortation, Francis advises that we “recall that this discernment is dynamic; it must remain ever open to new stages of growth and to new decisions which can enable the ideal to be more fully realized.” Like much else about this papacy, it’s a statement that could mean whatever one wants it to mean. The real agenda lies hidden beneath.

PAT SAYS:

This article obviously sketches the enemies of Francis and must be read in that light.

Of course, Francis is not timid or soft. A timid or soft man would not last an hour in what must be one of the most corrupt institutions in the history of mankind.

He must have a tough side - maybe even a ruthless side.

Maybe one needs to have a tough and ruthless side to survive in such a place.

But of course, he must also have a listening side. The Catholic Church is very diverse with liberals, conservatives and those in between.

I am a liberal. But I do have some empathy for conservatives - and they have rights too.

But NO SIDE should rule the roost.

In the Catholic Church, we should all be asking: "WHAT WOULD JESUS DO" and then do that whether or not it appeals to our own positions.

For instance, the Latin Mass is not from Jesus. It was created by men.

And Jesus also would have empathy for the adulterer as he would have for the virgin. He rescued a woman caught in the very act of adultery from the religious fanatics of his day.

The problem for the Catholic Church - and all churches, is, that the voices of men drown out the voice of God.

And THAT is the ULTIMATE TRAGEDY!


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VESPERS - EVE OF FIRST SUNDAY OF ADVENT

BEFORE THE BLESSED SACRAMENT

THE LITTLE BROTHERS OF THE ORATORY LARNE



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44 comments:

  1. 'Ruthlessly making it liberal'? Absolute bollocks!!!!

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    Replies
    1. And you Magna, A man without inner aesthetics. Another day of commentary on Pope Francis based on Vatican gossip. Of course there will always be a power struggle and political machinations in the Church at high level. What do you want - wouldn't Pat's blog be lost without it. But, it brings out the vile, nasty, anti clerical bigotry in a very hateful way.

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    2. An article from the Foreign Policy magazine, vile?

      Why should we Catholics not be interested in the goings on at the Vatican?

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    3. No problem Pat with true and accurate information. I notice Magna was allowed the use of the foul word "b****** but you censor other people using it. Double standards!! When comments are being made, proper research should apply not innuendo and gutter style sound bytes. There are many within the Curia who dislike being challenged by Pioe Francis.

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    4. Actually it says it's from the Foreign Police magazine.

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  2. A daily task.. Finding fault with everyone..

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  3. Perhaps the picture says it all. Look to Jesus

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  4. I hope the new community house has a smoke alarm fitted (with a battery in).

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    Replies
    1. It has no stairs which would make for a quick exit anyway.

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    2. Not if you were sound asleep.

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    3. I would not want sleep a wink if I was there

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  5. It wouldn't surprise me if this were true. Since Bergoglio obviously isn't pope in reality, they'd be wasting their time killing him.

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    Replies
    1. Isn't he obviously an anti-Pope?

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    2. Another Novus-Ordo-Watch nutter at 10:45

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    3. Bingo - Maggie never fails to bite. Since the only opinion that matters to her is her own it's amazing she even reads anyone else's. Oh my bad - she does it to snipe at people.

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  6. I see Magna was at another 'party' at 1 this morning when he left his erudite comment. No doubt his fellow party-goers were treated to his gems of wit...or were more likely speechless, since he was addressing a bottle. 'I could have been a priest you know but they didn't appreciate me...'

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  7. Why bother to ask? - - Another crank with an axe to grind. Some of us are not about to go into wide-eyed wonder at the regurgitation of all that silliness. We don't feel we always have to respond to "click bait" throwaway remarks such as at 10.45.(But I bet some people fail into the respond trap!)

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  8. We have been blessed with great Popes in the 20th and early 21st Century - up to Benedict XVI.

    Now it appears that God is punishing the Church for all it's infidelity with a corrupt, weak Pope, much like He did in previous times of great iniquity and scandal in the Church.

    Woe to the world when the majority of clergy is corrupt.

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    1. 12:54 Self-indulgent delusional comments on Pope Francis.

      Furthermore, if that’s the kind of God you believe in, you haven’t got very far in re-evaluating chilfhood images and exchanging them for adult concepts.

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    2. 15:45, you appear to know nothing of church history or the Scriptures.

      You do seem to propagate an amalgam of Pop and Freudian psychology. The two preceding are the ultimate in self delusion.

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  9. For all we know someone could be up at 1am saying prayers. What does it matter ? Assumptions of alcoholism is nasty and reflects the person making them and their own problems.

    As Pope Francis said - the Eucharist is not a prize for the perfect.

    Anonymous posters such as myself can say what they like. Magna Carta comes in his own name and we can see his comments. What about anonymous posters who for all we know may have more faces than Big Ben.

    Let’s be Christian.

    Peace.

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    Replies
    1. Several points -
      1.Nobody is called Magna Carta: he is as anonymous as you.
      2. There is no way MC spent the night in prayer, lol
      3. Not everyone who comments here feels the need to be Christian in any way. I for one am a post-Christian and visit this blog with an interest in Pat's exposing the hypocrisy of the Catholic church.
      4. Funny how people leap on the Francis-isn't-pope comment above - it's exactly Francis's own approach to other views. Scratch the surface of a liberal and what do you find?
      5. I see growing disquiet in several camps about Francis's actions...

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    2. 14.57. Magna deserves all the criticism made against him. He frequently degrades many people on this blog and does so very viciously, unjustly and nastily. He just likes reading his own words. When he learns to respect others, then he will receive the same in return. So, whatever influences his mind, it's most certainly not the Holy Spirit!!!

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    3. You are not all that bright 14:57, sure you’re not?

      Magna Carta is an anonymous poster as much as anyone else. MC is a disguise - in fact - that particular man tries very carefully to conceal his true identity.

      But some of us know a thing or two .... Lol ;-)

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    4. 20:01, I post PSEUDONYMOUSLY, not anonymously.

      And I try no harder to conceal my identity than you yours.

      I, too, know a thing or two: YOU'RE not all that bright, 'sure you're not'? LOL😆

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    5. Some people,
      If they had brains
      Would be tres dangereuse
      Ain’t that so 14:57?

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    6. I too have long admired Magna Carta's willingness to sign up to a Google profile and post not from the shadows but under his own name.

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    7. No need to go down my throat, 20:01, especially on a Sunday. Sort out your anger issues, you keyboard warrior.

      Pax

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    8. 14.57. "Let's be christian. Peace....." A vain hope. If you are seeking an expression of Christianity or peace, you've come to the wrong place. Neither will be found here as you must well know by now....Christianity and peace - too noble to be discovered here.

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    9. In all its brevity I feel this is one of Pope Francis' most important teachings. Far from being a prize for the perfect the Eucharist is a medicine for sinners.

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  10. Just thinking about a comment by Nuala yesterday...
    /Snip/
    Similarly he assumes everyone who has concerns about his various novel statements is an enemy. His response - name calling!! He calls people rigid neo pelagian pharisees if they ask questions that are awkward. Some of his abusive labels border on the pornographic.
    In parish life some of the biggest bullies I have experienced are comfortable middle class "liberals" who know better than anyone else. I have never met Pope Francis and I pray for him every day but some of his behaviour strikes me as nasty and petty.
    /Snip/
    Remind you of anyone else? Pat, you're being honoured, old son.

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  11. Pat, no harm to you but stop all this stuff at the top end of the church and all the theological mush mish. Get back to the home grown business. The scandals in D&C and Armagh. There’s are good’un brewing in west Belfast. You must know about it.

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    Replies
    1. Go on 19:03 - give us a clue! What part of the West?

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  12. Noel Treanor is sitting on several potential priest scandals.

    I have personal knowledge of THREE.

    I'm not sure which one you mean?

    bishopbuckley1@outlook.com

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  13. 09:45 ... are you anticipating a fire at the new community house?

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    Replies
    1. Everyone should treat fire safety issues extremely seriously, especially if visitors are occasionally expected as would be required under public liability insurance.

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  14. Pat, is today's blog the best you can come up with on the 1st Sunday of Advent where the Word of God challenges us individually to be attentive to the presence of God and to personally renew ourselves first and foremost. The grenades you are throwing at Bishop Treanor are unnecessary. Let him, his advisors and the law, if necessary, deal with matters. The obsession you have in always believing your own narrative is a perversion. You just simply love the downfall of others. You should reflect on your own failures, sins and imperfections. No doubt you piously led Evening Prayer with the Little Brothers!!! Your alter ego on this blog is anathema to the spirit of Advent. Heal thyself first.

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    1. MournemanMichael4 December 2017 at 13:26

      Maybe it's as well to ignore woolly headed comment from those enveloped in the cocoon of self satisfied denial.
      " Keep her lit!".
      MMM

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  15. 23.26
    Some of us have no interest in Advent ( don’t know what it really means either)
    Yes I was at catholic schools, but then life and living took over.
    Don’t have any interest in Christmas either, yes I have a little knowledge about that.
    Why if you are a Christian can you criticise and actually tell Pat what he should reflect on.
    Just read what you typed.........

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  16. Have you healed yourself 23.26 ? Sheeeesh

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  17. I’m not a fan of Vatican II worship settings, but that pic of your oratory with the Sacrament exposed speaks volumes. I trust that it is not lost in obscurity but makes another appearance.

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    1. At my Oratory in Larne and The Brothers Oratory the Blessed Sacrament is reserved in a locked tabernacle with a sanctuary lamp ALWAYS burning.

      When exposed it is done so with the utmost respect and reverence always.

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